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Ebony O’Doherty-Bowman, electrical apprentice with Powercor Australia and trainer Ray Borowiak at Australia’s first wind turbine training tower at Ballarat’s Federation University, where wind turbine technicians can train instead of using fly-in-fly-out workers.

Across Victoria, almost 832,100 people are enrolled in the vocational education and training, adult community education and higher education sectors. Of these, there are over 565,000 people enrolled in vocational education and training or adult community education, of which almost 60 per cent are government funded. The VSA wants to ensure this investment in training and education achieves the best possible outcomes.

Data in the Skills Plan will guide decisions around funding of courses and provision of Skills First training for 2023. (Through Skills First settings, the Government subsidises those courses– the Funded Course List and the Funded Skill Set List – determined to be of the highest economic and social value to Victorians.)

Feedback in developing this Skills Plan highlighted that a more granular level of skills needs beyond occupations is needed. A common issue was that emerging occupations with unique skills were not captured in the data and the skill expectations of existing occupations were transforming, driven principally by technology. New approaches to identify these skills is an important part of future skills plans.

The Skills Plan will also guide future planning for the TAFE Network and the OTCD. The importance of securing delivery of critical niche skills for industry is also highlighted.

The data is available to all education and training providers and higher education institutes to guide their planning and investments, and to industry to support their workforce planning. www.vic.gov.au/victorian-skills-authority

Reviewed 30 August 2022

Victorian Skills Plan for 2022 into 2023

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