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Department of Premier and Cabinet Annual Report 2018-19

Find general and financial information about DPC's operations and performance in 2018-19.

DPC’s 2018–19 Annual Report and accompanying financial statements present a summary of the department’s performance over the 2018–19 financial year.

Further information about DPC portfolio entities can be obtained, where applicable, from their individual 2018–19 annual reports.

Responsible body’s declaration

In accordance with the Financial Management Act 1994, I am pleased to present the Department of Premier and Cabinet’s annual report for the year ending 30 June 2019.
Chris Eccles AO, Secretary
October 2019

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    Publishing information

    DPC’s 2018–19 Annual Report and accompanying financial statements present a summary of the department’s performance over the 2018–19 financial year.

    Further information about DPC portfolio entities can be obtained, where applicable, from their individual 2018–19 annual reports.

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    ISSN 1833–0878

    Authorised by the Victorian Government
    1 Treasury Place, Melbourne 3002

    © State of Victoria (Department of Premier and Cabinet) 2019

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Author:
Department of Premier and Cabinet
Date:
October 2019

Secretary's foreword

Secretary’s foreword by Chris Eccles AO, Secretary, Department of Premier and Cabinet.

Chris Eccles AO Secretary

As the First Minister’s department, the Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC) has the pre-eminent role in exercising whole of government policy and performance leadership.

With an expansive reform agenda, the government continues to rely on DPC to lead, support and unify critical initiatives and programs.

The latter half of 2018 saw significant focus on preparing for the caretaker period and November’s state election. This required DPC to lead a substantial whole of government effort, working with colleagues across the public service in undertaking the critical work associated with preparing for a returning or new administration. The work included advice and support in determining and applying the caretaker conventions, the substantial effort required for the delivery of incoming government briefings, and the major task of archiving Cabinet-in-Confidence material.

Following the election, the Premier approved machinery of government changes to provide the public service with a structure that reflects the government’s priorities and will best deliver outcomes for the government and the people of Victoria.

This meant changes for our department, including the creation of the Fairer Victoria group, bringing together the portfolios of multicultural affairs and social cohesion, equality, veterans, youth and women’s policy. The group elevates some of Victoria’s strongest community assets to the centre of government and supports the government’s commitment to a stronger and more cohesive Victoria.

DPC has also welcomed Industrial Relations Victoria (IRV), in recognition of IRV’s critical whole of government role, and in June this year we established two more groups - Service Systems Reform and the Jobs and Skills Exchange - to further ensure we are best organised to meet the government’s priorities for this term.

As set out in this annual report, DPC, while leading the public service through what has been a considerable period of change, has also led a number of notable initiatives, two of which I would like to make particular mention.

In August 2018 Victoria became the first Australian state to enact treaty legislation, a historic step forward in the process of self-determination. I look forward to working in partnership with the democratically-elected Aboriginal Representative Body - the first state-wide elected body for Aboriginal Victorians in Victoria’s history - to establish the elements necessary to support meaningful and effective treaty-making in Victoria.

This year we commemorated the 10-year anniversary of the 2009 Victorian bushfires. Many colleagues across the public service worked on the response to the fires in 2009. The resilience and community spirit of that time was evident again in the planning and delivery of the state’s commemoration activities, including a public commemoration event in February, which provided an important opportunity for the community to reflect on this tragedy and remember the 173 people who lost their lives.

Within DPC my vision remains for us to be an organisation based on truth, where we successfully collaborate with one another and with other stakeholders in the pursuit of shared objectives in our service to the Victorian community. We should have a dynamic and inclusive environment in which we can respectfully debate and challenge ideas in pursuit of the best outcome and where diversity of perspective and background is valued for the strength that it is. This year we took further steps in this effort by creating the Gender Equity Action Plan, released the LGBTIQ Inclusion Plan for 2019–21 and appointed an executive sponsor for LGBTIQ inclusion at the Deputy Secretary level. I commend all colleagues for our collective endeavour in ensuring a culture of genuine inclusion in DPC.

In closing, I would again like to acknowledge my colleagues on the Victorian Secretaries’ Board for their leadership of the public service, as a collective, to strive for excellence in high-quality public policy, public administration and public sector performance in service to the people of Victoria.

Chris Eccles AO, Secretary, Department of Premier and Cabinet


About us

DPC’s vision is to be a recognised and respected leader in whole of government policy and performance.

Our vision

DPC’s vision is to be a recognised and respected leader in whole of government policy and performance.

DPC works for the people of Victoria by helping the government achieve its strategic objectives. It does this by supporting the Premier, Deputy Premier, the Special Minister of State, the ministers for Aboriginal Affairs, Equality, Industrial Relations, Multicultural Affairs, Veterans, Women and Youth, as well as the Cabinet.

DPC leads the Victorian public service (VPS) by:

  • setting clear expectations
  • driving the government’s objectives
  • providing unifying intelligence within the Victorian Government
  • pursuing excellence in whole of government outcomes in delivery and reform

Our objectives

DPC’s objectives are as follows.

Strong policy outcomes

  • pursuing policy and service delivery excellence and reform
  • leading the public sector response to significant state issues, policy challenges and projects
  • supporting the effective administration of government

Engaged citizens

  • supporting and promoting full participation in strong and vibrant communities
  • empowering citizens to participate in policymaking and service design
  • ensuring a holistic approach to social policy and service delivery

Professional public administration

  • fostering and promoting a high-performing public service
  • ensuring effective whole of government performance and outcomes
  • protecting the values of good public governance, integrity and accountability in support of public trust

High-performing DPC

  • empowering our people and investing in our culture
  • ensuring efficient and effective processes and systems
  • ensuring good governance and risk management

Our values

DPC upholds the public sector values as outlined in the Public Administration Act 2004.

Responsiveness

  • providing frank, impartial and timely advice to the government
  • providing high-quality services to the Victorian community
  • identifying and promoting best practice

Integrity

  • being honest, open and transparent in our dealings
  • using powers responsibly
  • reporting improper conduct
  • avoiding any real or apparent conflicts of interest
  • striving to earn and sustain public trust at the highest level

Impartiality

  • making decisions and providing advice on merit without bias, caprice, favouritism or
  • self-interest
  • acting fairly by objectively considering all relevant facts and applying fair criteria
  • implementing government policies and programs equitably

Accountability

  • working to clear objectives in a transparent manner
  • accepting responsibility for our decisions and actions
  • seeking to achieve best use of resources
  • submitting ourselves to appropriate scrutiny

Respect

  • treating others fairly and objectively
  • ensuring freedom from discrimination, harassment and bullying
  • using others’ views to improve outcomes on an ongoing basis

Leadership

  • actively implementing, promoting and supporting these values

Commitment to human rights

  • making decisions and providing advice consistent with the human rights set out in the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act 2006
  • actively implementing, promoting and supporting human rights

Our ministers

Victoria's ministers.

Premier of Victoria

The Hon Daniel Andrews MP

The Hon Daniel Andrews MP

As Victoria’s head of government, DPC advises and supports the Premier and his portfolio.

The Premier also has responsibility for the Office of the Governor, the Victorian Public Sector Commission and the Office of the Victorian Government Architect.

Contact details

1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Telephone: 03 9651 5000
Email: daniel.andrews@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.premier.vic.gov.au

Special Minister of State and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

Gavin Jennings MLC

Special Minister of State and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

As Special Minister of State the Minister oversees government transparency, integrity, accountability and public sector administration and reform.

The Minister’s other responsibility with DPC is to oversee the Aboriginal Affairs portfolio.

Contact details

Level 3, 1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Telephone: 03 8392 5708
Email: gavin.jennings@parliament.vic.gov.au

Former Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

The Hon Natalie Hutchins MP was Minister for Aboriginal Affairs until 29 November 2018.

Minister for Industrial Relations

Tim Pallas MP

Tim Pallas MP

With the support of DPC, the Minister looks after the Industrial Relations portfolio, which includes having oversight of the Labour Hire Licensing Authority and the Portable Long Service Benefits Authority.

Contact details

Level 4, 1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Telephone: 03 9651 5201
Email: tim.pallas@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.timpallas.com.au

Minister for Women and Minister for Youth

Gabrielle Williams MP

Gabrielle Williams MP

Minister Williams oversees the Women and Youth portfolios with the support and advice of DPC. As part of the Women’s portfolio, the Minister also has oversight of the Queen Victoria Women’s Centre Trust.

Contact details

Level 22, 50 Lonsdale Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Telephone: 03 9096 8587
Email: gabrielle.williams@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.gabriellewilliams.com.au

Minister for Equality

Martin Foley MP

Martin Foley MP

Minister Foley oversees the LGBTIQ Equality portfolio with the assistance of DPC, the Victorian Gender and Sexuality Commissioner and the Victorian LGBTIQ Taskforce.

Contact details

Level 22, 50 Lonsdale Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Telephone: 03 9096 7500
Email: martin.foley@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.martinfoley.com.au

Minister for Veterans

Robin Scott MP

Robin Scott MP

Robin Scott MP is Victoria’s Minister for Veterans. The Minister oversees the Veterans portfolio with advice from DPC and the Victorian Veterans Council. Mr Scott also oversees the Shrine of Remembrance Trustees.

Contact details

Level 5, 1 Macarthur Street
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Telephone: 03 9651 1044
Email: robin.scott@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.facebook.com/ robinscottmp

Former Minister for Veterans

The Hon John Eren MP was Minister for Veterans until 29 November 2018.

Minister for Multicultural Affairs

The Hon Richard Wynne MP

The Hon Richard Wynne MP

Minister Wynne leads the government’s Multicultural Affairs portfolio and is supported by DPC and the Victorian Multicultural Commission.

Contact details

Level 16, 8 Nicholson Street
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Telephone: 03 8683 0964
Email: richard.wynne@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website : www.richardwynne.com.au

Former Minister for Multicultural Affairs

Robin Scott MP was the Minister for Multicultural Affairs until 29 November 2018.

Other officials

Mary-Anne Thomas MP, Cabinet Secretary

DPC’s Cabinet Office supports the Cabinet Secretary for the operations of the Cabinet process and supports the Cabinet Secretary in her role.

Contact details

Email: mary-anne.thomas@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.mary-annethomas.com.au

Danny Pearson MP, Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier

Mr Pearson assists the Premier with his portfolio responsibilities.

Contact details

Email: danny.pearson@parliament.vic.gov.au


Organisational chart

Organisational chart for the Department of Premier and Cabinet.

As at 30 June 2019

The Secretary is Chris Eccles AO, who leads the department comprised of 5 groups and its associated entities and agencies.

Governance, Policy & Coordination

Jeremi Moule, Deputy Secretary

  • Andrew Campbell, Corporate Services, Executive Director
  • Jithma Beneragama, Digital Design & Innovation, Executive Director
  • Carolyn De Gois, WOVG Corporate Services One VPS, Special Adviser
  • Genevieve Dolan, Strategic Communication, Engagement & Protocol, Executive Director
  • Vicky Hudson, Governance, Acting Executive Director
  • Jane Gardam, Cabinet Office, Acting Executive Director
  • Sam Hannah-Rankin, Public Sector Reform, Acting Executive Director
  • Lisa Tepper, Enterprise Solutions, Executive Director

Social Policy

Kate Houghton, Deputy Secretary

  • Tim Kanoa, Aboriginal Affairs Policy, Executive Director
  • Nicola Quin, Health, Human Services, Aboriginal Affairs Policy, Executive Director
  • Elly Patira, Treaty, Executive Director
  • Ryan Batchelor, Executive Director, Justice, Family Violence
  • Penny Croser and Rebecca Jarvis, Executive Directors, Education, Mental Health Royal Commission Response

Fairer Victoria

Brigid Monagle, Deputy Secretary

  • John Batho, Multicultural Affairs & Social Cohesion, Equality, Executive Director
  • David Burns, Veterans, Office For Women & Youth, Executive Director

Economic Policy & State Productivity

Tim Ada, Deputy Secretary

  • Connie Crisafi, Economic Development & International, Acting Executive Director
  • Chris Miller, Infrastructure Planning & Major Projects, Executive Director
  • Matt Minchin, Energy Resources & Environment, Executive Director
  • Marcus Walsh, Economic Strategy, Acting Executive Director

Office of the General Counsel

Toby Hemming, General Counsel

  • Sam Gifford and Elsie Loh, Assistant General Counsel
  • Jonathan Ciullo, Policy & Strategy, Director

Industrial Relations Victoria

Matt O’Connor, Deputy Secretary

Service Systems Reform

Lill Healy, Deputy Secretary

Jobs And Skills Exchange

Elizabeth Langdon, Deputy Secretary

Administrative offices

  • Local Government Inspectorate
  • Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel
  • Office of the Governor
  • Office of the Victorian Government Architect
  • Public Record Office Victoria
  • Service Victoria

Who we are

Find changes to the department, our groups, senior executives, administrative offices and other entities.

Changes to the department

On 1 January 2019 following machinery of government changes, DPC established the Fairer Victoria group. Fairer Victoria brings together the Office for Women and the Office for Youth from the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) with DPC's Veterans, Multicultural Affairs and Equality portfolios.

IRV also came across to DPC as part of the machinery of government changes from the previous Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources.

The machinery of government changes also involved functions transferring out from DPC. On 1 January 2019 the Latrobe Valley Authority, Melbourne Biomedical, Cities and Precincts, and GovHubs functions transferred to the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions. Likewise, the National Disability Insurance Scheme transferred to DHHS.

On 11 February 2019 the Countering Violent Extremism function transferred from DPC to the Department of Justice and Community Safety.

Later in 2018-19 DPC established the Service Systems Reform group to support the design and delivery of reforms that address issues of complexity and disadvantage, with a focus on place-based initiatives. The cross-government team looks at how government engages with communities and works in place to improve social and economic outcomes for Victorians.

Our groups

DPC consists of eight groups:

  • Economic Policy and State Productivity
  • Fairer Victoria
  • Governance Policy and Coordination
  • Industrial Relations Victoria
  • Jobs and Skills Exchange
  • Social Policy
  • Service Systems Reform
  • Office of the General Counsel

Economic Policy and State Productivity

The Economic Policy and State Productivity group works to support better economic awareness for Victoria by supporting the government to achieve its objectives related to economic development, regional and local government outcomes, international engagement, transport infrastructure, planning, priority precincts, energy, agriculture, resources and the environment. The group works in a whole of government environment by collaborating with relevant departments and agencies on policy and project development.

Fairer Victoria

Established on 1 January 2019 the Fairer Victoria group is responsible for advising the Premier, Cabinet and the ministers for Multicultural Affairs, Women, Youth, Equality and Veterans on policy and strategy aimed at embedding consideration of inclusion, access and social and economic participation for all Victorians in government programs, services and policy reforms. The Fairer Victoria group does this through:

  • taking a whole of government approach and collaborating with departments and agencies
  • providing high-quality strategic advice to the Premier, Cabinet and ministers
  • leading and contributing to best practice initiatives to ensure the needs of Victoria's diverse communities are considered

Governance Policy and Coordination

The Governance Policy and Coordination group is responsible for overseeing Cabinet management, digital design and innovation, public sector governance, performance and reform, security and emergency management, cybersecurity, government shared services, strategic communications, engagement and protocol, the Victorian Centre for Data Insights and DPC's corporate services. This group is also primarily responsible for supporting the Special Minister of State.

Industrial Relations Victoria

IRV is the government's lead agency for managing public sector industrial relations matters across Victoria and advising on relevant private sector matters. It works across government to develop regulatory and other solutions to meet the government's industrial relations policy aims and oversees public sector enterprise bargaining and dispute management. It also implements and ensures compliance with laws governing long service leave, child employment and small business owner drivers.

IRV works closely with industry and unions to promote positive industrial relations and to improve the working standards and conditions of all Victorians. It leads government responses and submissions to major workplace relations reviews and inquiries and regularly lobbies the Commonwealth for improvements to national workplace relations laws.

Jobs and Skills Exchange

The Jobs and Skills Exchange group is responsible for supporting a more agile, flexible and modern public service by providing a whole of Victorian government approach to workforce mobility.

The initial primary focus is on the VPS to enable an agile, responsive and high-performing workforce.

The group is also accountable to the Special Minister of State.

Social Policy

The Social Policy group works to provide better social outcomes for all Victorians by supporting the government to achieve its strategic objectives related to Aboriginal affairs, education, justice, family violence, health and human services. A newly created team will lead the government's preparation for treaty and negotiation of its framework in partnership with the Aboriginal representative body. Aboriginal Victoria also forms part of Social Policy, playing a central role in advancing the Aboriginal self-determination agenda and protecting cultural heritage.

Service Systems Reform

The Service Systems Reform group is responsible for overseeing a program of whole of Victorian Government policy development and reforms that aim to improve social and economic outcomes. The group's work has a focus on people who use social and justice services and uses place-based initiatives. As part of a cross-government virtual team, the group also supports the Victorian Secretaries' Board Service Delivery Reform subgroup. It will coordinate and guide conversations with communities about how government can better design its services and support communities to build on their strengths to achieve better social and economic outcomes.

Office of the General Counsel

The Office of the General Counsel (OGC) is responsible for providing legal and policy advice to the Premier, DPC's ministers, the DPC Secretary and the department. OGC advises on the full range of legal issues government faces, including in the areas of administrative, constitutional and corporate law. OGC's policy focus is on issues in the Premier's and the Special Minister of State's portfolios, principally in relation to Victoria's integrity and electoral systems. OGC also supports the department in developing legislative proposals.

DPC's senior executives

Secretary

Chris Eccles AO was appointed Secretary of DPC in December 2014. As Secretary, Chris leads the department and the VPS in advising the Premier and the Government of Victoria.

From 2011 to 2014, Chris was the Director-General of the New South Wales Department of Premier and Cabinet and from 2009 to 2011 he was Chief Executive of the South Australian Department of the Premier and Cabinet.

In 2017 Chris was made an Officer of the Order of Australia 'for distinguished service to public administration, to innovative policy development and sound governance, and to the delivery of reform in the areas of training, education and disability'.

Chris holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Laws from the Australian National University.

Deputy Secretary, Governance Policy and Coordination

Jeremi Moule was appointed Deputy Secretary, Governance Policy and Coordination in August 2018.

Previously, he was DPC's Executive Director of Strategic Communication, Engagement and Protocol. Prior to joining DPC Jeremi held the equivalent executive director role at the South Australian Department of the Premier and Cabinet, leading their communication, community engagement and citizen participation agenda.

He holds a journalism degree from the University of South Australia and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity

Tim Ada commenced in the role of Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity in April 2019.

Previously, Tim was Deputy Secretary of Jobs and Innovation in the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions, responsible for the strategic development of key industry sectors, including manufacturing, life sciences and international education and the delivery of telecommunications and employment programs.

Tim has a Bachelor and Master of Agriculture Sciences from the University of Melbourne. He grew up in rural Victoria.

Deputy Secretary, Social Policy

Kate Houghton was appointed Deputy Secretary of Social Policy in November 2018.

Kate has led many teams across a variety of portfolios within the VPS. Her most recent role was as Deputy Secretary of Police and Crime Prevention at the then Department of Justice and Regulation. Kate spent many years working within the natural resources and environment portfolio. She led the Water and Catchments group as Deputy Secretary and the Environment Policy Division as Executive Director.

Kate has an honours degree in economics, and a Master of Environment. Kate is an Institute of Public Administration Australia Fellow.

Deputy Secretary, Fairer Victoria

Brigid Monagle is the Deputy Secretary of Fairer Victoria, which oversees the Equality, Veterans, Multicultural Affairs, Women and Youth portfolios.

Brigid has previously worked as an executive director in DPC, leading advice in the areas of Aboriginal affairs policy, including treaty and
self-determination, health policy and reform, and inter-governmental strategy.

Brigid holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) from the University of Melbourne and a Master of Public Policy from Victoria University of Wellington.

Deputy Secretary, Service Systems Reform

Lill Healy was appointed Deputy Secretary, Service Systems Reform in June 2019. Her group is responsible for working in collaboration with other departments to support the design and delivery of reforms that address issues of complexity and disadvantage with a focus on place-based initiatives.

Lill was previously Deputy Secretary of Inclusion at the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions. Before that Lill held a variety of senior leadership roles in the VPS and across the private and community sectors.

Deputy Secretary, Jobs and Skills Exchange

Elizabeth Langdon is the Deputy Secretary at DPC overseeing the newly established Jobs and Skills Exchange.

Prior to this Elizabeth was Deputy Commissioner of the Victorian Public Sector Commission (VPSC). From July 2017 to January 2018, Elizabeth was Acting Victorian Public Sector Commissioner.

Elizabeth joined the VPS in 2005, spending eight years in DPC in policy and corporate leadership roles. Elizabeth then joined the Department of Health (now the Department of Health and Human Services) in 2013, where as Deputy Secretary, People, Capability and Oversight, Elizabeth was responsible for People and Culture, Legal Services, Communications and Media, and Executive Services and Oversight.

Deputy Secretary, Industrial Relations Victoria

Matt O'Connor was appointed Deputy Secretary, Industrial Relations Victoria in April 2015. Matt has worked in the Victorian Government since 2003. He has overseen the development of significant industrial relations legislative and policy reforms, including labour hire, long service leave and public sector employment protections. Matt has steered the Victorian Government's public sector industrial relations strategy through three rounds of enterprise bargaining and led the government's initiation of legal proceedings in the Fair Work Commission to protect the supply of essential services.

Matt has also represented the Victorian Government in consultations with the Commonwealth Government on federal industrial relations legislative proposals, including the Fair Work Act.

General Counsel

Toby Hemming was appointed General Counsel in May 2018.

Toby has significant experience in the Victorian public sector, having held senior positions in organisations including the County Court of Victoria, the Victorian Managed Insurance Authority and the Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority.

Toby holds degrees in the areas of law, arts and corporate governance. He is also a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and has completed the Senior Executive Fellows program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

Administrative offices

Administrative offices are established and abolished through orders under section 11 of the Public Administration Act, and each is established in relation to a department.

The following six administrative offices have been established in relation to DPC.

Local Government Inspectorate

The Local Government Inspectorate is the dedicated integrity agency for local government in Victoria.

Led by the Chief Municipal Inspector, the Inspectorate investigates offences under the Local Government Act 1989 and may examine, investigate and prosecute any matter relating to a council's operations or electoral matters.

Additionally, the Inspectorate conducts examinations of council governance processes and delivers a guidance and education program to improve the governance and transparency of operations across the sector.

Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel

The Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel transforms policy into legislation and advises the Victorian Government on its legislative program. The office is responsible for ensuring up-to-date public access to authoritative Victorian legislation. The Chief Parliamentary Counsel is also the Government Printer for Victoria, responsible for printing Victorian legislation.

Office of the Governor

The Office of the Governor provides support to the Governor of Victoria and her spouse in carrying out all aspects of their official duties for the benefit of the Victorian community. The Governor's role includes constitutional and ceremonial duties, community engagement and official municipal, regional and overseas visits - the latter as part of promoting Victoria's international engagement at the highest level.

Office of the Victorian Government Architect

The Office of the Victorian Government Architect provides leadership and independent advice to government about architecture and urban design and promotes awareness about how good design can make great places for people. The office encourages the creation of high-quality buildings and engaging public spaces that promote confidence and wellbeing in the community.

Public Record Office Victoria

The Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) maintains the archives of the State Government of Victoria, holding 100 kilometres of records dating from the mid-1830s to today. PROV manages these for use by the government and people of Victoria. PROV's collection contains records of decisions, events, people and places that have shaped the history of Victoria.

Service Victoria

Service Victoria is a whole of government service capability created to improve the way government transactions are delivered to Victorians and to deliver a more effective customer experience. Service Victoria brings together the most popular digital transactions in one place, making it simpler, easier and faster for Victorians.

Service Victoria is responsible for implementing the Service Victoria Act 2018 and provides customer service and identity verification functions.

Other entities

DPC supports the VPSC and the following special bodies and public entities in performing their functions and responsibilities.

DPC also works with a range of ministerial advisory bodies across our portfolio areas of responsibility.

Special bodies

Special bodies are defined in section 6 of the Public Administration Act and created under separate legislation:

  • Electoral Boundaries Commission
  • Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission
  • Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner
  • Victorian Electoral Commission
  • Victorian Inspectorate
  • Victorian Ombudsman.

Public entities

Public entities include statutory authorities, state-owned enterprises, state-owned corporations and formally constituted advisory boards that perform functions outside of the public service:

  • Family Violence Reform Implementation Monitor
  • Infrastructure Victoria
  • Labour Hire Licensing Authority
  • LanguageLoop
  • Office of the Public Interest Monitor
  • Portable Long Service Benefits Authority
  • Queen Victoria Women's Centre Trust
  • Shrine of Remembrance Trust
  • Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council
  • Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal
  • Victorian Multicultural Commission
  • Victorian Veterans Council.

Supporting our people

Promoting a culture of diversity and inclusion

DPC is committed to the principles of diversity, inclusion and equity to ensure people are treated with dignity and respect and can participate in all aspects of work-life to achieve their full potential. There is a place for everyone at DPC.

This commitment is demonstrated through workplace diversity and inclusion actions, plans and initiatives that help us to:

  • ensure equitable access to employment opportunities and outcomes for all people
  • raise individual consciousness and build competency to work with and manage diversity, inclusion and equity principles
  • engage with and reflect the communities we serve
  • provide an exemplary employee experience.

DPC has developed the Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2019-2021 in consultation with staff. The strategy aims to position DPC as a leader in the VPS by ensuring our culture and day-to-day practices are as inclusive as possible for all staff.

The strategy provides an opportunity to acknowledge and reflect on the real challenges and opportunities for people in a working environment that is not yet reflective of the communities it represents. In the implementation of this strategy, DPC will work towards:

  • improving the representation of women and people from diverse backgrounds in senior leadership positions
  • understanding and addressing any structural barriers to employment and potential employment due to personal circumstance or characteristic
  • mainstreaming diversity practices in our business and operational plans
  • establishing an accurate workforce profile and longitudinal data (evidence base) to measure and track performance
  • ensuring culture surveys consistently show safety, visibility and inclusion for all employees across all levels of the organisation
  • setting measurable targets and ensuring accountability for meeting our goals
  • continuing to elevate our reputation and public image as a diverse and inclusive workplace.

DPC continues to implement the following diversity plans under the strategy, some of which are expanded on further:

  • Aboriginal Inclusion Action Plan 2014 (refreshed strategy to be developed in 2019)
  • Disability Action Plan 2017-2020
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Gender Diverse, Intersex, and Queer and/or Questioning (LGBTIQ) Inclusion Plan 2019-2021
  • Gender Equity Plan 2018-2020
  • Cultural Diversity Inclusion Action Plan 2015-2018.

Aboriginal Inclusion Action Plan

DPC continued to promote Aboriginal inclusion with some key initiatives in 2018-19 including:

  • activities and events in recognition and support of dates of cultural significance including Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week
  • maintaining the Aboriginal employment target set out in the Aboriginal Inclusion Action Plan
  • delivering Aboriginal cultural awareness training
  • providing access to a tailored employee assistance program for Aboriginal staff
  • continuing to implement the Victorian Public Sector Barring Djinang Employment Strategy (a five-year plan) in collaboration with VPSC and the Community and Public Sector Union
  • implementing cultural awareness training.

Disability Action Plan

DPC's Disability Action Plan 2017-2020 provides a framework for DPC to ensure equitable access to employment opportunities for people with a disability.

Highlights during 2018-19 included the following:

n Implemented the 'Stay Engaged' work placement program for people with disability. The program provides people with disability who are over the age of 18 and not currently in employment or studying with the opportunity to experience a paid work placement in DPC for six weeks. The program aims to provide valuable insights into the role of a government department and builds capabilities suitable for a career in the public sector.

  • Continued our partnership with the Australian Network on Disability (AND). AND is a national, membership-based, for-purpose organisation that supports organisations to advance the inclusion of people with disability in all aspects of business.
  • Implemented disability confidence training for employees and managers.
  • Supported the VPS Enablers Network, a network run by people with disability for people with disability, to deliver a networking event with senior leaders across the VPS. The VPS Enablers Network aims to represent the needs, interests and concerns of Victorian government employees with lived experience of disability to ensure fair and equitable treatment.

LGBTIQ Inclusion Plan

The 2019-2021 LGBTIQ Inclusion Plan sets out clear and measurable strategies on how DPC will work towards achieving and sustaining an equitable and LGBTIQ-inclusive workplace. It builds on previous initiatives and actions that focused on LGBTIQ-inclusive employment practices, culture and leading LGBTIQ inclusion within DPC and across the Victorian public sector and the community.

DPC's highlights during 2018-19 included:

  • achieved bronze status in the Australian Workplace Equality Index - the national benchmarking instrument for LGBTIQ workplace inclusion for a third year in a row
  • appointed an executive sponsor for LGBTIQ inclusion and reinvigorated DPC's LGBTIQ Steering Committee
  • LGBTIQ staff indicated a positive and inclusive culture at DPC in the People Matter Survey
  • strengthened foundational policies to be more inclusive of our LGBTIQ employees
  • celebrated and commemorated significant days including International Day against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia, Wear it Purple Day, Bisexuality Visibility Day, Intersex Awareness Day and Transgender Day of Remembrance
  • conducted excellent community engagement and external advocacy
  • participated in the iconic Midsumma Pride March.

Learning and development

Our learning and development (L&D) strategies support capability development in identified priority areas. The objective is to develop a responsive and high-performing workforce so we can deliver on our strategic direction and priorities. In 2018-19 we set out to create a more contemporary approach to L&D, deliver improvements to the L&D function and enable people to successfully manage work and life commitments.


Five-year financial summary

Summary of factors that affected our performance in 2018–19 and the preceding 4 reporting periods.

Significant factors that affected our performance in 2018–19 and for the preceding four reporting periods are summarised below.

  • The increase in DPC’s income and expenditure in 2018–19 was mainly due to new government initiatives delivered during the year. These included the Pick My Project community grants initiative, multicultural community infrastructure programs and initiatives carried out through the Premier’s Jobs and Investment Fund. Separately, the special appropriation funding provided to the Victorian Electoral Commission also increased due to the November 2018 Victorian state election.
  • In 2018–19 DPC’s assets increased due to investments in modernising DPC’s office spaces and further investments in enhancing the Service Victoria online customer platform. DPC’s liabilities also increased during the year due to increases in payables and employee liabilities due to growth and machinery of government decisions where functions were transferred to DPC from other government departments.
  • In 2017–18 the increase in income from transactions and the increase in expenses from transactions relate to new government initiatives carried out during the year. The increase in total assets is mainly due to building the Service Victoria online customer platform.
  • The full-year impact of significant new initiatives affected DPC’s operations in 2016–17. Asset balances were impacted by asset revaluations during the year.
  • Machinery of government transfers affected DPC’s operations and balances in 2015–16. Asset balances were impacted by asset revaluations during the year.
  • Machinery of government transfers effective 1 January 2015 affected DPC’s operations and financial position in 2014–15, as well as the November 2014 Victorian state election.
Key financial indicators from 2014–15 to 2018–19

Departmental controlled activities

2018–19
$’000

2017–18
$’000

2016–17
$’000

2015–16
$’000

2014–15
$’000

Income from government

720,119

520,002

479,130

360,104

471,182

Total income from transactions

760,318

580,778

518,324

396,903

487,181

Total expenses from transactions

(750,323)

(573,028)

(496,796)

(371,506)

(475,706)

Net result from transactions

9,995

7,750

21,528

25,397

11,475

Net result for the period

8,583

7,966

22,195

24,946

11,547

Net cash flow from operating activities

35,134

15,980

33,375

20,720

9,571

Total assets

876,813

847,231

813,404

634,521

580,490

Total liabilities

116,711

90,268

77,749

62,796

57,681

The controlled activities of the department include all functions of DPC. They also include some portfolio entities of the department that are required to be included pursuant to a determination made by the Assistant Treasurer under section 53(1)(b) of the Financial Management Act 1994. These portfolio entities are:

  • Labour Hire Licensing Authority
  • Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner
  • Victorian Multicultural Commission
  • Victorian Veterans Council
  • Victorian Independent Remunerations Tribunal

Progress towards achieving departmental objectives

Outcomes we achieved during the year against our key initiatives and projects.

This section reports on the outcomes the Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC) achieved during the year against our key initiatives and projects to demonstrate the importance of these initiatives in DPC achieving our departmental objectives.

This section also reports on DPC’s progress for each departmental objective to demonstrate our contribution to the Victorian Government’s priorities to best deliver outcomes for the Victorian community.

Changes to the department during 2018–19

Effective from 1 January 2019, the Industrial Relations, Women and Youth ministerial portfolios and associated outputs were transferred to DPC due to machinery of government changes. DPC now has administrative responsibility for these outputs and we have therefore included them in our performance reporting.

These changes are summarised below:

2018–19 output 2017–18 output Reason for change
Industrial relations Industrial relations Transferred from the previous Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources (DEDJTR).
Women’s policy Gender equality and the prevention of family violence The gender equality component of this output was transferred from the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The family violence component has remained within DHHS.
Youth Youth affairs Transferred from DHHS.

The machinery of government changes came into effect following the November 2018 Victorian state election.

Departmental objectives, indicators and linked outputs

DPC’s medium-term objectives, associated indicators and linked outputs as set out in the 2018/19 Victorian Budget Paper No. 3 Service Delivery are shown below.

Objectives Indicators Outputs

Strong policy outcomes

DPC’s policy advice and its support for Cabinet, committee members and the Executive Council are valued and inform decision making

Quality infrastructure drives economic growth activity in Victoria

The development and effective use of technology supports productivity and competitiveness

  • Government-wide leadership, reform and implementation
  • Strategic advice and government support
  • Infrastructure Victoria
  • Digital government and communications
  • Office of the Victorian Government Architect
  • Industrial relations

Engaged citizens

Increased opportunities for participation by members of the Victorian community in the social, cultural, economic and democratic life of Victoria

  • Aboriginal policy, strengthening Aboriginal cultural heritage and communities
  • Multicultural affairs policy and programs
  • Support to veterans in Victoria
  • LGBTIQ equality policy and programs
  • Women’s policy
  • Youth

Professional public administration

A values-driven, high-integrity public service characterised by employees who collaborate across government and in partnership with the community and other sectors, and who use evidence to support decisions that drive the progress of Victoria socially and economically

  • Advice and support to the Governor
  • Chief Parliamentary Counsel services
  • Management of Victoria’s public records
  • Public administration advice and support
  • Public sector integrity
  • State electoral roll and electoral events

DPC's fourth objective - High-performing DPC - underpins all work of the department and therefore has no specific outputs or funding.


Strong policy outcomes - key initiatives

Strong policy outcomes - key initiatives - Department of Premier and Cabinet Annual Report 2018-19.

This objective pursues policy, service and administration excellence and reform. It leads the public sector response to significant state issues, policy challenges and projects. It supports the effective administration of government and the delivery of policy and projects that enable increased productivity and competitiveness in Victoria.

DPC’s outcomes on the following key initiatives have helped us achieve the Strong policy outcomes strategic objective.

Building a more secure youth justice system

DPC continues to support the government to build a modern and safe youth justice system through providing strategic advice on reforms to strengthen the custodial system to deliver rehabilitation, reduce recidivism and keep the workforce and community safe.

In 2018–19 DPC continued to provide the government with advice on developing the new youth justice centre in Cherry Creek.

Supporting social service system reform

Victoria’s family violence service system has undergone immense change in 2018–19.

DPC has provided strategic guidance on key 2018–19 family violence reforms including:

  • Establishing Respect Victoria, an independent statutory authority that is leading the delivery of two of the five pillars in Victoria’s family violence prevention strategy: Free from Violence - research and evaluation; and community engagement.
  • Dhelk Dja: Safe Our Way, the community‑led Aboriginal agreement developed to ensure that Aboriginal people, families and communities are living free from family violence.
  • Opening four The Orange Door sites in 2018–19. The Orange Door is a new way for adults, children and young people who are experiencing family violence or families who need assistance with the care and wellbeing of children to access the services they need to be safe and supported.
  • Everybody Matters: Inclusion and Equity Statement, which provides guidance for a more inclusive, safe and responsive family violence service system for more people, regardless of gender, ability, sexual orientation, sex, ethnicity, religion, age or mental health.

Several key elements of the reform have taken place and are starting to deliver improved responses for the Victorian community. DPC continues to play a key strategic role in connecting key activities and departments to achieve a successful family violence reform package, aligned with the Family Violence Outcomes Framework.

Monitoring and reporting on the Royal Commission into Family Violence recommendations

In 2018–19 DPC developed and coordinated the implementation of the Family Violence Reform Monitoring and Reporting Framework. The framework is designed to ensure consistent, centralised monitoring and reporting across government of how the Royal Commission’s recommendations are being delivered, as well as how broader reforms to Victoria’s family violence system are being implemented.

DPC reports quarterly to the Victorian Secretaries’ Board’s Subcommittee on Family Violence Reform about key reform projects and on the progress of the Royal Commission’s 227 recommendations. DPC also chairs an interdepartmental committee on family violence reform that supports the subcommittee in its role in providing oversight across the reforms. As at 1 January 2019, 120 recommendations have been implemented, with 107 recommendations currently in progress.

Making community safety a priority

In 2018–19 DPC supported the development of the Victorian Government’s Community Safety Statement 2019–20 and the first report on the Community Safety Statement outcomes framework, which was launched on 1 July 2019. The three Community Safety Statements cumulatively deliver a $3 billion investment in community safety through 3,135 new police, additional police facilities and resources, as well as law and order reforms.

DPC supported the establishment and launch of the Crime Prevention Taskforce, which will assist in shaping a new crime prevention agenda for Victoria.

DPC continued to provide advice on the government’s implementation of the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse including those relating to making communities and institutions child safe.

Negotiating City Deals with the Commonwealth and local governments

City Deals are a collaboration between the three levels of government to jointly harness strengths and drive economic growth and liveability improvements for communities. On 17 January 2018 the Victorian and Commonwealth governments signed a memorandum of understanding to work together on City Deals and on 11 March 2019 announced a Geelong City Deal.

DPC advised the Premier and lead Parliamentary Secretary on Victorian City Deal opportunities and coordinated the development of Victoria’s Geelong City Deal proposal, working across departments and with regional stakeholder groups. The Great Ocean Road visitor economy was agreed as a focus of the Geelong City Deal, with major investment to include the Geelong Convention and Exhibition Centre, the Shipwreck Coast Master Plan and the Revitalising Central Geelong Action Plan. The City Deal proposal was supported in the 2018/19 Victorian Budget, with a $153.2 million allocation for key projects.

Supporting future industries

Throughout 2018–19 DPC contributed to policy and program development to support the expansion of emerging and high-growth industries in Victoria. DPC administered the Premier’s Jobs and Investment Fund, which delivered projects that directly contribute to industry growth and job creation across key sectors in the state. DPC also supported the Premier’s Jobs and Investment Panel in its role in providing the Premier and government with expert strategic advice on economic development opportunities.

Supporting the implementation of the Roadmap for Reform

During 2018–19 DPC continued to support DHHS to implement the Roadmap for Reform: Strong Families, Safe Children to improve outcomes for vulnerable children, young people and families. This support included providing strategic advice to the government on reform directions and on implementing the $858.9 million investment from the 2018/19 Victorian Budget.

Key achievements in 2018–19 included: strengthening kinship care to improve outcomes for children and prevent entry into residential care; promoting the wellbeing and safety of children through introducing new Child Information Sharing legislation; and extending support for young people leaving out-of-home care through the Home Stretch program.

Securing a new national education agreement and making Victoria the Education State

Throughout 2018–19 DPC, together with the Department of Education and Training, worked to advance Victoria’s interests through negotiating the new National School Reform agreement for education. The Deputy Premier signed Victoria’s bilateral schools’ agreement on 17 June 2019. The agreement, which commenced on 1 February 2019 and will expire on 31 December 2023, establishes key funding and reform areas between Victoria and the Commonwealth.

Securing a new national health agreement

Throughout 2018–19 DPC, together with DHHS, has continued to advance Victoria’s interests through negotiating the new national agreement for health, which is due to come into effect on 1 July 2020.

Developing Asia capabilities

DPC partners with several organisations to achieve this initiative, including:

  • collaborating with Asia Society Australia to utilise its expertise and extensive networks to enhance Victoria’s connections to, engagement with and knowledge of Asia
  • continuing to work with the Australia India Institute to deliver a program that supports the objectives of Victoria’s India Strategy, including by building knowledge, understanding and connections between Victoria and India
  • working with ANZSOG on the 2018 India Advanced Leadership Dialogue to develop government-to-government links and deepen understanding between the Victorian and Indian public sectors

The Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (DJPR) also delivers a significant part of this initiative on behalf of DPC, including through the Asia Capabilities programs. See DJPR’s Annual Report for more information.

Supporting delivery of the Major Transport Infrastructure Program

DPC continued its work in 2018–19 with the Major Transport Infrastructure Authority, overseeing many of the major transport projects in construction, including Level Crossing Removal Project, Metro Tunnel Project, West Gate Tunnel Project and North East Link Project. The Victorian Government has 29 major transport projects in construction at an investment of $57 billion and the creation of more than 12,000 jobs.

DPC has also been a key participant in the establishment and continued operation of the Network Impact Management Plan Taskforce in coordinating and managing major construction and disruptions.

Cyber security strategy for better detection, prevention and response to cyber attacks on Victorian ICT systems

In 2017 DPC led the release of the Victorian Government’s Cyber Security Strategy 2016–2020 to improve the cyber resilience and governance in government and major infrastructure and service providers.

As at 30 June 2019, DPC led the delivery of 18 of 23 strategy action items, with three in progress. Key deliverables in 2018–19 were:

  • establishing the Cyber Incident Response Service
  • supporting more than 250 organisations on more than 600 cyber incidents
  • research to increase insights into the level of cyber incidents affecting government and critical infrastructure
  • working with the Victorian Electoral Commission to protect the integrity of the 2018 Victorian state election
  • consolidating multiple security contracts to achieve efficiencies

Data insights to enable better decisions and outcomes powered by analytics

In 2018–19 the Victorian Centre for Data Insights (VCDI) delivered technical and strategic advice and training across government to support improved policymaking and service design using data. VCDI partnered with departments and agencies to apply advanced analytics tools and techniques including machine learning, text mining, natural language processing and neural networks to identify and prioritise opportunities and risks across sectors including health, transport, justice and public safety.

As stewards of Victoria’s Data Reform Strategy, VCDI also provided tailored advice and coaching to embed a data-driven culture across the Victorian public service (VPS) and transform public sector data use to enable better outcomes.

Pick My Project

Pick My Project has given Victorian residents the opportunity to choose local community building projects for funding. It is an online $30 million community grants initiative that empowers Victorians to come up with project ideas and then vote for their favourite project ideas to be funded. DPC delivered a strong engagement process - exceeding both idea and voting targets - driving more Victorians towards accessible digital participation. DPC will continue to support and learn from delivering the 237 successful project ideas throughout 2019–20.

Service Victoria

During 2018–19 more than 404,000 people successfully used the Service Victoria online customer platform, with customer satisfaction at more than 95 per cent. Service Victoria cut the time for customers to complete a transaction by more than 25 per cent.

An additional seven transactions were built on the platform, including applications for the solar rebate program, which began on 1 July 2019. New features were also released to remove some of the final roadblocks to fully online services such as online identity verification and a digital licence pilot for recreational fishing licences in a new mobile wallet.

Promoting affordable, reliable and secure energy

Throughout 2018–19 DPC supported Victorian government departments and entities including the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning and Solar Victoria to develop key energy policy and program initiatives. These included:

  • launching the Solar Homes Program, which will bring solar panels, solar hot water or solar batteries to 770,000 homes over the next 10 years
  • securing 928MW of new large-scale renewable energy as a result of the Victorian Renewable Energy Auction Scheme
  • abolishing costly standing offers and setting a fairer price for electricity, known as the Victorian Default Offer, from 1 July 2019

Office of the Victorian Government Architect

The Office of the Victorian Government Architect (OVGA) led the following projects in 2018–19.

Joined the Victorian Government’s largest ever design-focused trade mission

Led by Creative Victoria, Melbourne was the official partner city for Business of Design Week 2018 in Hong Kong. The theme of Melbourne’s presence in Hong Kong was Think-Collaborate-Create, which captured Melbourne’s attitude to design excellence and inventiveness. At this international event the OVGA presented on liveability, sport and design, highlighting the OVGA’s sustained focus on design quality at Melbourne and Olympic parks.

Refreshed and broadened the skill base of the Victorian Design Review Panel

This initiative included specialists in structural design, housing, schools and Aboriginal cultural awareness - strengthening the panel’s position and ability to provide authoritative and expert design advice. In 2018–19 the panel reached another milestone with the review of more than 350 projects since its inception in 2012, continuing to provide constructive design review to improve the quality of design outcomes on significant projects across Victoria.

The Case for Good Design - A Guide for Government

In 2018–19 the OVGA completed work on this new publication. The Case for Good Design provides an overview of the evidence base that explores the benefits of well-designed places and the effect of poor design on members of the Victorian community.

Collaborate across government

The OVGA collaborated across the Victorian Government on significant projects to build a common understanding of design principles. The OVGA’s ongoing design stewardship of city-shaping projects such as the Melbourne Metro Rail Project, North East Link Project, Sunshine Health, Wellbeing and Education Precinct, Level Crossing Removal Project, Melbourne Arts Precinct Transformation and Public Housing Renewal Program ensures design quality is appropriately embedded and championed in the life cycle of projects.

Involvement in key projects with design excellence

The OVGA received industry support for its involvement in several key projects that have been awarded for design excellence. Projects included: level crossing removal projects such as Caulfield to Dandenong and Rosanna station; Swan Street Bridge Upgrade; Jock Comini Reserve Amenities; Frankston station; the new Members’ Annexe for Parliament House; the Port of Sale redevelopment; and the new South Melbourne Primary School.

Promote fair and equitable workplaces

In 2018–19 DPC’s Industrial Relations Victoria group provided support and advice for public sector bargaining matters, including approving 27 final agreements for public sector departments and agencies. Other ways DPC promoted fair and equitable workplaces in 2018–19 include:

  • assisted in finalising a major enterprise agreement for Victorian TAFE teachers
  • developed and implemented a revised wages policy and enterprise bargaining framework focused on the government’s operational and public sector priorities to deliver real benefits for the public sector and all Victorians
  • established the Labour Hire Licensing Authority to oversee the Victorian Labour Hire Licensing Scheme and developed regulations to support the scheme
  • supported passage of the Long Service Benefits Portability Act 2018 to provide portable long service benefits in the contract cleaning, security and community services industries from 1 July 2019 and drafted regulations to bring early childhood and disability services within the scope of the scheme from 1 January 2020
  • introduced the Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Amendment Act 2019 to assist owner drivers and forestry contractors by improving industry enforcement and compliance
  • commenced the Inquiry into the Victorian On-Demand Workforce to investigate the conditions of workers working in the ‘gig economy’, also called the ‘on-demand’ economy
  • led the Victorian Government’s participation in major Fair Work Commission cases including the annual wage review
  • developed the Women in Construction Strategy (implementation will begin in 2019–20) to support attraction, recruitment and retention of women in the building and construction industry
  • assisted the Equal Workplaces Advisory Council to develop gender equity principles
  • engaged Incolink to provide occupational health and safety training to businesses and workers in the building and construction industry
  • provided advice and support to assist businesses to implement new long service leave laws that provide greater flexibility to women, families and those transitioning to retirement
  • ensured protection of children working in Victoria by administering child employment laws, including assessing and issuing more than 11,200 child employment permits and undertaking 180 child employment investigations
  • finalised 99 investigations into breaches of long service leave laws and recovered more than $337,000 in outstanding long service leave entitlements for employees
  • provided critical industrial relations support and advice for the Victorian Government’s major building and infrastructure projects, particularly the Major Transport Infrastructure Program

Progress towards achieving the objective

The output performance measures that provide information on DPC’s progress in achieving the ‘Strong policy outcomes’ strategic objective are outlined below.

Objective indicator:DPC’s policy advice and its support for Cabinet, committee members and the Executive Council are valued and inform decision making

Unit of measure

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

2018–19

Number of briefs supporting Cabinet and Cabinet committee decision making

1,338

1,273

1,283

699

The 2018–19 actual is lower than the other years due to the caretaker period and 2018 Victorian state election, which resulted in an overall reduction in Cabinet and Committee activity.

Policy services satisfaction rating

90%

88%

90%

92%

Policy services timeliness rating

87%

80%

95%

97%

Objective indicator: Quality infrastructure drives economic growth activity in Victoria

Unit of measure

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

2018–19

Number of publications or discussion papers released (by Infrastructure Victoria)

6

10

9

7

Delivery of research, advisory or infrastructure strategies within agreed timelines

100%

100%

100%

100%

Strategic advice on significant public and private sector projects from project inception and procurement to design and delivery (by the Office of the Victorian Government Architect)

82

85

90

83

Stakeholder satisfaction with the quality of advice on significant public and private sector projects (with the Office of the Victorian Government Architect)

80%

83%

86%

80%

Objective indicator: The development and effective use of technology supports productivity and competitiveness

Unit of measure

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

2018–19

Victorian Government entities using the Standard User Experience Framework

nm

nm

11

24

Average monthly analysis reports generated to guide government decision making

nm

nm

42.5

75

Average number of monthly visits to www.vic.gov.au

244,104

285,590

317,612

356,362

Note: nm = new measure

Further details on DPC’s 2018–19 performance against its output performance measures are covered in the section Performance against output performance measures.


Engaged citizens - key initiatives

Engaged citizens - key initiatives - Department of Premier and Cabinet Annual Report 2018-19.

This objective supports and promotes full participation in strong, resilient and vibrant communities. It empowers citizens to participate in policymaking and service design. It ensures a holistic approach to social policy and service delivery.

DPC’s outcomes on the following key initiatives helped us achieve the Engaged citizens strategic objective.

The Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework 2018–2023

In October 2018 DPC launched the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework (VAAF) 2018–2023, developed in partnership with more than 600 Aboriginal Victorians. The VAAF is the Victorian Government’s overarching framework for working with Aboriginal Victorians, organisations and the wider community to drive action so all Aboriginal Victorian people, families and communities are healthy, safe, resilient, thriving and living culturally rich lives. Under the new VAAF, the number of measures has been expanded from 37 to 111 across six domains, including a new domain focused on culture and country. The new VAAF also formalises the Victorian Government’s commitment to self-determination. The first annual report on the new VAAF will be tabled in parliament in 2019–20.

Advancing Aboriginal self-determination and treaty

Since 1 July 2018, in partnership with Victoria’s Aboriginal community and the Victorian Treaty Advancement Commission (VTAC), DPC significantly advanced the treaty process in Victoria, including:

  • supported VTAC to establish the Aboriginal representative body, to be known as the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria
  • implemented the Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act 2018, Australia’s first piece of treaty-related legislation
  • prepared the State of Victoria to engage with the First Peoples’ Assembly to develop the architecture for treaty
  • continued the multi-award-winning communications campaign Deadly Questions to build public support for the treaty process
  • led the Treaty Community Engagement Program that supports Traditional Owner groups and other Aboriginal organisations to engage with their communities on treaty

African Communities Action Plan

The African Communities Action Plan was launched in April 2018 and includes more than 250 actions across six focus areas: business; employment; education; health and wellbeing; inclusion and empowerment; and leadership, cohesion and connection.

In July 2018 the Victorian Government committed $8.6 million over two years to begin implementing the action plan to meet the needs and priorities identified by the African community in Victoria.

Initiative objectives include: strengthening engagement with education; improving employment outcomes; responding to drug and alcohol misuse; and supporting communications and engagement with communities.

Multicultural Community Infrastructure Fund

Launched in 2018, the Multicultural Community Infrastructure Fund provides community infrastructure grants to maintain, refurbish and renovate places of cultural and religious significance. In 2018–19 DPC provided funding to 70 successful recipient organisations.

The Security Infrastructure Fund was also in operation during 2018–19. The fund was established as a one-off grant program in response to security threats experienced by Victorian Islamic and Jewish community organisations.

Multicultural Festivals and Events Program

The Multicultural Festivals and Events Program encourages community participation in festivals and events to celebrate and embrace Victoria’s vibrant multicultural diversity, build cross-cultural partnerships and develop community cohesion.

In 2018–19 $3.2 million in funding was provided to 778 recipient organisations.

Strengthening multicultural affairs and social cohesion

DPC further strengthened its policy advice in multicultural affairs and social cohesion through early work developing the Anti‑Racism Action Plan. Proposed as a long-term strategy to address racism and race-based discrimination in Victoria, the Anti-Racism Action Plan is a key commitment of the Victorian Government’s Multicultural Policy Statement.

In 2018–19 DPC completed two rounds of state-wide consultations to inform the development of the plan. In addition, nine Jewish and Muslim community organisations across Victoria were funded to deliver seven community-led initiatives seeking to respond to or prevent Islamophobia and antisemitism, including developing bystander awareness training.

Further development of the plan is currently underway, with $2 million allocated in the 2019/20 Victorian Budget.

Supporting asylum seekers and refugees

In 2018–19 DPC delivered a package of initiatives to support better settlement outcomes for refugees and asylum seekers, including a network of strategic engagement coordinators across Victoria. These coordinators are working to strengthen community engagement, social inclusion, economic participation and settlement outcomes, using tailored approaches based on the specific demographics and needs of regions. Other initiatives delivered through this package included: The Multicultural Sports Fund Program to increase multicultural communities’ grassroots participation in sport; supporting playgroups for newly arrived communities; and provided legal support for asylum seekers.

Translation services

In 2018–19 DPC continued work to improve multicultural communities’ access to interpreting services by supporting the interpreter workforce through training and professional development.

Creating jobs and supporting infrastructure for veterans

In 2018–19 DPC continued to deliver the Public Sector Veterans Employment Strategy. Since the strategy launched in June 2017 more than 380 veterans have been employed across the VPS. In March 2019 the government announced a tripling of the original target from 250 to 750 veterans employed in the public sector by June 2021. DPC has been promoting the skills veterans can bring to the public sector workforce and has developed programs to address barriers veterans face, including holding a workshop in February 2019 for veterans interested in public sector employment.

In addition, Jobs Victoria will deliver the Veterans Public Sector Employment initiative. The $280,000 pilot program will support 50 veterans into construction-based employment on major government infrastructure projects.

Supporting Victoria’s veterans

The Veterans Capital Works Major and Minor Grant programs provided 20 grants in 2018–19 totalling $1 million to fund critical improvements and enhancements to ex-service organisation facilities across Victoria.

In June 2019 DPC ran a veterans’ welfare information session, which connected ex-service organisations with Victorian Government services in areas such as family violence, substance misuse, mental health, housing and homelessness, disability support, legal advice and financial counselling. Regional information sessions will begin in 2019–20.

In early 2019 there were 42 finalists for the Premier’s Spirit of Anzac Prize. There were 22 prize winners who explored significant battlefields and sites of significance in Vietnam and Singapore, and 20 regional finalists participated in a three-day study tour of Canberra.

DPC supported the Shrine of Remembrance to commemorate the service and sacrifice of veterans, including Anzac Day and Remembrance Day services.

In 2018–19 DPC continued its support of the Victorian Veterans Council to assist the council to meet its objectives.

Pride Events and Festivals Fund

The Victorian Government established the Pride Events and Festivals Fund for LGBTIQ events in Victoria, which is intended to promote LGBTIQ arts and culture, celebrate diversity and acceptance, and build resilience against LGBTIQ discrimination. In 2018–19 the fund supported 50 events totalling more than $200,000. Events ranged from The Minus18 Queer Formal to the Swan Hill Pride Cup, with approximately 30 per cent of the events held in regional and rural Victoria.

Promoting full inclusion for all LGBTIQ Victorians

DPC delivers initiatives that promote full inclusion of all LGBTIQ Victorians. Initiatives delivered in 2018–19 include:

  • the LGBTIQ Rural and Regional Program
  • capacity building through the LGBTIQ Community Grants Program and the LGBTIQ Leadership Program
  • support for the development of the Victorian Pride Centre
  • LGBTIQ research, including the experiences of LGBTIQ people with a disability
  • support for LGBTIQ events and activities through the Pride Events and Festivals Fund

Supporting LGBTIQ Victorians in our healthcare system

The 2018/19 Victorian Budget included $3.4 million over four years to expand the Victorian healthcare system’s capacity to support trans and gender diverse people. DPC is working with DHHS on this initiative, which consists of three elements:

  • Establishing two new multidisciplinary gender clinics in Preston and Ballarat.
  • A state-wide training program for health professionals focused on inclusive and responsive health care to assist clinicians across Victoria to provide better services for trans and gender diverse Victorians.
  • A peer support program for trans and gender diverse Victorians. DPC has partnered with Transgender Victoria to create the program through co-design with the trans and gender diverse community. To start the process of designing the peer support program, a successful trans and gender diverse gathering was held in March 2019. More than 70 representatives from the trans and gender diverse community attended, laying the groundwork for the future of this program.

Supporting inclusive growth

DPC delivers the LGBTIQ Community Grants Program. The program fosters the development and growth of a sustainable and skilled LGBTIQ sector through supporting strategic business planning, skills development, infrastructure and systems development for LGBTIQ organisations. In 2018–19, 18 Organisational Grant recipients received a total of $700,000 towards these objectives.

Improving gender equality in Victorian communities

In 2018–19 DPC made significant progress in laying the foundations for gender equality in Victoria through the continued implementation of Safe and Strong, Victoria’s gender equality strategy. As at 30 June 2019 gender equality progress includes:

  • Victoria’s first Gender Equality Bill is under development. It is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reform policy and address cultural norms and attitudes and will address workplace gender equality, including the 11 per cent gender pay gap in the public sector.
  • Continued focus on promoting the role of women as leaders in the Victorian community. In March 2015 the government committed to a target of no less than 50 per cent of new appointments to paid government board positions being women. As of June 2019, 53 per cent of new paid board appointments are women.
  • Developed the Gender Equality in Victorian Sport and Recreation Pilot Program to trial gender equality guidelines in 10 sports organisations across Victoria. Participants have reported that the program is challenging gender stereotypes both on and off the sporting field.
  • The Victorian Government funded the Stella Prize, with DPC supporting the Stella Prize Board to develop gender-conscious reading lists. Five thousand of these resources are now in circulation, helping young people to read more critically and to become aware of the gendered stereotypes in the books they read.
  • Developed the Women’s Microenterprise Development Program in 2018–19, which Jobs Victoria is operating in Epping, Flemington, Wyndham, Dandenong and Ballarat. The early results are promising, with 32 women developing business plans and starting to build their own businesses.

Prevention of family violence policy and programs

In 2018–19 DPC continued to implement the Free from Violence: First Action Plan 2018–2021, which was launched in January 2018. The action plan highlights 33 key actions to deliver on the Free from Violence Strategy, which was launched in 2017.

Key initiatives and projects underway in 2018–19 include the following:

  • Continuing the Aboriginal Family Violence Primary Prevention Innovation Fund for 13 Aboriginal-led organisations to support innovation in preventing family violence in Aboriginal communities. One example is the Ballarat and District Aboriginal Co-operative delivering the Burron Guli (Boy to Man) Project which runs an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander father and son ‘healthy relationships’ short course over eight weeks.
  • Continuing the Free from Violence Fund, providing support to 21 organisations to deliver innovative prevention practice across rural, regional and metropolitan Victoria. The Grampians Pyrenees Primary Care Partnership is delivering the Grampians Pyrenees FARMher project, aimed at increasing awareness in farming communities of gender inequality and challenging gender roles and stereotypes through open discussion, the sharing of stories and providing peer support and leadership training.
  • Supporting 35 local governments to be leaders in prevention through the Local Government Free from Violence Grants Program. Casey City Council is delivering Embedding Change: Creating a Safe and Inclusive Casey, which includes designing and implementing a facility safety audit tool to improve the safety and inclusiveness of public spaces and council facilities for women and girls.

Strengthening youth engagement

The 2018/19 Victorian Budget committed $2 million over four years to fund a second round of the Empower Youth program, with five additional organisations funded to deliver programs through to 2021–22.

The Empower Youth program targets areas experiencing high social and economic disadvantage, where young people may be at greater risk of social isolation and disengagement.

Centacare Ballarat, South East Community Links, Whittlesea Community Connections, Swan Hill Rural City Council and Moorabool Shire Council were funded to engage youth workers to provide intensive, coordinated support to vulnerable young people to strengthen their health and wellbeing, their connection to community, their engagement in education and training and their pathways to employment.

Building community resilience through youth services

DPC has established Community Support Groups (CSGs) with South Sudanese communities in Dandenong‑Casey, Melton-Brimbank and Wyndham as part of the Victorian Government’s 2018–19 $15 million package to support better youth outcomes. The aim of the CSGs is to prevent and intervene early to stop young people being drawn to antisocial behaviour.

Local Reference Groups with representation from South Sudanese community members, including young people and women, together with local and state government representatives, are guiding the operations and activities of the CSGs to ensure they are addressing the needs of each local community.

The CSGs are connecting young people with employment opportunities, establishing after-school homework clubs and providing support to families in need. They are engaging large numbers of young people in sporting, social and recreational activities.

Improving place-based approaches to public policy

DPC is coordinating a whole of Victorian Government initiative that aims to see how the government can work differently to address entrenched disadvantage in some Victorian communities. It takes a strengths and place-based approach to build community and government capability to tackle persistent social and economic challenges.

In developing the initiative DPC’s focus is on geographical areas and among cohorts that access multiple government services. The work includes aligning service delivery reforms across Victorian Government departments, collecting site and cohort-specific data, and elevating individual and community voices in identifying reform outcomes. These activities have built an evidence base for future policy and program development to support government to work and collaborate with communities in place-based ways to achieve long-lasting change.

Progress towards achieving the objective

The output performance measures that provide information on DPC’s progress in achieving the ‘Engaged citizens’ strategic objective are outlined below.

Objective indicator: Increased opportunities for participation by members of the Victorian community in the social, cultural, economic and democratic life of Victoria.

Unit of measure

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

2018–19

Capacity-building activities provided for Traditional Owners and Aboriginal community organisations

20

22

20

17

Community consultations relating to treaty

nm

nm

14

72

Participation of Aboriginal people in Local Aboriginal Networks

2,449

2,297

2,336

2,507

Consultations with culturally, linguistically and diverse communities

74

62

110

92

Victorian population engaged by multicultural and social cohesion initiatives

nm

nm

76%

67%

Attendance at the Cultural Diversity Week flagship event, Victoria’s Multicultural Festival

50,000

55,000

35,000

50,000

Community engagement: Shrine ceremonial activities, public and student education programs, tours and general visitation

nm

nm

1,200,000

1,110,807

Number of veterans who apply for VPS positions

nm

nm

2,677

4,684

Number of people engaged with LGBTIQ equality projects and consultations

nm

13,828

9,871

6,000

Participation by young people in programs that provide opportunities to be involved in social and economic life in their communities

292,391

286,572

306,300

288,254

Participation by young people in programs that support young people to be involved in decision making in their community

2,890

2,569

4,222

3,044

Participants (youth) reporting development of transferrable skills that support education, training and vocational opportunities

96%

95%

97%

96%

Number of women participating in funded programs, projects and events

1,826

4,463

10,376

1,980

Percentage of women in new appointments to paid public boards

nm

nm

52%

53%

Note: nm = new measure

Further details on DPC’s 2018–19 performance against its output performance measures are covered in the section Performance against output performance measures.


Professional public administration - key initiatives

Professional public administration - key initiatives | Department of Premier and Cabinet Annual Report 2018-19

This objective fosters and promotes a high‑performing public service. It ensures effective whole of government performance and outcomes. It protects the values of good public governance in support of public trust.

DPC’s outcomes on the following key initiatives have helped us achieve the Professional public administration strategic objective.

Implementing security upgrades for government buildings

In 2018–19 the Office of the Governor completed a significant projects program, including security and conservation upgrade works. This program of works will continue into 2019–20.

Office of the Governor initiatives

In addition to constitutional and ceremonial duties, the Governor hosted a wide range of events in 2018–19, making Government House and grounds available in new ways for events, community programs and groups that might not have previously had the opportunity to visit Government House.

In 2018–19 the Governor undertook extensive international engagement on behalf of the state both locally and overseas. The Governor also attended numerous events and activities across Victoria.

Chief Parliamentary Counsel services

In 2018–19 the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel (OCPC) drafted a range of legislation to implement major government policy initiatives and reforms across a wide range of law, including the Environment Protection Amendment Act 2018, Firefighters’ Presumptive Rights Compensation and Fire Services Legislation Amendment Act 2019, Guardianship and Administration Act 2019 and Residential Tenancies Amendment Act 2018.

OCPC also drafted legislation to implement key professional public administration, electoral and integrity reforms including the Electoral Legislation Amendment Act 2018, Audit Amendment Act 2019, Integrity and Accountability Legislation Amendment (Public Interest Disclosures, Oversight and Independence) Act 2019 and Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal and Improving Parliamentary Standards Act 2019.

Other legislation drafted in 2018–19 has been to support the continued implementation of law and order and family violence reforms including the Corrections Amendment (Parole) Act 2018, Justice Legislation Amendment (Terrorism) Act 2018, Justice Legislation Amendment (Family Violence Protection and Other Matters) Act 2018, Prevention of Family Violence Act 2018, Victims and Other Legislation Amendment Act 2018 and Justice Legislation Amendment (Police and Other Matters) Act 2019.

Throughout 2018–19 OCPC continued providing drafting services to parliament to facilitate the passage of Victorian Government legislation, the preparation of House amendments and the introduction of Private Members’ Bills.

Securing public records by access to customised storage facility

During 2018–19 Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) has undertaken a redevelopment of internal work spaces to create additional storage capacity. This redevelopment will create an estimated 2,500 linear metres of new storage capacity.

PROV has also maximised current storage capacity through relocating parts of the collection to more appropriate storage solutions. During 2018–19 PROV installed additional shelving to its storage capacity, adding capacity for more than 3,000 flat maps and 650 linear metres of general-purpose storage capacity.

Planning has been completed to transfer 10,000 linear metres of records to the State Library Victoria storage facility in Ballarat. This transfer will occur in 2019–20.

The transfer of records from PROV’s Ballarat collection to the State Library storage facility has been completed. This will ensure the collection remains accessible to the public.

Establishing an independent remuneration tribunal

Parliament passed the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal and Improving Parliamentary Standards Act 2019 in March 2019. This established the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal (VIRT) to support independent and impartial decision making about Member of Parliament salaries and allowances and VPS (and prescribed public entity) executive salary bands.

VIRT’s first determination for Members of Parliament and VPS executive officers must be made by mid-September 2019, with VIRT’s first determination for executive officers employed by prescribed public entities to be made by mid-March 2020.

Fostering innovation in the public sector

DPC drives innovation activity across the VPS, directly engaging on programs and projects and building capability uplift in innovation methodologies.

In 2018–19 DPC supported the establishment of seven new Public Sector Innovation Fund projects, with a total commitment of approximately $2.5 million.

DPC also established the Agile Delivery Office in 2018–19. The office has provided agile coaching and customised advice to 44 project teams and delivered training and support to 588 members of the VPS.

In 2018–19 more than 6,000 additional members of the VPS joined the DPC-run Innovation Network, bringing total membership to more than 9,500. The Innovation Network’s resource-rich digital platform includes free workshops, news, toolkits, case studies and an accessible digital space for collaboration and communities of practice.

In February 2019 DPC held the VPS Innovation Immersion event, which brought together more than 500 participants from across the public service to attend practical workshops and keynote speeches to build innovation skills across the VPS.

DPC also fosters innovation by supporting the VPS to understand and apply behavioural interventions. In 2018–19 DPC delivered 20 behavioural insights workshops attended by approximately 850 staff and supported 40 behavioural projects from across the VPS.

Modernising and simplifying government’s online presence

DPC has been implementing the Single Digital Presence project since August 2017. This is an action of the Victorian Government’s Information Technology Strategy 2016–2020. DPC is:

  • consolidating the department’s content onto a single platform, making content publication easier and website builds faster and cheaper
  • organising associated events and training to enable skills uplift across the VPS in the areas of writing for the web, measuring content performance, content management system use and accessibility compliance.

In 2018–19 DPC redesigned and delivered vic.gov.au, the top domain for the Victorian Government. Fifteen DPC websites were combined onto vic.gov.au, including DPC’s corporate website.

Another eight DPC websites have been redesigned and moved to the platform. Fourteen more websites will be moved to the platform before February 2020.

Modernising and simplifying the government’s online presence helps Victorians to access, understand and act on Victorian Government policy and program information.

Driving a new information culture across Victoria through supporting the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner

Established as the primary regulator and source of independent advice to the community and the Victorian Government about how the public sector collects, uses and shares information, the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner (OVIC) has combined oversight of freedom of information (FOI), privacy and data protection.

In August 2019 OVIC measured the information security maturity across the VPS through the high-level protective data security plan attestation process, where 96 per cent of public sector bodies (that are subject to Part 4 of the Privacy and Data Protection Act 2014) submitted on time. OVIC also met with 60 government agencies to provide feedback on their submissions. OVIC aimed to educate these organisations on information security, encourage continuous improvement and foster a security culture across the public service.

OVIC supports the VPS to give effect to the right to privacy, educates the Victorian community about their privacy rights, and works towards achieving the objectives of the Privacy and Data Protection Act. In 2018–19 OVIC:

  • issued a new Privacy Impact Assessment template and accompanying guidelines
  • published Managing the Privacy Impacts of a Data Breach, a comprehensive guide to handling privacy issues
  • held a workshop about data breach response, attended by approximately 200 VPS employees
  • launched new information privacy awareness training targeting VPS agency staff.

Enhancing public sector integrity and governance capability through the Victorian Public Sector Commission

The Victorian Public Sector Commission’s (VPSC) initiatives to enhance public sector integrity and governance capability have included providing caretaker advice and support in the lead up to the November 2018 state election, the roll out of new guidance to support board performance assessments, including a dedicated series of workshops to regional agencies and boards, and the development of a comprehensive induction program for all VPS executives for implementation in 2019–20.

The VPSC has also led the development and adoption of consistent standards and guidance material for the VPS to address sexual harassment in the workplace through the Respectful Workplaces Framework and the Sexual Harassment Model Action Plan, which will be issued in July 2019.

Integrity system and public information reforms

In 2018–19 DPC supported the Special Minister of State to develop the following legislation to reform the integrity system:

  • The Integrity and Accountability Legislation Amendment (Public Interest Disclosures, Oversight and Independence) Act 2019 makes a range of improvements to the operation of the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission (IBAC), the Ombudsman and the protected disclosure system. Most of these improvements take effect from 1 January 2020.
  • The Audit Amendment Act 2019 modernises and simplifies the Audit Act 1994 , as well as making targeted improvements to the operation of the Act. These improvements began on 1 July 2019.

Leading whole of government freedom of information activities

OVIC has a key focus in promoting understanding and acceptance of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 across the VPS. Initiatives OVIC led in 2018–19 included:

  • publishing notices of decisions to promote increased openness and transparency of decision making
  • publishing proposed Professional Standards to enhance government agency practice
  • delivering professional development, training and education for FOI principal officers and practitioners (through face-to-face and e-learning modules)

In 2018–19 OVIC actioned recommendations from the 2017–18 review of business processes in privacy and FOI including implementing the ICT platform Resolve to streamline, integrate and enhance OVIC’s case management performance.

Progress towards achieving the objective

The output performance measures that provide information on DPC’s progress in achieving the ‘Professional public administration’ strategic objective are outlined below.

Objective indicator: A values-driven, high-integrity public service characterised by employees who collaborate across government and in partnership with the community and other sectors, and who use evidence to support decisions that drive the progress of Victoria socially and economically.

Unit of measure

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

2018–19

Education and training activities delivered by OVIC

27

42

73

109

Client satisfaction with data security and privacy training provided

99%

99%

98%

98%

Recommendations accepted by agencies upon completion of investigations by the Victorian Ombudsman

100%

95%

98%

98%

Further details on DPC’s 2018–19 performance against its output performance measures are covered in the section Performance against output performance measures.


High-performing DPC - key initiatives

High-performing DPC - key initiatives | Department of Premier and Cabinet Annual Report 2018-19

This objective pursues policy, service and administration excellence and reform. It leads the public sector response to significant state issues, policy challenges and projects. It supports the effective administration of government. It supports the delivery of policy and projects that enables increased productivity and competitiveness in Victoria.

DPC’s outcomes on the following key initiatives have helped us achieve the High-performing DPC strategic objective.

Cultivating leaders and embedding a culture of flexibility and wellbeing

Leadership

In 2018–19 more than 150 DPC VPS6 managers attended Leading Edge, a leadership development program designed specifically for DPC. Through Leading Edge DPC managers have been exposed to strategies, frameworks and tools to support the move from manager to leader. This program recognises the vital role managers play in shaping performance and culture and has supported participants to confidently exercise leadership for improved personal, team and organisational performance.

DPC has also supported more than 35 executive officers to participate in the Victorian Leadership Academy development program. The program supports our leaders to respond to public sector priorities and challenges with agile, innovative and courageous leadership. The program experiences are designed to challenge leaders to explore and apply new ways of thinking - leading and working to deepen their understanding of their role as a VPS leader in a service culture.

Flexibility

DPC recognises that flexibility is an essential part of a diverse, adaptive and high-performing workforce. This year we have continued to provide a range of flexible working arrangements to support and empower our people to successfully manage work and life commitments.

There is a genuine appetite among our people to embrace flexibility, so in 2018–19 DPC delivered a number of initiatives including education and awareness sessions and substantial digital upgrades within the workplace to better support our people to work in an agile and flexible way.

Wellbeing

A focus area for 2018–19 has been on mental health and wellbeing, with the continued implementation of the VPS Mental Health and Wellbeing Charter. Initiatives have included:

  • launching DPC’s Peer Support Program, which provides employees with access to local and trusted peers trained in psychological first aid and where they can reach out to the peers for confidential support for both work and non-work-related matters
  • tailoring of DPC’s mandatory Mental Health and Wellbeing training for executives, managers and staff to ensure it is practical and fit for purpose, and ready for roll out in 2019–20
  • continued promotion of positive wellbeing events and activities, including Health and Safety Month and Mental Health Week

Delivering diversity and inclusion initiatives

DPC is committed to promoting and embedding a diverse, inclusive and equitable workforce. In 2018–19 the Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2019–2021 was developed in close consultation with staff. The strategy aims to position DPC as a leader in the VPS, ensuring our culture and day-to-day practices are as inclusive as possible for all staff members.

Under the strategy, DPC has embedded a suite of diversity action plans focusing on Aboriginal employment, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity, people with disabilities, gender equity and the LGBTIQ community.

In 2018–19 DPC supported the activities of the VPS Enablers Network and key targets in the VPS Getting to Work Disability Employment Action Plan 2018–2025.

Developing a portfolio governance framework

DPC is in the process of developing a Portfolio Entities Governance Framework that will provide advice and support to portfolio entities on their relationship with DPC and on developing good governance arrangements. The framework is expected to be completed during 2019–20 and will touch on:

  • the differences between DPC administrative offices, portfolio agencies, and independent bodies
  • entities’ relationships with the department and the responsible portfolio minister
  • requirements for financial management, internal control, risk management and audit
  • internal structures and arrangements that support good governance, strengthen decision-making and promote accountability and transparency.

Modernising our business systems to create efficiencies

In 2018–19 DPC delivered a comprehensive upgrade of computing environment and primary communication system. All staff were migrated from Lotus Notes and a Windows 7 standard operating environment (SOE) to Windows 10 SOE and the latest Microsoft Office 365 suite of applications. The staged rollout saw more than 1,300 users, 350 shared mailboxes and 500 distribution lists moved onto a cloud platform.

Major business system efficiencies DPC delivered in 2018–19 included the following:

  • Implemented a new information classification framework in line with the Victorian Protective Data Security Framework, with the model set to be adopted by other departments.
  • Introduced ‘Go Connect’ to the DPC SOE to enhance workforce flexibility and mobility. This service enables seamless and secure connectivity, ensuring staff can access DPC systems and information and collaborate with others when working away from the office. ‘Go Connect’ was part of the highly successful Digital Office Upgrade project, which has delivered improved information security, better performance and enhanced flexibility, and is the foundation for ongoing modernisation of DPC’s digital staff experience.
  • Initiated the Human Capital Management (HCM) project with phase one to be delivered by October 2019 (Performance and Learning Modules), and phase two involving collaboration with stakeholders on the design of a whole of Victorian Government solution. Phase two will be delivered at a later date following extensive scoping and design of a whole of government solution (Recruitment, On-boarding and the core of the solution; Employee Central will be included in phase two). The HCM system will modernise and improve aged, standalone HR systems by consolidating them onto a centralised HR cloud solution aligned to the Victorian Government Statement of Direction.
  • Simplified our ICT hardware asset management through migrating all assets onto a single management platform. As part of our Business Continuity Plan, we developed a solution based on the Salesforce cloud platform that is already used, which supports timely and effective communications at scale. During an unfolding incident DPC staff can now be easily contacted via mobile messaging and updated in close to real time.

Performance against output performance measures

Our performance against our output performance measures.

The section provides information about DPC’s performance against our output performance measures. It provides comparison with our output targets that were published in the Departmental Performance Statement section of the 2018/19 Victorian Budget Paper No. 3 Service Delivery.

Commentary is provided where there are variances of more than 5 per cent between targets and actual results for performance measures.

Government-wide leadership, reform and implementation

This output provides advice and support to the Premier and Cabinet on all aspects of government policy. This involves advice on issues as they arise, policy coordination, research and analysis, consultation with stakeholders and leadership in long‑term policy development.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Whole of government emergency management forums, meetings and exercises facilitated [1]

number

20

16

–20%

Whole of government forums, meetings and advisory groups chaired [2]

number

80

85

6%

Data projects completed and delivered [3]

number

5

14

180%

Number of projects facilitated by the Behavioural Insights Unit

number

10

10

0%

Quality

Relevant communication activity compliant with government advertising and communication guidelines

per cent

100

100

0%

Data projects delivered to agreed outputs

per cent

> 80

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost [4]

$ million

163.2

119.8

n/a

n/a

Notes

[1] The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to events preceding the 2018 Victorian state election and a reduced requirement for special or emergency meetings.

[2] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to DPC’s increased role in managing whole of government events and meetings.

[3] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the increased demand for this service across the VPS.

[4] The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to machinery of government transfers to DJPR and DHHS effective from 1 January 2019.

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Strategic advice and government support

This output provides strategic policy analysis and advice to the Premier, leads policy development on key priority issues and supports informed government decision making.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Number of briefs supporting Cabinet and Cabinet committee decision making [1]

number

1,200

699

–42%

Establishment or renewal of ICT whole of government State Purchase Contracts [2]

number

5

7

40%

Victorian Government entities using the Standard User Experience Framework [3]

number

20

24

20%

Average monthly analysis reports generated to guide government decision making [4]

number

65

75

15%

Quality

Policy services satisfaction rating

per cent

90

92

2%

Timeliness

Policy services timeliness rating

per cent

95

97

2%

Timely delivery of state events and functions

per cent

100

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost [5]

$ million

106.0

97.7

–8%

Notes

[1] The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the caretaker period and 2018 Victorian state election, which resulted in an overall reduction in Cabinet and Committee activity.

[2] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to additional contracts being entered into ahead of initial forecasting.

[3] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to an increased opportunity to provide advice to agencies outside of DPC.

[4] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the expansion of services and datasets, which increased the demand across government.

[5] The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the reclassification of the Whole of Victorian Government Application Programming Interface from this output to the Digital Government and Communications output.

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Infrastructure Victoria

This output provides independent and transparent advice to government on infrastructure priorities and sets a long-term strategy for infrastructure investment.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Number of publications or discussion papers released [1]

number

6

7

17%

Quality

Stakeholder satisfaction with consultation process [2]

per cent

75

94

25%

Timeliness

Delivery of research, advisory or infrastructure strategies within agreed timelines

per cent

100

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost

$ million

9.9

10.1

2%

<=

Notes

[1] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to an additional publication relating to the upcoming 2020 Infrastructure Strategy Update.

[2] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to increased stakeholder satisfaction.

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

<= Performance target not achieved — within 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Digital government and communications

This output encourages innovative use of ICT to improve service delivery and business processes, and provides information and services to Victorian citizens and businesses through digital and other delivery channels.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Average number of monthly visits to www.vic.gov.au [1]

number

300,000

356,362

19%

Number of eligible ideas for Pick My Project [2]

number

2,000

2,299

15%

Total number of votes for eligible ideas for Pick My Project [3]

number

150,000

286,000

91%

Timeliness

Delivery of projects within agreed timelines

per cent

100

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost [4]

$ million

47.5

74.4

57%

Notes

[1] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to moving to a Single Digital Presence platform resulting in an increase to the average number of monthly visits to www.vic.gov.au.

[2] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to more Victorians engaging with the Pick My Project Pilot Program than initially estimated.

[3] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to more Victorians engaging with the Pick My Project Pilot Program than initially estimated.

[4] The 2018–19 actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the release of funding for Service Victoria held in central contingency. The budget was revised to $92.7 million. The funding is for the development of the Service Victoria online customer platform and the reclassification of the Whole of Victorian Government Application Programming Interface to this output from the Strategic advice and government support output. This increase has been partly offset by the timing of planned expenditure for Pick My Project, which has now moved into 2019–20.

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Office of the Victorian Government Architect

This output provides strategic leadership and advice to government and key stakeholders on architecture and the built environment.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Strategic advice on significant public and private sector projects from project inception and procurement to design and delivery [1]

number

60

83

38%

Quality

Stakeholder satisfaction with the quality of advice on significant public and private sector projects

per cent

80

80

0%

Timeliness

Average number of business days to issue formal advice [2]

days

10

7

30%

Cost

Total output cost [3]

$ million

1.2

1.2

3%

Notes

[1] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to an increased demand associated with input to state-significant public projects.

[2] The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to compressed timeframes associated with time‑sensitive and state‑significant public sector projects.

[3] The variance is due to rounding of the 2018–19 actual.

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Industrial relations

This output contributes to providing fair jobs and a positive industrial relations environment through sound industrial relations policy and advice to government. This includes oversight of enterprise bargaining across the Victorian public sector and support for Victoria’s participation in the national workplace relations system.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Education and awareness strategy developed to increase women’s participation in the building and construction sector

number

1

1

0%

Education and compliance inspections of providers/users conducted under the Labour Hire Licensing Scheme [1]

number

200

350

75%

Employers informed on OHS obligations under both state and Commonwealth legislation and regulations [2]

number

3,500

8,185

134%

Licence holders registered under the Labour Hire Licensing Scheme [3]

number

150

0

–100%

Workers informed about OHS obligations under both state and Commonwealth legislation and regulations [4]

number

40,000

93,277

133%

Workers registered under the Portable Long Service Leave Scheme [5]

number

5,000

0

–100%

Quality

Public sector agreements renewed and approved within the current enterprise bargaining framework

per cent

100

100

0%

Victoria represented in major industrial relations cases and inquiries

per cent

100

100

0%

Timeliness

Review and assessment of submitted public sector enterprise bargaining costings and proposed agreements completed and submitted for approval within four weeks [6]

per cent

85

93

9%

Cost

Total output cost [7]

$ million

13.5

11.7

n/a

n/a

Notes

[1] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the Labour Hire Licensing Authority facilitating additional information sessions in the lead up to the Labour Hire Licensing Scheme commencement in April 2019.

[2] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to a membership increase at the service provider, which occurred prior to significant infrastructure projects commencing.

[3] The 2018–19 full year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the application rate being lower than expected following the Labour Hire Licensing Scheme commencing in April 2019. As at 30 June 312 applications had been received and were yet to be processed because further information was required from the applicant.

[4] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to a membership increase at the service provider, which occurred prior to significant infrastructure projects commencing.

[5] The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the Portable Long Service Leave Scheme coming into effect on 1 July 2019. The target was set prior to finalising a commencement date.

[6] The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the implementation of a streamlined agreement approvals framework, which has resulted in proactive and coordinated responses for departments and agencies.

[7] On 1 January 2019 this output was transferred from the previous DEDJTR to DPC as part of machinery of government changes. The actual output cost only includes expenditure incurred since the transfer and excludes those incurred under DEDJTR.

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Aboriginal policy, strengthening Aboriginal cultural heritage and communities

In accordance with the government’s policy of self-determination for Aboriginal Victorians, this output protects and manages Aboriginal cultural heritage; strengthens Aboriginal community organisation; and builds community engagement to improve long-term social and economic outcomes for Aboriginal Victorians, including working towards treaty.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Award ceremonies held: Victorian Aboriginal Honour Roll

number

1

1

0%

Capacity-building activities provided for Traditional Owners and Aboriginal community organisations

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the reduction in activities over time due to managing the current and emerging needs of the Aboriginal sector.

number

20

17

–15%

Premier’s Gatherings and Community Consultations conducted

number

4

4

0%

Average weekly hours of case management provided to members of the Stolen Generations

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the provider achieving a higher average number of weekly hours of case management to members of the Stolen Generations.

number

80

129

61%

Number of family history investigations conducted by the Victorian Koorie Family History Service on behalf of members of the Stolen Generations

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to an increase in provider resourcing and experience, enabling more family history investigations to be conducted for members of the Stolen Generations.

number

240

296

23%

Delivery of the Victorian Government Aboriginal Affairs Report to Parliament

number

1

1

0%

Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council meetings conducted within legislative timeframes

number

6

6

0%

Community consultations relating to treaty

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the ongoing requirement and need to continue consultations across Victoria for the establishment of the First Peoples’ Assembly.

number

10

72

620%

Removal of first mortgages on titles of property owned by Aboriginal community-controlled organisations

number

8

8

0%

Quality

Funding payments for the Community Infrastructure program made in accordance with milestones

per cent

100

100

0%

Funding payments for Community Capacity and Co-Design made in accordance with milestones

per cent

100

100

0%

Funding payments for the Removal of First Mortgages initiative made in accordance with milestones

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to project delivery delays impacting organisations’ abilities to meet agreed milestones.

per cent

100

93

–7%

Funding payments for the Investing in Leadership and Governance initiative made in accordance with milestones

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the existing funding program failing to meet current and emerging governance needs of the Aboriginal sector.

per cent

100

22

–78%

Funding payments for the Cultural Strengthening initiative made in accordance with milestones

per cent

100

100

0%

Funding payments to strengthen the Cultural Heritage Protection and Management initiative made in accordance with milestones

per cent

100

100

0%

Funding payments for the Traditional Owner Settlement Scheme made in accordance with milestones

per cent

100

100

0%

Participation of Aboriginal people in Local Aboriginal Networks

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to delays, for a period during 2018–19, in attracting suitable candidates to coordinate the Local Aboriginal Network projects and programs.

number

2,800

2,507

–10%

Timeliness

Assessments completed by Aboriginal Victoria within the legislative timeframe: cultural heritage management plans

per cent

100

99

–1%

<=

Elections held in accordance with timelines agreed with the Victorian Treaty Advancement Commission

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the Commissioner extending out the election dates to occur between September and October 2019.

per cent

100

0

–100%

Koorie Heritage Trust initiative grants acquitted within the timeframe specified in the funding agreements

per cent

100

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost

The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to delays in completing treaty and self-determination initiatives and establishing the Munarra Centre for Regional Excellence.

$ million

58.2

48.1

–17%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

<= Performance target not achieved — within 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Multicultural affairs policy and programs

This output provides policy advice on multicultural affairs and social cohesion in Victoria — including settlement coordination for newly arrived migrants and refugees and delivers a range of programs to directly support multicultural Victorians — as well as supporting Victoria’s whole of government approach to multiculturalism. It includes the monitoring of government departments’ responsiveness to Victorians from culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse backgrounds.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Consultations with culturally and linguistically diverse communities

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to additional consultations being held with culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse community groups than initially forecast.

number

75

92

23%

Number of strategic and research partnerships that support portfolio outcomes

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to establishing partnerships at a greater rate than expected in response to community needs, as well as encouragement of partnerships through grants.

number

30

33

10%

Victorian population engaged by multicultural and social cohesion initiatives

per cent

67

67

0%

Quality

Attendance at the Cultural Diversity Week flagship event, Victoria’s Multicultural Festival

number

50,000

50,000

0%

Proportion of approved grant funding provided to organisations in regional/rural areas

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to a smaller than expected application rate from regional and rural communities to portfolio grant programs.

per cent

20

13

–35%

Cost

Total output cost

The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target predominantly due to machinery of government transfers to the Department of Justice and Community Safety effective from 1 January 2019.

$ million

84.6

73.9

n/a

n/a

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Support to veterans in Victoria

This output provides coordination of veteran‑related issues at the state level, especially in relation to Anzac Centenary commemorations and other major anniversaries. It includes commemoration, veteran welfare and education programs. This output supports the Shrine of Remembrance and the Victorian Veterans Council.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Entries received: Premier’s Spirit of Anzac Prize

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to receiving more entries through social media promotions.

number

250

370

48%

Community engagement: Shrine ceremonial activities, public and student education programs, tours and general visitation

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to higher participation than expected in one-time anniversary activities such as Remembrance Day, which marked the 100th anniversary of the Armistice.

number

750,000

1,110,807

48%

Number of veterans who apply for VPS positions

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to DPC’s active promotion to veterans of the Victorian Government as an employer of choice and DPC’s development of new programs to support veterans interested in applying for jobs in the public sector.

number

500

4,684

837%

Number of ex-service organisation training or information sessions delivered

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to scheduling delays and the need to undertake further consultation on providing the most suitable session for the veterans’ sector.

number

4

2

–50%

Quality

Commemorative and educative projects meet agreed project objectives

per cent

100

100

0%

Timeliness

Deliver an annual program of grants within agreed, published timelines

per cent

100

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost

The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the lower than planned carryover of funds from 2017–18.

$ million

10.5

9.1

–13%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

LGBTIQ equality policy and programs

This output provides for the delivery of programs and services to promote equality for LGBTIQ Victorians and support these communities’ economic, social and civic participation.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Number of people engaged with LGBTIQ equality projects and consultations

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to increased engagement in equality projects, events and consultations than initially forecast.

number

5,500

6,000

9%

Quality

Proportion of LGBTIQ grant program recipients who met or exceeded agreed outcomes

The 2018–19 target is unable to be reported due to a significant proportion of grant recipients still delivering on funded activities.

per cent

85

n/a

n/a

n/a

Funding for the Expanding Health System Capacity to Support Trans and Gender Diverse People initiative paid in accordance with the agreement

per cent

100

100

0%

Timeliness

Payments for events made in accordance with DPC milestones

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to processing all milestone payments for the Pride Events and Festivals Fund in 2018–19.

per cent

80

100

25%

Cost

Total output cost

$ million

19.5

20.1

3%

<=

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

<= Performance target not achieved — within 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Women’s policy

This output provides initiatives that support women and the prevention of family violence and supports the economic, social and civic participation and inclusion of all Victorians.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Number of meetings, forums and events held for Women and the Prevention of Family Violence consultation/engagement with key stakeholders

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to delivering additional program implementation activities with stakeholders.

number

51

126

147%

Number of women participating in funded programs, projects and events

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to events attracting a higher than expected number of participants.

number

1,500

1,980

32%

Percentage of women in new appointments to paid public boards

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to the program reaching maturity.

per cent

50

53

6%

Quality

Women and the Prevention of Family Violence service agreements and contracts deliver agreed outcomes for preventing family violence and for the social and economic participation of women

per cent

100

100

0%

Timeliness

Timely delivery of policy analysis and papers prepared

per cent

100

100

0%

Women and the Prevention of Family Violence projects and programs that support preventing family violence and the social and economic participation of women are delivered on time

per cent

100

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost

On 1 January 2019 this output was transferred from DHHS to DPC as part of machinery of government changes. The actual output cost only includes expenditure incurred since the transfer and excludes those incurred under DHHS.

$ million

16.2

13.7

n/a

n/a

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Youth

This output leads and coordinates whole of government policy advice and delivers a range of initiatives for young people aged between 12 and 25 to gain a range of skills and experiences and to actively participate in their local communities.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Participation by young people in programs that provide opportunities to be involved in social and economic life in their communities

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to more Victorian young people engaging with Youth affairs programs than initially estimated.

number

240,000

288,254

20%

Participation by young people in programs that support young people to be involved in decision making in their community

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to more Victorian young people participating in decision-making opportunities than initially estimated.

number

2,300

3,044

32%

Quality

Participants reporting development of transferrable skills that support education, training and vocational opportunities

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to more participants in the Advance school-based program reporting transferrable skills than initially estimated.

per cent

75

96

28%

Timeliness

Percentage of programs delivered within agreed timeframes

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to a higher proportion of programs delivered within agreed timeframes than initially estimated.

per cent

90

99

9%

Cost

Total output cost

On 1 January 2019 this output was transferred from DHHS to DPC as part of machinery of government changes. The actual output cost only includes expenditure incurred since the transfer and excludes those incurred under DHHS.

$ million

29.6

12.7

n/a

n/a

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Advice and support to the Governor

This output provides advice and support to the Governor, and maintenance to Government House and its collections as a heritage asset of national importance.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Increase in the annual number of guests and visitors to Government House

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to an increase in guests and visitors, which is continuing the Governor's commitment to make Government House more accessible to the community.

per cent

5

7

40%

Quality

Maintenance of Government House in accordance with the asset management strategy

per cent

77

77

0%

Standard, physical appearance of gardens and grounds are maintained in accordance with contract key performance indicators

per cent

85

85

0%

Timeliness

Support the Governor’s community engagement activities by arranging all internal and external events in a timely manner

per cent

100

100

0%

Cost

Total output cost

The 2018–19 target of $15.7 million was subsequently revised to $16.5 million to account for additional depreciation adjustments. Adjusting for this revision, the Office of the Governor achieved its target.

$ million

15.7

15.8

1%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Chief Parliamentary Counsel services

This output provides Bills for introduction in Parliament, including: provision of quality and timely legislative drafting services; hard copy and electronic publication of Acts and statutory rules; and the maintenance of a database of Victorian legislation and legislative information at www.legislation.vic.gov.au.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Formal advice provided on legislation

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to events preceding the 2018 Victorian state election and the commencement of the new parliamentary term.

number

450

387

–14%

Number of Acts and statutory rules published electronically and in hard copy without error

per cent

96

99

3%

Statutory rules made and Bills prepared and introduced into parliament

number

220

214

–3%

<=

Number of sets of House Amendments drafted for Members of Parliament

number

50

52

4%

Quality

Number of Bills and statutory rules drafted or settled that meet the required standard

per cent

96

97

1%

Timeliness

Bills and statutory rules drafted or settled within the required timeframe

per cent

96

100

4%

Electronically published versions of principal Acts and statutory rules published within three business days of coming into operation and new Acts and statutory rules published within 24 hours of making

per cent

96

96

0%

Cost

Total output cost

$ million

6.8

6.8

0%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

<= Performance target not achieved — within 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Management of Victoria’s public records

This output provides direction to government on the management of public records and ensures the historical memory of the Victorian Government endures, is secure and is accessible.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Collection usage: utilisation of physical and digital records held by Public Record Office Victoria

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to more records being available through third-party sites.

number

2,900,000

4,821,937

66%

Quality

Satisfaction with services provided by Public Record Office Victoria to government agencies and to the public

per cent

90

94

4%

Timeliness

Provision of services within published timeframes

per cent

95

98

3%

Cost

Total output cost

The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to revisions to the accounting treatment of public record assets where they are no longer considered a depreciating asset, thereby reducing depreciation expenses.

$ million

20.7

18.9

–9%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Public administration advice and support

This output provides advice and support on issues relevant to public sector administration, Members of Parliament and executive officer remuneration, governance, service delivery and workforce matters, as well as to public sector professionalism and integrity. It includes related research, determinations, data collection, reporting and dissemination of information.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Percentage of new executives participating in the VPSC induction program

The 2018–19 target is unable to be reported due to the program not commencing in 2018–19. The program is now scheduled for 2019–20.

per cent

75

n/a

n/a

n/a

Quality

Percentage of agencies who interacted with VPSC and who indicated VPSC advice and support assisted them to improve integrity capability

per cent

80

83

4%

Overall participant satisfaction with the Victorian Leadership Academy

The 2018–19 actual is significantly higher than the 2018–19 target due to increased participant satisfaction. VPSC research supports best practice in leadership development programs which has contributed to higher participant satisfaction.

per cent

80

97

21%

Overall satisfaction with engagement, consultation and responsiveness from the VPSC GRADS team

The increase in performance is due to VPSC’s refresh of the VPS GRADS program and expanded resourcing for the program, which has provided a higher level of service to graduate employees.

per cent

80

87

9%

Stakeholder satisfaction with the quality of advice from the Remuneration Tribunal on determinations

The 2018–19 target is unable to be reported due to the legislation establishing the Remuneration Tribunal being passed in March 2019. The tribunal’s first determinations are due in September 2019, which will allow this measure to be reported in 2019–20.

per cent

80

n/a

n/a

n/a

Timeliness

Proportion of data collection and reporting activities completed within target timeframes

per cent

100

100

0%

Advice from the Remuneration Tribunal provided within 15 working days of receipt of submission

The 2018–19 actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to efficiencies associated with greater use of electronic systems, which has resulted in advice being provided within set timeframes. The measure refers to the time for assessment of public entity submissions following receipt of DPC’s comments.

per cent

90

100

11%

Cost

Total output cost

The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to the reclassification of the Establishment of an Independent Remuneration Tribunal from this output to the Strategic advice and government support output.

$ million

11.8

10.0

–15%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Public sector integrity

This output provides independent oversight and investigations of complaints concerning corrupt conduct, police personnel conduct, administrative actions, local councillor conduct, alleged breaches of privacy and freedom of information. It enhances and protects data security, promotes integrity and transparency in government, and facilitates advice and education to the public sector on these matters.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

Corruption prevention initiatives delivered by the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission (IBAC)

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to increased engagement with Victoria Police and IBAC’s community awareness advertising campaign delivering additional resources.

number

90

99

10%

Education and training activities delivered by the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner (OVIC)

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to an increased agency demand for FOI training. OVIC has also been focusing on producing guidance material to support the VPS to develop a mature culture of public access.

number

100

109

9%

Jurisdictional complaints finalised — Victorian Ombudsman (VO)

The 2018–19 full year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to a greater number of complaints being finalised than initially forecast.

number

14,000

17,025

22%

Law enforcement, data security and privacy reviews completed

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to more reviews being conducted in 2018–19 than in previous years.

number

5

6

20%

Proportion of IBAC investigations into public sector corrupt conduct (excluding police personnel conduct and police personnel corrupt conduct) completed within 12 months

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to an increase in the number of ongoing complex investigations.

per cent

75

42

–44%

Proportion of IBAC investigations into police personnel conduct and police personnel corrupt conduct completed within 12 months

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to an increase in the number of ongoing investigations. Over half of the investigations conducted involved charges and disciplinary hearings, which extend the investigation timeframe.

per cent

75

33

–56%

Proportion of jurisdictional complaints independently investigated by the Victorian Ombudsman

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to a higher proportion of jurisdictional complaints being made to the Ombudsman and, in turn independently investigated, than initially forecast.

per cent

25

30

20%

Reviews and complaints completed by OVIC

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to increased productivity following improvement made to FOI business processes.

number

850

1,282

51%

Quality

Client satisfaction with data security and privacy training provided

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to high satisfaction with the OVIC's online privacy training module.

per cent

90

98

9%

OVIC applicants that appeal to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal

per cent

< 25

9

0%

Proportion of jurisdictional complaints where the original outcome is set aside by a review undertaken in accordance with the Ombudsman’s internal review policy

per cent

< 1.5

0.1

0%

Recommendations accepted by agencies upon completion of investigations by the Victorian Ombudsman

per cent

95

98

3%

Satisfaction rating with corruption prevention initiatives delivered by IBAC

per cent

95

99

4%

Timeliness

Complaints or notifications about public sector corrupt conduct (excluding police personnel conduct and police personnel corrupt conduct) assessed by IBAC within 45 days

per cent

85

85

0%

Complaints or notifications about police personnel conduct and police personnel corrupt conduct assessed by IBAC within 45 days

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to transitioning to a new case management system, which has affected response times. An increase in the volume of calls from the public and complex Victoria Police cases has also contributed to the result.

per cent

90

77

–14%

Complaints received by the Local Government Inspectorate assessed and actioned within five working days

per cent

95

93

–2%

<=

Complaints resolved within 30 calendar days of receipt by the Victorian Ombudsman

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to a combination of: the Ombudsman dealing with complaints in a way that ensures services are provided to the broadest possible range of people in an environment of increasing demand; dealing with new types of complaints prompted by changes to government operations; and an increase in the complexity of cases. This means some cases take longer. The Ombudsman introduced changes to how it triages and resolves complaints to help address this, resulting in improved performance for this target over recent years.

per cent

95

89

–6%

Responses within 15 days to written enquiries relating to the legislated responsibilities of OVIC

The 2018–19 full-year actual is higher than the 2018–19 target due to OVIC’s effective monitoring and management of privacy and data security enquiries and responses.

per cent

90

98

9%

Timeline agreed by FOI applicants for completing reviews is met

The 2018–19 full-year actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to focusing on the number of reviews completed and completing older reviews.

per cent

90

24

–73%

Cost

Total output cost

The 2018–19 actual is lower than the 2018–19 target due to lower than planned carryover of funds from 2017–18.

$ million

84.6

78.4

–7%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

<= Performance target not achieved — within 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

✗ Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

State electoral roll and electoral events

This output, through the Victorian Electoral Commission (VEC), provides a high‑quality electoral system that supports democracy in Victoria through the administration of an accurate and secure electoral roll, electoral services to ensure fair and equitable representation, the conduct of fair and impartial elections and encouraging greater participation in civic life through education and awareness activities and improving ease of access.

Performance measure

Unit

2018–19 target

2018–19 actual

Variance

Result

Quantity

State elections, municipal and statutory elections, by-elections, polls and electoral representation reviews

number

115

117

2%

Quality

Legal challenges to VEC conduct upheld

number

0

0

0%

Timeliness

Changes to electors’ details or additions to the Victorian Electoral Register are processed within set timeframes

per cent

95

97

2%

Cost

Total output cost

$ million

95.2

94.4

–1%

Results legend

✔ Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way


Financial statements

Financial statements for the financial year ending 30 June 2019 and the Accountable Officer’s and Chief Financial Officer’s declaration.

Download this document for the full financial statements, including:

  • Comprehensive operating statement for the financial year ended 30 June 2019.
  • Balance sheet as at 30 June 2019.
  • Cash flow statement for the financial year ended 30 June 2019.
  • Statement of changes in equity for the financial year ended 30 June 2019.
  • Notes to the financial statements for the financial year ended 30 June 2019.
  • Accountable Officer’s and Chief Financial Officer’s declaration.
  • Independent audit report for the year ended 30 June 2019.

Appendices including disclosure index

Appendices for budget portfolio outcomes, financial information, governance, workforce data, environmental performance and statutory compliance.

Download this document for the full appendices, including:

Disclosure index

Appendix 1: Budget portfolio outcomes

Appendix 2: Other financial information

Appendix 3: Governance

Appendix 4: Workforce data

Appendix 5: Environmental performance

Appendix 6: Statutory compliance and other information


Contacts

Contact information for the Department of Premier and Cabinet and administrative offices.

as at 30 June 2019

Department of Premier and Cabinet

Secretary

1 Treasury Place
Melbourne VIC 3002
(DX 210753)
(GPO Box 4912, Melbourne VIC 3001)
Telephone: 03 9651 5111
Email: dpc@dpc.vic.gov.au

Administrative offices

Local Government Inspectorate

Chief Municipal Inspector
Level 27, 1 Spring Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Telephone: 03 8392 5300

Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel

Chief Parliamentary Counsel
Level 2, 1 Macarthur Street
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Telephone: 03 9651 2109
www.legislation.vic.gov.au

Office of the Governor

Official Secretary
Government House
Government House Drive
Melbourne VIC 3004
Telephone: 03 9655 4211
www.governor.vic.gov.au

Office of the Victorian Government Architect

Victorian Government Architect
Level 2, 20 Spring Street
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Telephone: 03 9651 6583
www.ovga.vic.gov.au

Public Record Office Victoria

Director and Keeper of Public Records
Victorian Archives Centre
99 Shiel Street
North Melbourne VIC 3051
Telephone: 03 9348 5600
www.prov.vic.gov.au

Service Victoria

Chief Executive Officer
Level 10, 1 McNab Avenue
Footscray VIC 3011
www.service.vic.gov.au


Reviewed 21 October 2020