Policy

pattern

Education and training

Apparent retention rates to both Year 10 and Year 12 have increased for Aboriginal students over the past ten years. However, persistent gaps remain between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal student outcomes in reading, writing and numeracy, as well as attendance rates.

The progress that has been made in kindergarten participation and retention is anticipated to have positive flow-on effects for reading, writing and numeracy outcomes for Aboriginal learners in coming years.

Headline indicator 4: Improve literacy and numeracy in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9

Target: By 2018, halve the gap for Aboriginal students in reading, writing and numeracy.

This target is not on track.

Despite some improvements in the proportion of Aboriginal students achieving at or above NAPLAN national minimum standards, there remains a persistent gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal attainment across all domains and at all year levels. In most domains this gap widens in the later years of school. For example, in 2017:

  • 90.9% of Aboriginal students were at or above the national minimum standards in Year 3 writing, compared to 96.5% for non-Aboriginal students.
  • 60.4% of Aboriginal students were at or above the national minimum standards in Year 9 writing, compared to 84.9% for non-Aboriginal students.

Despite some improvements in the proportion of Aboriginal students achieving at or above NAPLAN national minimum standards, there remains a persistent gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal attainment across all domains and at all year levels. In most domains this gap widens in the later years of school.Headline indicator 5: Increase the proportion of Aboriginal young people aged 20-24 who have completed at least Year 12 or equivalent

Target: By 2020, halve the gap between the Year 12 or equivalent attainment rates for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 20-24 year olds.

This target is on track.

The gap in Year 12 or equivalent attainment has narrowed by more than a third with 71.3% of Aboriginal people aged 20-24 years old having attained a Year 12 or equivalent qualification in 2016. This is up from 56.4% in 2006.

The gap in Year 12 or equivalent attainment has narrowed by more than a third with 71.3% of Aboriginal people aged 20-24 years old having attained a Year 12 or equivalent qualification in 2016. This is up from 56.4% in 2006.Other measures

Measure: Retention of Aboriginal students to Year 10.

The gap in Year 10 apparent retention has narrowed by 18.2 percentage points, with apparent retention rates for Aboriginal students increasing from 76.6% in 2008 to 97.2% in 2017.

The gap in Year 10 apparent retention has narrowed by 18.2 percentage points, with apparent retention rates for Aboriginal students increasing from 76.6% in 2008 to 97.2% in 2017.

Measure: School attendance rates for Aboriginal students.

While more Aboriginal students are staying in school longer, absenteeism remains a significant issue.

In 2017, the average attendance rate for Aboriginal students in Years 1–10 was 86.5% and the average for non-Aboriginal students was 92.6%. By Year 10, the gap in attendance equated to Aboriginal students receiving six months less schooling than their non-Aboriginal peers.

Absenteeism tends to increase across grade levels and is highest in Year 10 for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students.

In 2017, the average attendance rate for Aboriginal students in Years 1–10 was 86.5% and the average for non-Aboriginal students was 92.6%. By Year 10, the gap in attendance equated to Aboriginal students receiving six months less schooling than their non Aboriginal peers.

 

Measure: The rate of transition of Aboriginal young people aged 18-24 years to employment and/or further education.

In 2017, almost a third of Aboriginal young people (27.7%) went on to study a Bachelor’s degree at university in the year after leaving school compared to over half of non-Aboriginal school leavers (54.6%).

A further 27.7% of Aboriginal young people were in either full or part?time employment in the year after leaving school compared to 19.2% of non-Aboriginal school leavers.

A further 11.6% of Aboriginal school leavers were looking for work in 2017, compared to 4.5% of non-Aboriginal school leavers.

In 2017, almost a third of Aboriginal young people (27.7%) went on to study a Bachelor’s degree at university in the year after leaving school compared to over half of non-Aboriginal school leavers (54.6%).

 

Victorian Government reform

In Victoria, every kid deserves every chance. Education is a critical factor in ensuring Aboriginal young people have the tools to be self-determining, including exercising choice and autonomy, and to realise their aspirations in life.

The Victorian Government is committed to delivering excellence in outcomes and services for Aboriginal students, so that they achieve their potential, feel strong in their cultural identity, and experience educational outcomes that set them up for life.

The Victorian Government, through Marrung: Aboriginal Education Plan 2016-2026 (Marrung), is working to ensure universal service systems in Victoria are respectful and responsive to Koorie learners and their families across early childhood, school and post-compulsory education sectors.

The development, implementation and governance of Marrung is based on the principle of self-determination. Marrung was developed in partnership with the Victorian Government’s principal partner in Aboriginal education, Victorian Aboriginal Education Association Incorporated (VAEAI).

Marrung’s governance mechanisms ensure direct accountability to the Aboriginal community through VAEAI-convened Koorie Education Roundtables, Regional Partnership Forums (co-chaired by a Local Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Chairperson and the Department of Education and Training (DET) Regional Director) and the Central Governance Committee (co-chaired by the VAEAI President and DET Secretary).