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Training and confidence

This chapter explores the levels of confidence, understanding of the MARAM framework and perceptions of training across the three workforces. The information in this chapter may be used to inform potential future training and support requirements.

Confidence

Around three-in-five specialists indicated that they were ‘extremely’ or ‘very’ confident that they have had enough training and experience to effectively perform their role(s) in relation to family violence response (61%). Those in the broader workforce were also asked about their level of confidence, with only 28% indicating that they were confident.

In relation to the primary prevention of family violence, around half of primary prevention practitioners indicated they were at least very confident (49%), whilst just one-in-five respondents from the broader workforce indicated they were at least very confident (20%).

around three-in-five specialists indicated that they were ‘extremely’ or ‘very’ confident that they have had enough training and experience to effectively perform their role(s) in relation to family violence response (61%). Those in the broader workforce were also asked about their level of confidence, with only 28% indicating that they were confident.
Figure 3: Confidence in level of training and experience. Base: All respondents

When asked about what additional support would increase their confidence in performing their role, all workforces indicated that information sharing and collaboration was most important.

MARAM

  • 92% of the specialist workforce had heard of the MARAM framework.
  • 79% of the primary prevention workforce had heard of the MARAM framework
  • 53% of the aggregate broader workforce had heard of the MARAM framework.

The three broader workforce sub-groups with the greatest awareness of the MARAM framework were maternal and child health (95% were aware); alcohol and drug services (86%); and housing and homelessness (80%); whilst ambulance services reported the lowest awareness (7%, see Table 7).

Table 7: Awareness, understanding and use of the MARAM framework and tools by workforce (including broader workforce sub-groups)

Workforce Aware of the MARAM framework (% Yes) Organisation prescribed to align with the MARAM framework (% Yes) I have a good understanding of my professional responsibilities under the MARAM framework (% Agree) In identifying or assessing FV risk, I always use MARAM tools, including a structured professional judgement approach (% Agree)
Specialist family
violence response
(n=946-1,482)
92% 81% 79% 62%
Primary prevention
(n=131-474)
79% 52% 56% 34%
Broader workforce
aggregate
(n=838-2,711
53% 67% 63% 39%
Alcohol and Drug
services
(n=119-202)
86% 76% 63% 35%
Ambulance services
(n=5-149)
7% 55% Supressed (low sample size) Supressed (low sample size)
Broader community services
(n=613-1,401)
68% 73% 61% 36%
Children, Families
and Child Protection
(n=213-388)
80% 78% 68% 44%
Community Health Services
(n=119-306)
62% 72% 53% 34%
Community Mental Health Services
(n=71-192)
61% 68% 50% 24%
Court Services
(n=19-105)
50% 49% 54% 37%
Disability Services
(n=10-119)
24% 38% 73% 40%
Education
(n=12-259)
25% 23% 57% 17%
Housing and Homelessness
(n=89-167)
80% 72% 54% 30%
Justice
(n=33-112)
61% 66% 67% 45%
Legal Services
(n=4-58)
57% 24% Supressed (low sample size) Supressed (low sample size)
Maternal and Child Health
(n=90-126)
95% 90% 70% 46%
Other Community Services
(n=79-269)
59% 61% 60% 29%
Police
(n=39-129)
57% 60% 81% 72%
Public health
(n=68-523)
27% 58% 53% 31%
Settlement Services
(n=8-31)
48% 67% Supressed (low sample size) Supressed (low sample size)
Youth Work
(n=57-111)
78% 72% 65% 32%

Training

All three workforces were asked to identify the family violence prevention and response topics that they had completed training in, and those they would like further training in. Table 8 illustrates the key findings, by workforce. The top three barriers to accessing further training / development are also shown below.

Table 8: Top three training areas completed and desired, and top three barriers to accessing training, by workforce

Training completed Helpfulness of completed training (% Helpful) Training desired in future Main barriers in accessing further training and development

Specialist FV response(n=1,415)

(n=921-1,013)

(n=1,155)

(n=1,457)

Family violence risk assessment and risk management (CRAF) (73%)

75%

Working with people with disabilities (50%)

Lack of time (52%)

Identifying and screening family violence (69%)

82%

Sexual assault in family violence (48%)

Cost of study (42%)

Trauma-informed practice (67%)

88%

Working with adolescents (48%)

Location of training facility (32%)

Primary prevention(n=433)

(n=209-248)

(n=376)

(n=461)

Gender equity (59%)

80%

Working with Aboriginal communities(52%)

Lack of time (57%)

Foundation / introductory primary prevention of violence against women (58%)

75%

Multi-Agency Risk Assessment and Management (MARAM) (50%)

Cost of study (42%)

Recognising and responding to disclosures (50%)

76%

Managing backlash and resistance(49%)

Location of training facility (32%)

Broader workforce aggregate*(n=2,477)

(n=955-1,024)

(n=1,941)

(n=2,603)

Identifying and screening family violence (43%)

67%

Multi-Agency Risk Assessment and Management (MARAM) (59%)

Lack of time (44%)

Trauma-informed practice (42%)

83%

Legal issues for family violence (49%)

Cost of study (35%)

Family violence risk assessment and risk management (CRAF) (39%) 62% Working with perpetrators of family violence (48%) Location of training facility (27%)

Reviewed 01 July 2021

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