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Outcomes reform in Victoria

We're using an outcomes approach to focus on what matters to reform the public sector and create better outcomes for Victoria.

Why we're focusing on outcomes

Our focus on outcomes communicates Victoria’s key priorities, why they matter and what success looks like.

Good public policy and service delivery must demonstrate its value to the community. In the past, government has measured what it does, and not necessarily what it achieves.

Often government focuses on outputs (what activities, products or services it is providing) and how much it costs to provide them. Just monitoring and reporting on outputs doesn't provide evidence of the impact of our work. 

Focusing on outcomes instead of outputs allows us to better identify what we want to achieve for Victoria. It connects our work with communities, experts and service delivery sectors. It also provides flexibility and enables us to communicate what we want to achieve in a way that is meaningful for Victorians.

Our outcomes approach

Achieving meaningful change requires a shared understanding and common language. Our outcomes approach provides a consistent way to design and measure outcomes. The outcomes approach will help to drive collaboration across government and identify shared aspirations and areas of work.

The outcomes approach:

  • includes space for ambition
  • drives us to think and work in fundamentally different ways
  • supports better use of available evidence
  • shows where we can improve policies and programs to align better to government priorities
  • is underpinned by an outcomes architecture

Applying the outcomes architecture

Victoria’s outcomes architecture is based on international best practice. We drew on the experience of Scotland, New Zealand and other jurisdictions to create our outcomes approach.

Our architecture helps provide consistency in how we identify and measure Victoria's progress towards government priorities.

Our outcomes architecture contains the following elements:

  • the vision describes an aspirational statement of what we want to achieve
  • domains describe the success components of the vision, and cut across traditional policy areas
  • outcome statements describe what success looks like for all individuals, families or communities
  • outcome indicators describe what needs to change to achieve the outcomes and the direction of change required
  • outcome measures quantify the size, amount or degree of change required

These components of the architecture allow us to describe what success looks like, how we get there and measure our impact. 

Outcomes architecture pyramid, made up of three sections - describing success incorporates vision and domains, while measuring success incorporates the next 3 items listed above. The bottom section is labelled measuring delivery and incorporates outputs, activities and inputs.

Outcomes workshops

The Outcomes and Evidence branch in the Department of Premier and Cabinet conducts workshops to help government:

  • understand Victoria’s outcomes approach
  • apply the outcomes approach using a logic model and the outcomes architecture
  • design outcomes frameworks to organise and communicate priorities, and measure the impact of our work

We tailor our workshops to specific audiences and provide followup support and guidance.

Our progress

We have established an outcomes approach that is flexible and that all government departments can use.

The Outcomes Reform in Victoria policy statement outlines the next phase of outcomes implementation.

Outcomes reform is supported by evidence reform

Achieving long-term change depends on having good quality information. Better information can improve decisions and guide our everyday actions. It enables us to be responsive to changing circumstances and different needs and priorities. That's why we're also leading evidence reform to improve the way we generate, use and share evidence across the Victorian public service.

Reviewed 26 April 2019

Contact us

Outcomes and Evidence Branch Department of Premier and Cabinet

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