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Employment type

Across the specialist and primary prevention workforces, over half of respondents indicated that they were employed on a full-time basis (ongoing or fixed term, 58% and 51% respectively - see Table 6); though primary prevention workers were less likely to hold ongoing full-time roles.

Table 6: On what basis are you employed in this role?
Employment type Specialist family violence response (n=1,532) Primary prevention (n=504)
Ongoing full time 46% 34%
Fixed-term full time 12% 17%
Ongoing part time 27% 25%
Fixed-term part time 10% 18%
Casual / sessional 3% 4%
Other 2% 2%

Hours and days worked

The majority of the specialist workforce indicated that they were generally paid to undertake their work during normal business hours (see Figure 1). Around one-in-five reported that they were frequently (‘often’ or ‘very often’) paid to undertake their work after hours on weekdays (19%), while 11% were frequently paid to work on weekends. A relatively smaller proportion of the primary prevention workforce reported frequently being paid to undertake their work after hours on weekdays (13%), whilst 7% reported doing so on weekends.

The majority of specialists indicated they were generally paid to undertake their work during normal business hours with around one-in-five reporting they were frequently paid to undertake work after hours on weekdays (19%), while 11% were frequently paid to work on weekends. 13% of primary prevention workforce reported frequently being paid to undertake their work after hours on weekdays, 7% on weekends.
Figure 1: How often are you paid to work outside of normal business hours, if at all? Base: Specialists and primary prevention

Unpaid work

Respondents were also asked to provide comment about any unpaid work that they undertook.

  • Overall, fewer than one-in-three specialists indicated that they frequently worked additional unpaid hours (17% often and 14% very often / always), though a further 26% reported that they sometimes did so.
  • Similarly, one-third of the primary prevention workforce reported that they often worked additional unpaid hours (21% often and 13% very often / always), whilst a further 30% noted that they sometimes did so.

Reviewed 01 July 2021

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