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Author:
Department of Premier and Cabinet
Date:
1 Nov 2023

Responsible body’s declaration

The Hon Jacinta Allan MP

Premier

The Hon Ben Carroll MP

Deputy Premier

The Hon Natalie Hutchins MP

Minister for Treaty and First Peoples

Tim Pallas MP

Minister for Industrial Relations

The Hon Danny Pearson MP

Assistant Treasurer

Dear Ministers,

In accordance with the Financial Management Act 1994, I am pleased to present the Department of Premier and Cabinet’s annual report for the year ending 30 June 2023.

(signed)

Jeremi Moule

Secretary
4 October 2023

Section 1: Year in review

About us

Our vision

The Department of Premier and Cabinet’s (DPC) vision is to be recognised and respected leaders in whole of government policy and performance.

Our mission

DPC’s mission is to support the people of Victoria by:

  • helping government achieve its strategic objectives
  • providing leadership to the public sector to improve its effectiveness
  • promoting collaboration across government to drive performance and improve outcomes.

Our values

DPC upholds the public sector values as enshrined in the Public Administration Act 2004 by demonstrating the following.

Accountability

  • Working to clear objectives in a transparent manner.
  • Accepting responsibility for our decisions and actions.
  • Seeking to achieve best use of resources.
  • Submitting ourselves to appropriate scrutiny.

Human rights

  • Making decisions and providing advice consistent with the human rights set out in the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act 2006.
  • Actively implementing, promoting and supporting human rights.

Impartiality

  • Making decisions and providing advice on merit without bias, caprice, favouritism or self-interest.
  • Acting fairly by objectively considering all relevant facts and applying fair criteria.
  • Implementing government policies and programs equitably.

Integrity

  • Being honest, open and transparent in our dealings.
  • Using powers responsibly.
  • Reporting improper conduct.
  • Avoiding any real or apparent conflicts of interest.
  • Striving to earn and sustain public trust of a high level.

Leadership

  • Actively implementing, promoting and supporting these values.

Respect

  • Treating others fairly and objectively.
  • Ensuring freedom from discrimination, harassment and bullying.
  • Using others’ views to improve outcomes on an ongoing basis.

Responsiveness

  • Providing frank, impartial and timely advice to the government.
  • Providing high-quality services to the Victorian community.
  • Identifying and promoting best practice.

Our objectives

DPC’s objectives are as follows.

Strong policy outcomes

  • Pursue policy and service delivery excellence and reform.
  • Lead the public sector response to significant state issues, industrial relations, policy challenges and projects.

First Peoples in Victoria are strong and self-determining

  • Improving outcomes and services for First Peoples through prioritising actions to enable self-determination, including advancing treaty, protecting and promoting cultural rights and responding to and engaging with the Yoorrook Justice Commission.
  • Address trauma and support healing; address racism established through colonisation.
  • Provide culturally safe systems and services and transfer power and resources to communities.

Professional public administration

  • Foster and promote a high-performing public service.
  • Ensure effective whole of government performance and outcomes and support the effective administration of government.
  • Protect the values of good governance, integrity and accountability to foster and maintain public trust in government.

Our ministers

Our ministers as at 30 June 2023

Premier of Victoria
The Hon Daniel Andrews MP

The Premier is Victoria’s head of government. DPC advises and supports the Premier and his portfolio.

The Premier is the main channel of communication between the Governor, as Head of State, and Cabinet, and between the Victorian Government and other state and territory governments.

The Office of the Governor, an Administrative Office within DPC’s responsibility, is also part of the Premier’s portfolio.

Contact details

1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Email:daniel.andrews@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website:www.premier.vic.gov.au

Deputy Premier
The Hon Jacinta Allan MP

Jacinta Allan

DPC advises and supports the Deputy Premier in her responsibilities for the Precincts and Land Coordinator General function that were established in DPC on 1 January 2023.

In addition to her DPC responsibilities, the Deputy Premier is the Minister for Transport and Infrastructure and Minister for the Suburban Rail Loop.

Contact details

1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Email: jacinta.allan@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: new.parliament.vic.gov.au/members/jacinta-allan/#appointments

Minister for Government Services
The Hon Danny Pearson MP

Danny Pearson MP

DPC advises and supports the Minister for Government Services and his portfolio on public sector administration and electoral matters. The Department of Government Services supports and advises the Minister on all other government services–related portfolio matters.

The Minister for Government Services is responsible for the following DPC portfolio entities:

  • Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel
  • Victorian Electoral Commission
  • Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal
  • Victorian Public Sector Commission.

In addition to his Government Services responsibilities, Minister Pearson is the Assistant Treasurer, Minister for WorkSafe and the TAC and Minister for Consumer Affairs.

Contact details

1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Email: danny.pearson@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.dannypearson.com.au

Minister for Industrial Relations
Tim Pallas MP

Tim Pallas MP

DPC advises and supports the Minister for Industrial Relations and his portfolio, principally through the team at Industrial Relations Victoria, who work towards achieving a positive working environment for all Victorians.

The Minister for Industrial Relations is responsible for the following DPC portfolio entities:

  • Labour Hire Authority
  • Portable Long Service Authority
  • Wage Inspectorate Victoria.

In addition to his DPC responsibilities, Minister Pallas is the Treasurer and the Minister for Trade and Investment.

Contact details

1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne VIC 3002
Email: tim.pallas@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.timpallas.com.au

Minister for Treaty and First Peoples
Gabrielle Williams MP

DPC advises and supports the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples and her portfolio. This includes oversight of DPC’s First Peoples – State Relations group, which focuses on promoting cultural rights, self-determination, treaty and truth.

The Minister for Treaty and First Peoples is also responsible for the DPC portfolio entity the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council.

In addition to her DPC responsibilities, Minister Williams is the Minister for Mental Health and Minister for Ambulance Services.

Contact details

50 Lonsdale Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Email: gabrielle.williams@parliament.vic.gov.au
Website: www.gabriellewilliams.com.au

Other Members of Parliament

Steve McGhie MP, Cabinet Secretary

DPC’s Cabinet Office provides support to the Cabinet Secretary for the operations of the Cabinet process and supports the Cabinet Secretary in his role.

Contact details

Email: steve.mcghie@parliament.vic.gov.au

Nick Staikos, Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier

Mr Staikos assists the Premier with his portfolio responsibilities.

Contact details

Email: nick.staikos@parliament.vic.gov.au

Website: www.nickstaikos.com.au

Organisational chart

DPC as at 30 June 2023

Organisational chart - DPC at 30 June 2023. Full description in text below image

Department of Premier and Cabinet

Secretary, Jeremi Moule

Office of the Secretary

Executive Director, Jane Gardam

Strategic Communications, Engagement and Protocol

Chief Communications Officer and Chief of Protocol, Fin Bird

Delivery and Strategy

Executive Director, Marcus Walsh

Acting Deputy Secretary, Jennifer Barton

Governance

Acting Executive Director, Maria Martino

Office of the General Counsel

Executive Director and Acting General Counsel, Miriam Holmes

Cabinet Office

Executive Director, Rachel Cowling

Industrial Relations Victoria

Deputy Secretary, Matt O’Connor

Private Sector

Executive Director, Lissa Zass

Public Sector

Executive Director, Jesse Maddison

Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations

Deputy Secretary, Emma Cassar

Families, Fairness and Housing, Justice and Community Security and Emergency Management

Executive Director, Lucy Toovey

Health and Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drugs, and Education

Executive Director, Ross Broad

Intergovernmental Strategy

Executive Director, Lauren Kaerger

Economic Policy and State Productivity

Deputy Secretary and Land Coordinator General, Jason Loos

Economic Development and International

Executive Director, Rob Holland

Economic Strategy

Executive Director, Heather Ridley

Energy, Resources and Environment

Executive Director, Matt Minchin

Infrastructure, Planning and Major Projects

Executive Director, Andrew Witchard

Precincts and Land

Executive Director, Emily Mottram

First Peoples – State Relations

Deputy Secretary, Elly Patira

Self Determination, Policy and Transformation

Executive Director, Ruth Barson

Traditional Owner Relationships and Heritage

Acting Executive Director, Matthew Lloyd

Treaty, Negotiations and Strategy

Lead Negotiators:

· Shen Narayanasamy

· David McAuley

Land Justice Unit

Executive Director, Dean Cowie

Portfolio entities

Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel

Office of the Governor

Victorian Electoral Commission

Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal

Victorian Public Sector Commission

Labour Hire Authority

Portable Long Service Authority

Wage Inspectorate Victoria

Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council

Changes to the department during 2022-23

On 1 January 2023 machinery of government changes took effect, following the November 2022 State Election, when the government decided to expand the number of Victorian public service (VPS) departments from nine to 10. This included the following changes for DPC:

  • The Digital Victoria group, the Corporate Services division and the portfolio entities Public Record Office Victoria, Service Victoria and Cenitex transferred from DPC to the new Department of Government Services to accelerate digital transformation and corporate services reform across the VPS.
  • The Social Services Workforce Reform team transferred from DPC to the Department of Jobs, Skills, Industry and Regions to better enable delivery of the government’s comprehensive workforce reform agenda.
  • The Office of the Victorian Government Architect transferred from DPC to the Department of Transport and Planning, consolidating skills to enhance integrated infrastructure planning and place-based outcomes.
  • Breakthrough Victoria Pty Ltd, and the $2 billion Breakthrough Victoria Fund of which DPC had policy oversight, transferred to the Department of Jobs, Skills, Industry and Regions to bring together the government’s industry and innovation portfolio and economic development portfolio functions.
  • The Land Justice Unit and Traditional Owner settlement function transferred from the Department of Justice and Community Safety to DPC to further consolidate functions relating to First Peoples at the centre of government.
  • A new Precincts and Land Coordinator General function was established in DPC. The team will work closely with the Department of Transport and Planning to create the enabling environment needed to deliver priority government projects that require land, and to deliver on the government’s vision for precinct development.

The Family Violence Reform Implementation Monitor and office concluded its work as of 31 May 2023, having been extended to the end of 2022.

Following machinery of government changes, DPC reduced from having seven groups to five groups, which are described below.

Our groups

DPC consists of five groups:

  • Cabinet, Legal and Governance
  • Economic Policy and State Productivity
  • First Peoples – State Relations
  • Industrial Relations Victoria
  • Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations.

The Cabinet, Legal, and Governance group delivers public sector legal, legislation and governance expertise and combines the Cabinet Office, the Office of the General Counsel (OGC) and the Governance Branch.

Through Cabinet Office, this group provides timely and practical guidance on the operation of Cabinet, Cabinet Committees and the Executive Council. This work supports government decision making and considers the issues that are most relevant to the state and the Victorian community.

OGC provides legal and policy advice, including in the areas of administrative, constitutional and corporate law. OGC’s policy focus is on issues in the Premier and the Minister for Government Services’ portfolios, principally in relation to Victoria’s public sector, electoral system and subordinate legislation. OGC advises on the government’s legislative agenda and supports DPC in developing legislative and regulatory proposals. It also manages the department’s freedom of Information and privacy functions.

Governance Branch unifies DPC’s efforts to promote good governance and public administration, high-quality decision and policymaking, government integrity and accountability, and trust in public institutions. It also supports the critical work of the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal.

Economic Policy and State Productivity

The Economic Policy and State Productivity group leads economic policy advice to the Premier and Cabinet. The group works in collaboration with relevant departments and agencies to ensure a coordinated whole of government approach to policy and projects in the areas of economic development; fiscal strategy; regional and suburban development; local government outcomes; regulatory reform; consumer affairs; gambling; racing; WorkSafe and TAC; insurance; government services; creative industries; tourism, sport and major events; industry and innovation; employment; skills, higher education and training; workplace safety; international engagement; trade and investment; infrastructure; planning; transport; energy; agriculture; resources; and the environment. The group also provides advice to the Deputy Premier on precincts and land coordination.

First Peoples – State Relations

The First Peoples – State Relations group was established in April 2021 and is responsible for an extensive program of nation-leading work in the areas of cultural rights, land rights, self-determination, treaty and truth with First Peoples. The group recognises Victoria’s First Peoples as the self-determining drivers of Aboriginal affairs in Victoria and is committed to building ongoing, just and respectful relationships between self-determining First Peoples and the State. The group performs statutory functions under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006 and works with First Peoples on cultural heritage management and protection in ways that recognise the leading role of strong and engaged Traditional Owners.

Industrial Relations Victoria

The Industrial Relations Victoria (IRV) group provides strategic industrial relations legislative, policy and technical advice to the government and departments. IRV develops and reviews regulatory frameworks to support a positive industrial relations environment and advocates for fair and productive workplaces, secure work and gender pay equity. IRV also oversees industrial relations matters and enterprise bargaining policy and processes across the Victorian public sector. IRV consists of the Private Sector branch, the Public Sector branch and the Office of the Deputy Secretary.

Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations

The Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations group provides advice on social policy matters including health, mental health, alcohol and other drugs, education, justice, community security, emergency management and families, fairness and housing. The group also leads oversight and coordination of whole of government intergovernmental relations matters.

Branches in the Office of the Secretary

In addition to the five groups above, the Strategic Communication, Engagement and Protocol (SCEP) Branch and the Delivery and Strategy Branch report to the Secretary.

SCEP provides specialist communication and protocol advice and support to the Premier and Ministry and DPC. SCEP’s work includes leading a coordinated approach to communication policy and practice across government, advising on communication and digital strategies, media and issues management, governance and oversight of all government advertising, advising on protocol matters and delivering major events of state significance, providing research, photography, video production services and media strategy and insights.

The Delivery and Strategy Branch tracks and supports delivery of priority government initiatives and works with policy branches to support strategic policy development of cross-portfolio issues. The branch comprises Delivery Tracking, which monitors implementation of government priority initiatives and commitments, and helps identify and resolve risks and blockages; Strategy, a project-based team that works closely with DPC policy branches and delivery agencies, employing consulting and strategy approaches to resolve priority policy and delivery issues, as commissioned by DPC senior executives or the Premier; and the Behavioural Insights Unit, which supports areas of government through research projects and providing advice to help them understand their users, identify problems and develop innovative solutions.

DPC's senior executives

Secretary

Jeremi Moule was appointed as the Secretary of DPC in October 2020. Before this role, Jeremi was Deputy Secretary of Governance Policy and Coordination at DPC, a position he held from August 2018.

Jeremi has held various executive positions in the Victorian and South Australian public services over a 17-year period. He started his career as a journalist and was the CEO of a registered training organisation. Jeremi lives in Bendigo and has worked extensively in regional Victoria.

He holds a journalism degree from the University of South Australia and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Toby Hemming was appointed as General Counsel in May 2018 and was the Deputy Secretary, Cabinet, Legal and Governance from July 2022 to April 2023, when he joined another VPS department.

Toby has significant experience in the Victorian public sector, having held senior positions in organisations including the County Court of Victoria, the Victorian Managed Insurance Authority and the Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority.

Toby holds degrees in the areas of law, arts and corporate governance. He is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and has completed Executive Fellows programs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and the Australia and New Zealand School of Government.

Jennifer Barton was Acting Deputy Secretary, Cabinet, Legal and Governance from April to June 2023. Jennifer substantively serves as Executive Director, Governance Branch, DPC.

Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity

Tim Ada was Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity until March 2023, when he was appointed as Secretary of another VPS department.

Tim began in the DPC role in April 2019. Previously, Tim was Deputy Secretary at the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions, where he was responsible for the strategic development of key industry sectors including manufacturing, life sciences and international education and for delivering telecommunications and employment programs.

Tim has a Master of Agriculture Sciences from the University of Melbourne.

Heather Ridley was Acting Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity from March to June 2023.

Jason Loos began in the role of Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity and Land Coordinator General in June 2023. Jason has a Master of Business Administration from RMIT and an honours degree in economics from Monash University.

Deputy Secretary, First Peoples – State Relations

Elly Patira was appointed as the Deputy Secretary of First Peoples – State Relations in April 2021. Elly is a lawyer and policy adviser with broad experience across constitutional, Indigenous and minority rights law and policy, both domestically and internationally. She holds a Bachelor of Arts and a JD (Juris Doctor) from the University of Melbourne and a Master of International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford.

Elly has held various executive positions in the Treaty and First Peoples portfolio at DPC. She previously worked as an academic, in the corporate sector, for Aboriginal organisations and as an adviser during the Fijian constitution-making process. As Deputy Secretary, Elly oversees an extensive program of priority work with First Peoples in the areas of treaty, truth and transitional justice, self-determination and cultural rights and protection.

Deputy Secretary, Industrial Relations Victoria

Matt O’Connor was appointed as the Deputy Secretary of IRV in April 2015.

Matt has worked in the Victorian Government since 2003. He has overseen the development of significant industrial relations legislative and policy reforms including wage theft, labour hire licensing, long service leave, child employment and gig worker supports.

Matt provides strategic input on a range of whole of government industrial relations matters. He has overseen the government’s participation in significant legal proceedings in the Fair Work Commission, including advocating for secure and fair employment through increases to the national minimum wage and a work value review of aged care workers. He also represents the Victorian Government in consultations with the Commonwealth Government on federal industrial relations legislative proposals, including amendments to the Fair Work Act 2009, with a view to maintaining fair and productive workplace arrangements for Victorian employers and workers.

Matt has led the implementation of the government’s public sector industrial relations strategy for several years and, more recently, played a pivotal role in developing enduring flexible working arrangements for the VPS and reviewing the Victorian public sector wages policy.

Deputy Secretary, Social Policy and Interdepartmental Relations

Emma Cassar was appointed Deputy Secretary, Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations in March
2023, following more than 20 years’ experience in local and international roles spanning government, private and
non-profit organisations.

Emma holds a Doctorate in Forensic Psychology from the University of Melbourne and began her distinguished career as a forensic psychologist with Corrections Victoria in 1999. She went on to become General Manager at several Victorian prisons and acted in various senior executive roles before becoming CEO of non-profit Open Family Australia in 2010 and State Director for Mission Australia from 2011 to 2013. A stint in the private sector saw Emma as Business Development Director of Serco Australia and then a number of years at KPMG as a Partner, leading the National Justice and Security sector.

Emma returned to Corrections Victoria in June 2018 as Commissioner. In July 2020 Emma took on the role of Deputy State Controller for the COVID-19 Accommodation program and at the end of 2020 was appointed COVID-19 Quarantine Victoria Commissioner.

Kate Houghton was Deputy Secretary, Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations until December 2022 when she was appointed Secretary of another VPS department.

Emma Catford was Acting Deputy Secretary, Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations from December 2022 to March 2023.

Administrative offices

Administrative offices are established and abolished through orders under section 11 of the Public Administration Act, and each is established in relation to a department.

DPC is responsible for the effective, efficient and economical management of the following administrative offices.

Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel

The Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel transforms policy into legislation, advises the government on its legislative program and drafts legislation for the government and the Parliament of Victoria. The office ensures up-to-date public access to authorised Victorian legislation and is also the Government Printer for Victoria, responsible for publishing legislation.

Office of the Governor

The Office of the Governor supports the Governor of Victoria in carrying out all aspects of their official duties for the benefit of the Victorian community. The office also maintains Government House and grounds as a unique heritage community asset.

The Governor’s role includes constitutional and ceremonial duties, community and international engagement, as well as official municipal and regional visits.

Other entities

DPC supports its ministers in their responsibilities for the Victorian Public Sector Commission and the following public entities and special bodies.

Public entities

Public entities include statutory authorities, state-owned enterprises, state-owned corporations and formally constituted advisory boards that perform functions outside of the VPS.

DPC supports the Minister for Industrial Relations and the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples in their responsibilities for the following public entities:

  • Labour Hire Authority
  • Portable Long Service Authority
  • Wage Inspectorate Victoria
  • Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council.

Special bodies

Special bodies are defined in section 6 of the Public Administration Act and are created under separate legislation. DPC supports the Minister for Government Services in his responsibilities for the following
special bodies:

  • Electoral Boundaries Commission
  • Victorian Electoral Commission
  • Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal.

Governance arrangements

Board of Management

The Board of Management comprises DPC’s senior-level executive officers who:

  • provide organisation oversight
  • provide strategic direction
  • ensure DPC is operating in a fiscally and environmentally sustainable manner
  • ensure DPC is meeting changing community needs and government priorities.

As of 30 June 2023 DPC’s Board of Management members are:

  • Jeremi Moule, Secretary
  • Jennifer Barton, Acting Deputy Secretary, Cabinet, Legal and Governance
  • Jason Loos, Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity and Land Coordinator General
  • Elly Patira, Deputy Secretary, First Peoples – State Relations
  • Matt O’Connor, Deputy Secretary, Industrial Relations Victoria
  • Emma Cassar, Deputy Secretary, Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations.

Audit and Risk Management Committee

The Audit and Risk Management Committee provides independent assurance and advice on the effectiveness of DPC’s financial management systems and controls, performance, stability, compliance with laws and regulations and risk management.

The committee reports to DPC’s Secretary and is established in line with the Standing Directions under the Financial Management Act 1994.

All members of the committee are independent.

As of 30 June 2023, the committee comprised the following members:

  • Geoff Harry (chair)
  • Andrew Whittaker
  • Rachel Thomson
  • Katie Williams.
Internal audit

In 2022–23 PricewaterhouseCoopers were DPC’s outsourced internal audit providers. DPC’s internal audit program comprises reviews of corporate functions and key compliance requirements, and tests internal controls that support DPC’s operating environment and management practices. The results of all audits are reported to executive management and to the Audit and Risk Management Committee, with progress of implementation of audit recommendations also reported to the committee.

Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee

The Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee is a consultative committee made up of DPC’s health and safety representatives and may also include first aid officers.

The committee has been established in line with the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004 to:

  • facilitate cooperation between the employer and employees in instigating, developing and carrying out measures designed to ensure the health and safety of employees in the workplace
  • assist formulation, review and dissemination to employees of policies and procedures relating to health and safety that are to be implemented and complied with at DPC
  • investigate any matter that may be a risk to the health and safety of people at DPC
  • review reported accidents and incidents and maintain DPC’s Occupational Health and Safety Risk Register, including risk ratings and controls
  • attempt to resolve any matter or request for DPC to conduct a review of the matter where no resolution can be determined
  • establish designated working groups to reflect the DPC working environment
  • ensure elections are conducted to fulfil the health and safety representative requirement across the department.

The committee members met half-yearly in 2022–23 to ensure any emerging issues were identified early to enable a timely and proactive response.

Procurement Governance Committee

The main responsibilities of the Procurement Governance Committee are to:

  • ensure strategic direction of procurement activities at DPC
  • provide governance and assurance to the Secretary and Board of Management through its oversight of procurement strategies, policies, procedures, practices and probity
  • ensure compliance with Victorian Government Purchasing Board supply policies and the Financial Management Act.

The Procurement Governance Committee members as of 30 June 2023 were:

  • Nicola Ramsay, Acting Executive Director, Corporate Services (chair)
  • Anthony Bale, Chief Financial Officer
  • Sam Gillespie, Director, WoVG ICT Strategic Sourcing and Digital
  • Kevin Duong, Acting Chief Procurement Officer
  • Lara Pasquale, Acting Chief Operating Officer.

Workforce overview

As a result of machinery of government changes affecting DPC in 2022–23, the total number of departmental employees now stands at 529.9 full-time equivalent as at 30 June 2023. The transfer of corporate services functions and Digital Victoria to the Department of Government Services, as well as the incoming transfer of the Precincts and Land Coordinator General function and the Land Justice Unit to DPC, has seen DPC’s workforce numbers change considerably from the previous year.

Machinery of government changes will also mean workforce data for the Office of the Victorian Government Architect, Public Record Office Victoria and Service Victoria will be represented in their respective lead department’s annual report for 2022–23.

The distribution of DPC staff across the VPS grades remains proportional to reporting in previous years, despite the large change in overall workforce numbers. The number of women in DPC has increased to 66 per cent of the total workforce compared with 58 per cent in 2022. Detailed workforce data tables are provided in Appendix 2.

Five-year financial summary

The following table summarises DPC’s financial results for 2022–23, with comparative information for the preceding four reporting periods. The information is prepared on the same basis as DPC’s financial statements in Section 3. Significant changes in financial position are noted below the table.

Key financial indicators from 2018–19 to 2022–23

Department-controlled activities

2022–23

$’000

(1)

2021–22

$’000

(2)

2020–21

$’000

(3)

2019–20

$’000

(4)

2018–19

$’000

(5)

Income from government704,136650,501607,413726,920720,119
Total income from transactions732,602694,868642,804818,062760,318
Total expenses from transactions(730,538)(675,126)(632,174)(825,276)(750,323)
Net result from transactions2,06419,74210,630(7,214)9,995
Net result for the period2,42821,98613,048(7,666)8,583
Net cash flow from operating activities17,06229,70635,59717,88335,134
Total assets351,4361,118,658881,214866,022876,813
Total liabilities52,688106,85895,703116,514116,711

Notes:

(1) The increase in 2022–23 income and expenditure is due to expenses associated with the State Election incurred by the Victorian Electoral Commission. The assets and liabilities decreased as a result of transfer of functions from DPC due to machinery of government changes effective from 1 January 2023.

(2) The increase in 2021–22 income and expenditure is mainly due to new government initiatives delivered during the year, including digital vaccination certification, business licensing initiative and the development of the Digital Victoria Marketplace. In addition, there is an increase associated with 2022 State Election readiness. Assets increased as a result of revaluation from formal valuation of property, plant and equipment. Department liabilities increased as a result of higher employee leave liabilities and provision for the early retirement packages announced during the year.

(3) The decrease in 2020–21 income and expenditure is mainly due to machinery of government changes where Fairer Victoria transferred from DPC to the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing on 1 February 2021, and Bushfire Recovery Victoria transferred to the Department of Justice and Community Safety from 1 July 2020. An increase in assets is driven by asset revaluations. Transfer of employee and supplier liabilities to the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing contributed to a decrease in liabilities.

(4) The increase in 2019–20 income and expenditure is mainly due to bushfire recovery activities and responses to the
COVID-19 pandemic. DPC’s assets decreased due to reductions in financial assets from using funding received in prior financial years and due to machinery of government decisions where functions were transferred from DPC.

(5) The increase in 2018–19 income and expenditure is mainly due to new government initiatives delivered during the year, including Pick My Project Multicultural Community Infrastructure programs and the Victorian Jobs and Investment Fund. Separately, there was increased income and expenditure due to the 2018 State Election. Assets increased due to investments in modernising DPC’s office spaces and further investments in Service Victoria’s digital services platform. DPC’s liabilities increased due to higher payables and employee liabilities because of growth and machinery of government transfers into DPC.

Section 2: Our performance

Progress towards achieving departmental objectives

This section reports on the outcomes the Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC) achieved during the year against key initiatives and departmental objectives.

Departmental Output changes during 2022-23

DPC made the following changes to its output structure as set out in the 2022–23 Victorian Budget Paper No. 3 — Service Delivery:

2021–22 outputsReason2022–23 outputs
Government-wide leadership, reform and implementationDisaggregation of output groups to more accurately reflect service delivery, improve accountability and better align with standard output practice across government.

Economic policy advice and support

Social policy advice and intergovernmental relations

Digital strategy and transformation

Executive Government advice and services

Strategic advice and government supportDisaggregation of output groups to more accurately reflect service delivery, improve accountability and better align with standard output practice across government.

Economic policy advice and support

Social policy advice and intergovernmental relations

Digital strategy and transformation

Executive Government advice and services

Digital government and communicationsRenamed to more accurately reflect service delivery.Digital strategy and transformation
Aboriginal policy, strengthening Aboriginal cultural heritage and communitiesDisaggregation of output groups to more accurately reflect service delivery, improve accountability and better align with standard output practice across government.

Self-determination policy and reform advice and programs

Traditional Owner engagement and cultural heritage management programs

Advice and support to the GovernorAggregation of output groups to more accurately reflect service delivery, improve accountability and better align with standard output practice across government.Executive Government advice and services
Public administration advice and supportRenamed to more accurately reflect service delivery.Public sector administration advice and support

Source: 2022–23 Victorian Budget Paper No. 3 — Service Delivery

Due to machinery of government changes effective 1 January 2023, the following departmental outputs transferred out of DPC:

2022–23 outputsNew department
Digital strategy and transformationDepartment of Government Services
Management of Victoria’s public recordsDepartment of Government Services
Office of the Victorian Government ArchitectDepartment of Transport and Planning

Departmental objectives, indicators and outputs

DPC’s medium-term objectives, associated indicators and linked outputs as of 30 June 2023 are shown below.

ObjectivesIndicatorsOutputs
Strong policy outcomes

Growth in economic investment and jobs.

Advice contributes to the achievement of government policies and priorities relating to economic and social outcomes, emergency management and industrial relations.

Economic policy advice and support

Social policy advice and intergovernmental relations

Industrial relations

First Peoples in Victoria are strong and self-determiningFirst Peoples in Victoria have increased control over decisions that impact their lives.

Self-determination policy and reform advice and programs

Traditional Owner engagement and cultural heritage management programs

Professional public administration

Support for Cabinet, committee members and Executive Council is valued and informs decision making.

Agency compliance with government advertising and communication guidelines.

Victoria’s electoral system is supported by an accurate and secure electoral roll, electoral services and conduct of fair and impartial elections.

Provision of high-quality advice to support evidence-based decisions that drive the progress of Victoria socially and economically as assessed by feedback from key stakeholders.

Provision of high-quality legislative drafting and publication services.

Advice contributes to the achievement of government policies and priorities relating to records management, Victoria’s electoral system, executive and parliamentary remuneration and public sector governance.

Executive Government advice and services

Public sector administration advice and support

Chief Parliamentary Counsel services

State electoral roll and electoral events

Strong policy outcomes — key initiatives

This objective pursues policy, service and administration excellence and reform. It leads the public sector response to significant state issues, policy challenges and projects. It supports the effective administration of government and the delivery of policy and projects that enable increased productivity and competitiveness in Victoria.

Outcomes on the following key initiatives have helped DPC achieve the ‘Strong policy outcomes’ strategic objective.

Established Precincts and Land Coordinator General function

Machinery of government changes that came into effect on 1 January 2023 established the Precincts and Land Coordinator General function in DPC to commission and coordinate precincts and coordinate and facilitate land acquisition across government. The functions have been established to help deliver the government’s jobs, housing and infrastructure agenda.

The Land Coordinator General is working across government to improve the use of government land to deliver better outcomes for the Victorian community. This is achieved through work to optimise the use and transaction of government land to support capital project delivery and other key objectives such as housing.

The Land Coordinator General function is also responsible for delivering a government land database to improve collection and use of data on government land.

The Precincts function will undertake precinct prioritisation to help achieve the government’s jobs, housing and infrastructure agenda though sequencing development of precincts as priority locations for growth in areas close to existing infrastructure and services. The Precincts function will work closely with delivery departments and agencies to achieve a whole of government and coordinated approach for precinct delivery.

Provided advice on current and future economic challenges and opportunities, including advice on measures to support Victoria’s economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic

In 2022–23 DPC continued to work closely with the Department of Treasury and Finance and other departments to support the government’s economic recovery following the COVID-19 pandemic and the October 2022 floods. This included advising on budget and fiscal strategy, industry recovery, employment, training and skills, higher education, consumer affairs, local government, transport policy and infrastructure delivery. Since the onset of COVID-19, DPC has actively supported the Victorian Government to identify and implement measures to assist businesses and individuals affected financially by the pandemic. DPC also prepared advice to support the returned government following the 2022 State Election.

Provided advice to support the government’s budgeting and financial management and efficient government operations

In 2022–23 DPC continued to work closely with the Department of Treasury and Finance to provide advice to government on its fiscal strategy and the annual State Budget process. This included advice on, and implementation of, budget efficiency measures.

Provided advice to deliver a renewable energy transition and emissions reduction; support delivery of the government’s environmental and agricultural priorities; and maintain the sustainable use of Victoria’s natural resources in a changing climate

In 2022–23 DPC provided advice and supported the Premier, other departments and entities to deliver the government’s energy, resources and environment commitments including:

  • reviving the State Electricity Commission, including work to identify and announce a Pioneer Investment by the end of 2023
  • developing an offshore wind industry for Victoria, including releasing Implementation Statements 1 and 2 and starting engagement on
    transmission planning
  • developing the Victorian Transmission Investment Framework and investment from the Renewable Energy Zone Fund in projects to strengthen and modernise the electricity grid
  • completing the second Victorian Renewable Energy Target auction (VRET2) and announcing the successful projects
  • advising on the Victorian Government’s decision to end native timber harvesting in Victoria’s state forests by 1 January 2024
  • formalising the interim emission reduction target of 75 to 80 per cent by 2035 and steps to legislate the bring-forward of Victoria’s long-term target for net zero emissions from 2050 to 2045
  • supporting Victorian energy consumers through two rounds of the $250 Power Saving Bonus for all Victorian households
  • supporting Victoria’s actions to prevent and prepare for incursions of biosecurity threats.

Supported delivery of the government’s infrastructure program and coordinated reforms to the transport network

In 2022–23 DPC continued to work with the Department of Transport and Planning and the Major Transport Infrastructure Authority on major transport projects in construction including the Level Crossings Removal Project, the Metro Tunnel Project, the North East Link Project, and the West Gate Tunnel Project.

DPC has also continued to work across government including with the Suburban Rail Loop Authority to progress the Suburban Rail Loop project. Highlights included starting initial and early works, tunnelling procurement and launching the Community Projects Fund.

DPC worked with the Department of Transport and Planning to deliver major commercial reforms including the new Public Transport Ticketing system contract, the Melbourne metropolitan tram franchise tender and the VicRoads modernisation — joint venture model for Registration, Licensing and Custom Plates.

DPC supported initiatives that plan for the future growth of Victoria, including collaborating with the newly established Land Coordinator General function to deliver infrastructure and integration of transport infrastructure projects, and precinct prioritisation and sequencing.

Supported delivery of the government’s industry and innovation agenda, including support for the newly established state-owned company, Breakthrough Victoria Pty Ltd, which is driving investment in commercialisation and jobs outcomes

In 2022–23 DPC supported the state’s industry and innovation agenda via a range of activities working in close partnership with other departments and state entities. This included:

  • providing advice to Breakthrough Victoria to support its establishment phase and investment readiness, with the company making several key investments into sectors like medical and quantum technologies
  • supporting the organisation and the Premier in Breakthrough Victoria’s operations as a state-owned company, including preparing and tabling its first annual report
  • supporting the transition of Breakthrough Victoria portfolio arrangements, including through updating the organisation’s constitution and statement of principles, and by providing specialist advice to the Department of Jobs, Skills, Industry and Regions.

Breakthrough Victoria was originally established by DPC in 2021 and reported to the Premier, with the Treasurer the sole shareholder on the state’s behalf. Following machinery of government changes, it now reports to the Minister for Industry and Innovation, with the Treasurer remaining as sole shareholder.

Provided advice to support the efficient operation of markets while maintaining appropriate protections for consumers

DPC has worked with departments to improve the design of government regulation to protect consumers while minimising costs on businesses and the community. In 2022–23 this included implementing support for consumers following the collapse of numerous residential builders, reforms related to domestic building and in response to construction cost pressures and various projects funded through the Regulatory Reform Incentive Fund. DPC continued to support changes to casino regulation in response to the Royal Commission into the Casino Operator and Licence and the wagering and betting licensing process.

Facilitated engagement with international stakeholders in Victoria and overseas, particularly by the Premier and Governor, that promote trade, foreign investment and other priority whole of government objectives

DPC has worked across government in
2022–23 to further Victoria’s international engagement objectives by:

  • supporting whole of government cooperation with key international partners to promote trade, investment and cultural and education ties that benefit Victorians, including by facilitating engagement between international dignitaries and the Premier, Governor and other Victorian leaders
  • collaborating with civil society partners, particularly Asia Society Australia and the Australia-India Institute, to enhance Victoria’s connections to, engagement with and knowledge of Asia
  • supporting foreign investment through the Victorian Jobs and Investment Fund.

Provided advice and coordination of strategic Victorian Government responses to the COVID-19 pandemic at both the state and national levels, including supporting the health system and Victoria’s policy approach to COVID-19 management across departments and agencies

DPC continued to play a key role in providing advice and coordinating strategic responses in the third year of the pandemic, working with departments to clarify roles and responsibilities in moving towards enduring response settings. Support was also provided to the Department of Health to establish a review panel to undertake a legislative review of the pandemic management framework.

DPC has continued to provide advice to government and work closely with the Department of Health on responses needed to support the recovery of Victoria’s health system from the significant disruption caused by the pandemic. This has included supporting oversight of the COVID-19 Catch Up Plan to deliver surgical care for Victorians who had surgery deferred because of the pandemic, as well as investments to improve health system performance including in workforce and infrastructure.

Advocated for Victoria’s interests in intergovernmental fora, including supporting the Premier at National Cabinet

In 2022–23 DPC led advice to the Premier and senior departmental officials to support their participation at National Cabinet and other senior officials’ forums. In the 12-month period, DPC supported Victoria’s engagement with the Commonwealth and jurisdictions at more than 70 intergovernmental meetings.
DPC also provided strategic policy advice and collaborated across government on National Cabinet reform matters and priority agreements including on health, skills, housing and energy, advocating for Victorian priorities and maximising benefits to the Victorian community. DPC co-led work on behalf of the First Secretaries Group for the Improving Care Pathways project and on health system reform, contributed to the review of Australian Federal Relations Architecture, and led reform work on behalf of the Council for the Australian Federation.

In total, DPC helped negotiate more than 30 agreements with the Commonwealth Government including the 12-month Skills Agreement, the Housing Accord and the Energy Bill Relief program.

Ensured strategic decision-makers are supported in their efforts to strengthen the disaster resilience and security of all Victorians, including through implementing the recommendations of state and national reviews and inquiries

In 2022–23 DPC continued to support implementation of reforms across the justice system, including criminalising the public display of Nazi symbols, introducing an affirmative consent model and providing better protections for victim-survivors of sexual offences. DPC also supported development of the government’s response to the Coronial Inquest into the Passing of Veronica Nelson and the Cultural Review of the Adult Custodial Corrections System. DPC has continued to support Victoria’s engagement in the National Redress Scheme for victim-survivors of child sexual abuse.

DPC has continued to support the modernisation of Victoria’s youth justice system by working with the Department of Justice and Community Safety to improve training and pay for custodial staff at Parkville Youth Justice Precinct and prepare for the opening of the state’s new youth justice precinct, Cherry Creek.

The new facility is set to take on the first cohort of young people in August 2023. Likewise, DPC has supported work to deliver modern, accessible court facilities for Victorians, including the new Bendigo Law Courts and Dandenong Children’s Court, which opened in 2023.

Through coordination and collaboration with all Victorian government departments, DPC has continued to strengthen emergency management arrangements and to support a strong reform agenda in response to several reviews and inquiries. These include the Parliamentary Inquiry into the 2022 Victorian floods and the Inspector-General for Emergency Management Review of Victoria’s water safety arrangements, along with supporting further implementation of recommendations from past reviews and inquiries.

DPC also supported decision making at the whole of government level in response to the October 2022 floods. This has enabled the Victorian Government, in collaboration with the Commonwealth Government and local councils, to implement immediate response, relief and early recovery activities for flood-affected people, families and communities.

Further, throughout 2022–23, DPC supported national counter-terrorism reforms through the Australia-New Zealand Counter-Terrorism Committee. DPC also supported reforms to tackle the early warning signs of radicalisation and violent and extremist behaviour, and the development of a Victorian Government response to the recommendations arising from the Legislative Council Legal and Social Issues Committee’s Inquiry into extremism in Victoria. DPC continued to provide protective security measures for government personnel and its information and physical assets through coordinating VPS personnel vetting and the Member of Parliament Protective Security Program.

Supported the Victorian Government to deliver critical social policy reforms, including Secondary Pathways Reform justice reforms, and implementing Best Start, Best Life reforms alongside the continued rollout of three-year-old kindergarten

DPC continued to play a key role in supporting the design and delivery of major education reforms in 2022–23. In the past year, DPC worked closely with the Department of Education to strengthen the education system, including:

  • continuing the rollout of the Disability Inclusion initiative, which supports students with disability to participate in education on the same basis as their peers
  • continuing the delivery of the Victorian Government’s school capital investment, including delivering 100 new schools by 2026
  • progressing the Senior School Pathways Reform agenda to provide greater vocational and applied learning opportunities for school students.

During 2022–23 DPC continued to inform the design and ongoing implementation of the Best Start, Best Life agenda. This includes making kindergarten free from 2023 and introducing a new year of universal Pre-Prep for four-year-olds. As part of this reform, DPC continued to support the establishment of 50 government-owned and operated Early Learning Centres in areas of unmet demand.

DPC also continued to support the rollout of universal funded three-year-old kindergarten, and in 2023 all services across the state were delivering between five and 15 hours of kindergarten each week.

Supported the ongoing delivery of the Victorian Government’s Big Housing Build to help increase the state’s social housing supply by 10 per cent in four years and support Victorians in need

In 2022–23 DPC continued to support Homes Victoria in delivering the Big Housing Build, including through key governance forums and ongoing engagement in policy reform. DPC co-chaired the Housing Interdepartmental Committee, supporting coordinated discussion of housing policy issues across key Victorian Government departments, and participated in a range of other governance forums across the housing portfolio. DPC will continue to support regular reporting on delivering the Big Housing Build to government, to support appropriate oversight and monitoring of this generational reform to the social and affordable housing system.

DPC supported engagement with the Commonwealth to finalise the National Housing Accord and Social Housing Accelerator Payment to further grow the pipeline of social and affordable housing in Victoria. DPC will continue to support Homes Victoria to deliver Victoria’s targets and commitments under these intergovernmental agreements, including supporting regular reporting to the Victorian and Commonwealth Governments on theprogress of implementation.

Supported the implementation of recommendations from the Royal Commission into Victoria’s Mental Health System to deliver a reformed and integrated mental health and wellbeing system with community at its core

In partnership with the Department of Health, DPC has continued to support a coordinated government response to the Royal Commission into Victoria’s Mental Health System. In the two years since the final report was tabled, work has begun on more than 90 per cent of the royal commission’s recommendations to set the foundations for Victoria’s future mental health system.

Key achievements in 2022–23 include supporting the introduction of the new Mental Health and Wellbeing Act 2022 and delivering six new Mental Health and Wellbeing Locals, with planning underway for more Locals across Victoria.

DPC also continues to work with the Department of Health to facilitate government-wide decision making to improve the mental health and wellbeing system, including through the Mental Health and Wellbeing Cabinet Committee, Mental Health and Wellbeing Victorian Secretaries’ Board Committee, Suicide Prevention and Response Victorian Secretaries’ Board Committee and Interdepartmental Committee on Mental Health and Wellbeing Promotion.

Drove co-operative and productive workplace relations in the Victorian public sector by developing and facilitating compliance with the Victorian Government’s industrial relations policy and overseeing the timely and efficient resolution of enterprise bargaining

In 2022–23 DPC provided leadership and industrial relations advice and support on public sector bargaining matters. This included assisting portfolio departments and agencies to finalise approximately 16 new public sector enterprise agreements under the previous wages policy before the caretaker government period began in November 2022. Following the 2022 State Election, DPC worked with the Department of Treasury and Finance to develop and support the implementation of the new wages policy, which was introduced in April 2023.

DPC worked with public service employers and other stakeholders to review, develop and publish 45 common policies to support the consistent application of the Victorian Public Service Enterprise Agreement 2020, as well as developing a range of other policy guidance material to support the effective administration of the public sector.

Delivered and supported policy and legislative reform that contributes to fair, productive and equitable Victorian workplaces in the private sector, including promoting gender pay equity

DPC continues to advocate for national laws that retain and enhance the strong protections and regulatory frameworks that exist in Victoria. During 2022–23 DPC engaged closely with the Commonwealth Government on proposed national industrial relations reforms and made key submissions, including on:

  • national wage theft laws
  • harmonised labour hire licensing laws (including agreeing to co-chair a national working group with Queensland)
  • gig worker reforms and protections for ‘employee-like’ forms of work
  • other measures including ‘Same job, same pay’, road transport industry minimum standards, unfair contracts and stronger protections against discrimination, adverse action and harassment in workplaces.

DPC has led the development of submissions to other significant legal proceedings and inquiries in the past year, advocating for:

  • increases to the national minimum wage under the Fair Work Commission’s Annual Wage Review process
  • increased protections for casual workers as part of the statutory review of the Fair Work (Supporting Australia’s Jobs and Economic Recovery) Act 2021.

DPC has also contributed to other whole of government submissions, including to the Commonwealth Employment White Paper, advocating for reforms to enhance job security, fair pay and conditions and to reduce the gender pay gap. DPC provided significant support to other government departments on projects including the Sick Pay Guarantee, operation of the Fair Jobs Code and establishment of the Apprenticeships Taskforce.

DPC provided industrial relations support and advice to the Public Sector Gender Equality Commissioner following the implementation of the Gender Equality Act 2020.

DPC provides the secretariat for the Equal Workplaces Advisory Council, which advises the Minister for Industrial Relations about initiatives to address the gap in women’s pay and workforce participation. The council worked with the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission to develop and launch a suite of education resources to help small-to-medium enterprises understand equal pay and why it matters.

DPC provides secretariat support to the Building Industry Consultative Council, which advises the Minister for Industrial Relations on economic and industrial relations issues affecting the building and construction industry.

DPC continued to oversee the:

  • implementation of the Women in Construction Strategy 2019–22, which seeks to increase women’s workforce participation in trade and non-trade roles — the strategy sets out a four-year work program with actions at three key points of intervention: attraction, recruitment and retention
  • delivery of the Building Equality Policy, which creates training and employment opportunities for women on government-funded construction projects valued at $20 million or more.


Promoted access to secure, ongoing and meaningful employment for Victorian workers

DPC continued work to implement recommendations of the Report of the Inquiry into the Victorian On-Demand Workforce including:

  • launching the Gig Worker Support Service to assist platform workers and businesses to understand entitlements and obligations, an Australian first of this kind
  • developing and implementing the Fair Conduct and Accountability Standards for platform businesses
  • advocating for improvements to federal laws to better protect gig workers.

Monitored significant public and private sector industrial relations matters and disputes and provided timely and strategic advice to government

DPC continued to work with industry stakeholders and to provide secretariat support to the Transport Industry Council and the Forestry Industry Council. In keeping with the requirements of the Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Act 2005, and in response to sudden and significant increases in fuel prices, DPC reviewed rates and costs schedules and published revised schedules in August 2022. These rates and costs schedules set minimum rates of pay for tip truck
owner-drivers working on government construction projects.

DPC has continued to work with the Victorian Public Sector Commission (VPSC) and VPS employers to implement flexible and hybrid working arrangements that promote inclusivity and diversity and support workforce participation.

Supported industrial relations portfolio agencies and authorities to deliver their legislative obligations, including in relation to wage theft, long service leave, labour hire, child employment and owner-drivers

DPC continued to support the industrial relations portfolio entities — the Wage Inspectorate Victoria, the Portable Long Service Authority and the Labour Hire Licensing Authority — to implement their regulatory responsibilities.

DPC works with the Portable Long Service Authority with respect to its responsibilities and functions under the Long Service Benefits Portability Act 2018. The Act established a portable long service scheme for workers in the community services, contract cleaning and security sectors. To date, more than 3,068 employers and 290,577 workers have registered for the scheme.

During 2022–23 DPC began a review of the portable long service scheme to consider whether the purpose and policy objectives of the Long Service Benefits Portability Actare being met, and a review of the Child Employment Regulations 2014, which sunset in June 2024. The review of the Regulations will ensure alignment with the amendments to the Child Employment Act 2003, with effect from 1 July 2023.

DPC also works with the Labour Hire Licensing Authority, the independent statutory body set up to administer the Labour Hire Licensing Act 2018. The Act establishes a labour hire licensing scheme to address exploitation in the labour hire industry. As at 30 June 2023, there were 5,227 labour hire licences in force in Victoria, including 922 licences granted in the period from 1 July 2022 to 30 June 2023.

Assisted Victorian workplaces to achieve enduring compliance with Victorian law covering wage theft, child employment, long service leave and contractors in transport and forestry

On 1 July 2021 the Wage Inspectorate Victoria was set up as an independent statutory authority under the Wage Theft Act 2020, which introduced criminal wage theft offences. The new authority also assumed responsibility for administering existing child employment, long service leave and owner-driver and forestry contractor legislation. In its second year of operations as a statutory authority, the Wage Inspectorate’s remit has grown to include promoting and enforcing compliance with the Child Safe Standards by those employers who employ children under the age of 15.

The Wage Inspectorate’s continuing compliance and enforcement work creates strong general deterrence to employer contravention of the laws within the Inspectorate’s remit. In 2022–23 the Wage Inspectorate delivered the following outcomes to ensure productive and prosperous workplaces for all Victorians:

  • protected the safety and welfare of children working in Victoria by administering child employment laws, including assessing and issuing 9,121 child employment permits, conducting 395 child employment investigations and proactive regulatory activities across the state
  • answered 13,248 calls about wage theft, long service leave, child employment and owner-driver laws through its helpline and responded to 1,845 written enquiries
  • finalised 144 long service leave investigations, helping to recover more than $1 million in outstanding long service leave entitlements
  • had 17 matters before a court, including the first criminal wage theft charges laid under the Wage Theft Act, as well as alleged breaches of the Long Service Leave Act and the Child Employment Act, and was successful in securing guilty verdicts against two employers (the remaining matters were still before a court as of 30 June 2023)
  • undertook regulatory responsibilities under the Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Act, including through proactive auditing activities focused on hirers of owner-drivers and checking compliance with the law for 248 individual drivers
  • continued implementing its
    three-year education strategy to raise awareness of workplace rights and obligations in Victoria and ran two major education campaigns, released educative videos and e-learning modules, engaged more than 200 stakeholders and translated information into
    nine languages.

Supported strong policy outcomes for First Peoples by driving whole of government policy and reform in the Treaty and First Peoples portfolio

In 2022–23 DPC continued to provide strategic social policy advice in Aboriginal affairs across the Victorian Government. This advice included supporting policy that promotes self-determined and equitable outcomes aligned with Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework commitments, treaty processes, responding to the Yoorrook Justice Commission, and commitments under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap. DPC also coordinated and advised on best practice engagement with Traditional Owners, whether formally recognised or not, ensuring the rights of Traditional Owners are respected and protected in government reform activities, and assisting Traditional Owner groups to achieve their self-determined aspirations.

Progress towards achieving the objective

The output performance measures that provide information on DPC’s progress in achieving the ‘Strong policy outcomes’ strategic objective are outlined below.

Objective indicator: Advice contributes to the achievement of government policies and priorities relating to economic and social outcomes, emergency management and industrial relations.

IndicatorUnit2019–202020–212021–222022–23
Gross state product (real) growth (per cent)(1)per cent0.1–0.35.62.75 (est.)(2)
Employment growth – Victoria – trend (per cent)(3)per cent3.15.23.33.9
Whole of government emergency management forums, meetings and exercises facilitatednumber8021813548
Employers informed on OHS obligations under both state and Commonwealth legislation and regulationsnumber18,2919,37512,63311,012

Sources:

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2021–22 financial year) Australian National Accounts: State Accounts, ABS website, accessed 6 August 2023.
  2. 2023–24 Victorian Budget Paper No. 2 — Strategy and Outlook.
  3. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2022–23 financial year) ‘Table 5: Labour force status by Sex, Victoria’ [time series spreadsheet],Labour Force, Australia, ABS website, accessed 6 August 2023.

More details on DPC’s 2022–23 performance against its output performance measures are provided on pages 49–59.

First Peoples in Victoria are strong and self-determining — key initiatives

This objective focuses on improving outcomes and services for First Peoples through prioritising actions to enable self-determination, including advancing treaty, protecting and promoting cultural rights and conducting a truth-telling process. It addresses trauma and supports healing; addresses the racism underpinning colonisation; and provides culturally safe systems and services. It also transfers power and resources to communities. DPC’s outcomes on the following key initiatives helped DPC achieve the ‘First Peoples in Victoria are strong and self-determining’ strategic objective.

Advanced Aboriginal self-determination and improved outcomes in line with the commitments made in the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework 2018–2023, the Self-Determination Reform Framework and the Victorian Closing the Gap Implementation Plan 2021–2023

In 2022–23 DPC undertook extensive engagement with government departments and Aboriginal Governance Forums to develop the Victorian Government Aboriginal Affairs Report 2022 before it was tabled in Parliament on 22 June 2023. The annual Victorian Government Aboriginal Affairs Report measures whole of government progress to improve outcomes for and with Victoria’s First Peoples, incorporating reporting against the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework, Self-Determination Reform Framework and Implementation Plan. DPC also updated the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework Data Dashboard alongside the Victorian Government Aboriginal Affairs Report to promote community access to statewide and local data.

DPC has continued to support the Partnership Forum on Closing the Gap, the government’s formal partner for Closing the Gap implementation, as required under the National Agreement on Closing the Gap. In 2022–23 DPC worked closely with the Partnership Forum to action key commitments under the National Agreement including Victoria’s Expenditure Review and establishing a combined Place-Based Partnership and Community Data Project.

Progressed the Victorian Government’s negotiation of treaty elements with the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria (as the representative body for Traditional Owners and Aboriginal Victorians) in line with the Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act 2018

In 2022–23 DPC took a momentous step towards treaty, delivering all the institutional elements required under the Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Actin equal partnership with the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria, including the following:

  • The Treaty Negotiation Framework was executed. The framework sets out the agreed rules and process for negotiating treaties between the State and First Peoples. The framework establishes a treaty process in Victoria that is inclusive and open to all First Peoples, as well as ensuring the protection of the existing legal rights of Traditional Owners such as native title. Unique to Victoria, the framework also requires all parties, including the State, to engage with the Aboriginal Lore, Law and Cultural Authority respectfully and in good faith.
  • The Self-Determination Fund was established. The fund is an independent financial resource to support First Peoples to achieve equal standing with the State in treaty negotiations and build capacity, wealth and prosperity for First Peoples. The State committed $65 million to the fund over three years and has made its inaugural transfer of $35 million. The First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria is required to administer the Self-Determination Fund independently of the State in a way that fairly and equitably benefits First Peoples.
  • The Treaty Authority was established. The Treaty Authority is an independent ‘Treaty Umpire’ consisting of five to seven members who will oversee and facilitate treaty negotiations to ensure a fair, effective and culturally strong treaty process. The Treaty Authority and Other Elements Act 2022 became law in August 2022 and supports the establishment and ongoing operation of the Treaty Authority. DPC has also progressed operationalising the Treaty Authority by jointly appointing the Treaty Authority Panel to select Treaty Authority Members, together with the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria.
  • DPC has led work across the Victorian Government to inform the State’s position in negotiating the treaty elements, including by coordinating a Treaty Interdepartmental Committee.
  • DPC has prepared the Treaty Annual Report as required under the Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act. The report outlines the work of the State in advancing the treaty process, ensuring the government is transparent in its work to advance treaty in Victoria.

Both the State and the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria are set to embark on the next phase of the landmark treaty process and begin formal treaty negotiations in late 2023.

Led the whole of government response to the historic Yoorrook Justice Commission, the first ever truth-telling inquiry into the historical and ongoing systemic injustices committed against Aboriginal Victorians since colonisation

In 2022–23 DPC played a pivotal role in coordinating the whole of government response to the Yoorrook Justice Commission. DPC progressed key activities to fulfil its role in meeting the State’s commitment to genuine, transparent and proactive engagement with the Commission including:

  • leading updates to the Commission’s Letters Patent to:
    • require an additional interim report on priority reform issues by 31 August 2023
    • extend the term of the Commission by 12 months
    • appoint a new Commissioner, Kerrupmara Gunditjmara Traditional Owner Travis Lovett
  • coordinating the State’s response to 26 Notices to Produce issued by the Commission under the Inquiries Act 2014
  • coordinating the drafting of two whole of Government submissions to the Commission on its criminal justice and child protection lines of inquiry, including a cover letter from the Premier (the submissions and letters made unprecedented apologies and acknowledgements, reflecting the spirit of truth telling)
  • leading implementation of operational recommendations made by the Commission, in consultation with the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria
  • coordinating the legal representation for the State’s response to the Commission
  • providing secretariat support for coordinating the State’s response to the Commission through the Yoorrook Justice Commission’s whole of government working group and the Interdepartmental Committee, governance groups that include members of all departments and Victoria Police
  • establishing a whole of government Community of Practice to support close collaboration of all departments and Victoria Police on policy responses and proactive engagement with the Commission’s inquiry
  • coordinating State witness preparation, culminating in the Commission’s questioning of 16 State witnesses from 27 April to 15 May 2023 — State witnesses included the Attorney-General, Minister for Police, Chief Commissioner of Police, Minister for Corrections, Youth Justice and Victim Support, Minister for Child Protection and Family Services, and senior public servants (State witnesses acknowledged the structural racism within the systems they are responsible for overseeing and the ongoing impacts of colonisation that continue to shape First Peoples’ interactions with these systems)
  • facilitating the independent process for selecting and recommending Commissioner Travis Lovett and supporting his appointment to the role on 6 March 2023.

Drove and supported strong cultural heritage management and protection including supporting Traditional Owners, maintaining the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Register and acquitting statutory functions under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006 such as activities to promote and enforce compliance

DPC continued to maintain Victoria’s
world-class Aboriginal cultural heritage management system, which is established under the Aboriginal Heritage Act. DPC
leads the regulatory, enforcement and approval processes under this system to protect Victoria’s significant Aboriginal cultural heritage.

The following statutory activities have taken place in 2022–23:

  • recording 835 Aboriginal places on the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Register, bringing the number of Aboriginal places recorded on the register to more than 40,000
  • making decisions on 53 cultural heritage management plans and seven amendments to plans prepared in parts of Victoria where Traditional Owners have not been formally recognised
  • issuing seven cultural heritage permits
  • making decisions on 70 preliminary Aboriginal heritage tests, which provide developers and land users certainty about whether a cultural heritage management plan is required for a proposed activity.

Support was provided to Registered Aboriginal Parties (RAPs) to carry out their functions under the Aboriginal Heritage Act, administering 16 capacity development projects to Traditional Owner organisations to support their protection and management of cultural heritage. This included training in identifying and recording archaeological sites and Aboriginal cultural places.

DPC also delivered its Certificate IV in Cultural Heritage Management to Aboriginal students through its partnership with La Trobe University and administered two cultural heritage management workshops to Aboriginal people interested in pursuing a career in Aboriginal cultural heritage management.

DPC supported two Registered Aboriginal Party forums, providing RAPs opportunities to share knowledge and improve protection outcomes for Aboriginal heritage across the state.

DPC has undertaken its enforcement and compliance responsibilities this year. This has included:

  • 109 investigations into reports of noncompliance with the Aboriginal Heritage Act across Victoria
  • two prosecutions for harming Aboriginal cultural heritage.

DPC also continued to lead a proactive enforcement and compliance strategy, preventing the occurrence of offences under the Act and leading greater ongoing compliance and protection of Aboriginal heritage.

DPC continued to support Traditional Owners to better protect Victoria’s most significant Aboriginal cultural heritage places. This included supporting the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples’ decision to make an Ongoing Protection Declaration over Ghow Swamp Aboriginal Place in northern Victoria. DPC also progressed development of Ongoing Protection Declarations at other significant Victorian Aboriginal places.

DPC has worked in partnership with Traditional Owners to ensure significant Aboriginal cultural heritage is protected and appropriately managed by major development projects carried out in Victoria. This includes working with Traditional Owners and partner agencies to ensure Aboriginal places would be protected during construction of water infrastructure along the Murray River as part of the Victorian Murray Floodplain Restoration Project. DPC has also been working with Traditional Owners, partner agencies and the Commonwealth Government to consider how Aboriginal heritage values can be managed by proposed offshore development projects in the waters south of Victoria.

Delivered the Aboriginal Community Infrastructure Program and the First Mortgage and Community Infrastructure Program to enable Aboriginal organisations to meet their infrastructure needs and serve their communities

In 2022–23 the Aboriginal Community Infrastructure Program delivered its sixth successful funding round. Round 6 awarded more than $11 million to 21 Aboriginal organisations to upgrade or build community infrastructure including:

  • $1.6 million for Goolum Aboriginal Cooperative to upgrade the Dalki Ghuli Community Hub into a fit-for-purpose facility in Horsham
  • $1.6 million for Wathaurong Aboriginal Cooperative to create a fit-for-purpose, culturally safe Healing Spirit Youth Hub for children and young people to access clinical and therapeutic services and support
  • $1.6 million for Worawa Aboriginal College to expand the existing meeting space in its professional learning and resource centre to increase accessibility and functionality
  • $1.6 million for Yorta Nation Aboriginal Corporation, which is building stage two of its cultural research and exhibition complex in Barmah
  • $1.4 million for Bunjilwarra (in partnership with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service) to refurbish its existing administration building to support staff and case care recovery workers.

In 2022–23 DPC removed first mortgages from five properties owned by three Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations as part of the First Mortgage and Community Infrastructure Program. First mortgages were removed from:

  • Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-operative property in Mooroopna
  • Gippsland and East Gippsland Aboriginal Cooperative’s property in Bairnsdale
  • Ngwala Aboriginal Corporation’s properties in Windsor, East St Kilda and Thornbury.

The removal of first mortgages gives these organisations full control of their assets, increased financial autonomy and the ability to boost their economic growth and stability. With more choice in how their assets are used, these organisations can further contribute to the social, cultural and economic development of their communities.

Delivering the Munarra Centre for Regional Excellence, a $36 million major capital works project

In 2022–23 DPC continued its focus on delivering the first major project for First Peoples – State Relations. The Munarra Centre for Regional Excellence (MCRE) will drive economic growth in the Goulbourn Murray region for both First Peoples and non–First Nations people. It will provide a
fit-for-purpose, safe space from which Aboriginal community-controlled and led organisations and their partners can deliver culturally responsive education, employment, health and wellbeing initiatives. At the same time, the MCRE will showcase and celebrate First Peoples’ knowledge, culture and entrepreneurship as a regional, state and national asset.

In 2022–23 DPC completed the design of the MCRE and appointed a 70 per cent First Nations–owned contractor. Construction of the MCRE is underway, with the project forecast to be delivered at the start of 2024.

The project has been delivered in line with best practice First Peoples engagement,
and in alignment with principles of
self-determination.

DPC also continued to provide advice to other agencies in relation to infrastructure projects, including best practice design and construction engagement and procurement processes with First Nations communities.

Supported and resourced Traditional Owner groups by delivering nation-building initiatives, particularly that build and strengthen non–formally recognised Traditional Owner groups

DPC continued to support the Traditional Owner Nation-building Package in partnership with First Nations Legal and Research Services and the Federation of Victorian Traditional Owner Corporations. The package supports both formally and non–formally recognised Traditional Owner groups across Victoria to build strong foundations to ensure they can prepare for and participate in treaty negotiations and deliver on statutory and cultural responsibilities.

In 2022–23 the package strengthened its focus on supporting Traditional Owner groups in the regions without formal recognition.

Support provided under the package in
2022–23 included:

  • supporting 499 Traditional Owners across the Mid North West, Central North, North East and Far East Gippsland regions of Victoria to hold eight gatherings, six projects and four training workshops
  • supporting First Nations Legal and Research Services to continue to provide essential independent legal and research services to support Traditional Owners progress formal recognition in Victoria including engagement with approximately 51 Traditional Owner families and small groups and more than 300 individuals across the four regions without formal recognition
  • supporting the Federation of Victorian Traditional Owner Corporations for core funding, the Nation-building Resource Pool and administration of the Resource Pool, which provides flexible funding to formally recognised Traditional Owner groups for nation-building, treaty readiness and cultural heritage–related projects to be delivered by December 2024
  • extending Traditional Owner engagement officers in each Registered Aboriginal Party until December 2023, to support nation-building and treaty readiness.

Supported the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council to progress and fulfil its statutory functions

DPC has continued to provide secretariat and operational support to the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council to meet its responsibilities under the Aboriginal Heritage Act, including the appointment and oversight of RAPs.

In 2022–23 DPC convened six meetings (one regional) of the council, in line with the Aboriginal Heritage Act, over two days. During this time, DPC has supported the council through secretariat and operational support to achieve the following:

  • presented the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples with the State of Victoria’s Aboriginal Cultural Heritage 2016–2021, prepared by Dr Terri Janke and informed by lengthy engagement with RAPs and Victorian Traditional Owners
  • endorsed three new projects, aligned with Dhawura Ngilan: A Vision for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage in Australia and the Best Practice Standards in Indigenous Cultural Heritage Management and Legislation
  • undertook a comprehensive review of ancestors in the council’s care (more than 2,000 cases) to prepare for the return of many ancestors to their Country
    in 2023–24
  • introduced the Ancestral Remains Repatriation Fund, endorsed by the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples, to ensure Traditional Owners are adequately resourced to take part in repatriation processes
  • convened seven Ancestral Remains Advisory Committee meetings to make statutory decisions on the management and return of ancestors (meetings also decided on cultural heritage management plans and requests to access the register)
  • signed a memorandum of understanding with the University of Melbourne to jointly progress the repatriation of ancestors and cultural material that once comprised part of the Donald Thomson Collection
  • provided advice to the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples pursuant to the Aboriginal Heritage Actconcerning the making of an Ongoing Protection Declaration, the appointment of authorised officers, and the introduction of heritage adviser guidelines
  • received and reviewed Registered Aboriginal Party applications and oversaw several complaints against Registered Aboriginal Parties, some of which have progressed through mediation to resolution
  • promoted cultural heritage in several forums and contexts including the Registered Aboriginal Party Forums, the Heritage Chairs and Officials for Australia and New Zealand, industry events including with Master Builders Association, interagency events including with the Environmental Protection Authority. The council also performed an educative role with Certificate IV students and DPC staff seeking to become authorised officers under the Aboriginal Heritage Act.

Progressed and fulfilled the Victorian Government’s statutory responsibilities under the Aboriginal Lands Act 1970 and supported self-governance and self-determination activities at Framlingham and Lake Tyers Aboriginal Trusts

The 2022–23 State Budget provided $2 million over four years in output funding to strengthen the independence of the trusts. This initiative provided funding for:

  • both communities to deliver self-determined services and initiatives to support: social and emotional wellbeing; emerging young leaders to gain the necessary skills to manage trust affairs in the future; and greater access to professional training opportunities for management
  • the Victorian Government to appropriately respond to the independent review of the Act
  • added support for Framlingham Aboriginal Trust to successfully exit administration.

Negotiated and implemented agreements between the State and Traditional Owner groups under the Traditional Owner Settlement Act 2010

The Land Justice Unit joined DPC on 1 January 2023 following machinery of government changes after the November 2022 State Election.

During 2022–23 DPC has:

  • advised the government on increasing compensation entitlements for Traditional Owners as part of a Land Use Activity Agreement under the Traditional Owner Settlement Act, in response to changes in Australian law
  • continued negotiations under the Act with the Gunaikurnai people, Wotjobaluk, Jaadwa, Jadawadjali, Wergaia and Jupagulk peoples and Dja Dja Wurrung peoples to supplement the interim agreements reached with those groups in 2022
  • continued to implement agreements under the Act with Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation, Gunaikurnai Land and Waters Aboriginal Corporation, Taungurung Land and Waters Council and Barengi Gadjin Land Council Aboriginal Corporation
  • continued to support Dja Dja Wurrung’s building of its Corporate and Community Centre at Hattam Street, Bendigo, including attending the garni (digging stick) ceremony on 16 June to celebrate the start of construction
  • completed the return of title to Taungurung of the Nyagaroon property (formerly Acheron Youth Justice Camp)
  • maintained engagement with several groups about their entry into or resumption of Act negotiations
  • inputted into other reform projects that might affect the rights of Victorian Traditional Owners to ensure their voice is heard and that they can take opportunities to advance.

Supported Traditional Owners to achieve the native title determination outcomes they seek

In 2022–23 DPC achieved the following key outcomes:

  • On 28 March 2023 the Eastern Maar People’s native title claim was largely resolved in a ceremonial hearing of the Federal Court at Logan’s Beach in Warrnambool to recognise Eastern Maar’s native title rights. Work continues on resolving some parts of the claim.
  • DPC continued to work with First Peoples and to support the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples to respond to native title claims made in the Federal Court.

DPC has also worked with First Peoples’ legal representatives and supported the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples to respond to native title matters currently before the Federal Court, including by:

  • taking part in hearings in the Boonwurrung proceeding
  • taking part in hearings into claims by Gunditjmara and Eastern Maar
  • taking part in mediation of the First Peoples of the Millewa-Mallee proceeding
  • considering registration and notification issues in the Wamba Wemba and the Wadawurrung claims.

Work in partnership with the Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation to negotiate changes in response to the 2018 Initial Outcomes Review of the Traditional Owner Settlement Act 2010 agreement signed in 2013

DPC has partnered with the Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation to respond to the Initial Outcomes Review conducted by Professor Mick Dodson, concluding in October 2018, including by implementing a Revised Settlement Package, signed on 25 October 2022. The package:

  • increased funding commitments (for example, providing a one-off implementation payment, additional corporation funding, ongoing management of natural resource funding and ongoing joint management funding)
  • expanded the Local Government Engagement Strategy
  • strengthened and consolidated the Natural Resource Agreement (for example, clarifying take and use rights and strengthening strategies to support participation and employment of the Dja Dja Wurrung people in the management of Natural Resources)
  • introduced the Traditional Owner Land Natural Resource Agreement (extending certain take and use rights outlined in the Natural Resource Agreement to all Traditional Owner land within the Agreement Area in which the corporation, a subsidiary of the corporation or a member of the Dja Dja Wurrung Traditional Owner group has an estate in fee simple)
  • committed to continuing to negotiate with the corporation in 2023 on changes to the Land Use Activity Agreement to complete the revised Settlement Package.

Progress towards achieving the objective

The output performance measures that provide information on DPC’s progress in achieving the ‘First Peoples in Victoria are strong and self-determining’ strategic objective are outlined below.

Objective indicator: First Peoples in Victoria have increased control over decisions that impact their lives.

Performance measureUnit2019–202020–212021–222022–23
Capacity-building activities provided for Traditional Owners to support the management and protection of Aboriginal cultural and intangible heritagenumber16101616

More details on DPC’s 2022–23 performance against its output performance measures are provided on pages 49–59.

Professional public administration — key initiatives

This objective fosters and promotes a high-performing public service. It ensures effective whole of government performance and outcomes. It protects the integrity and values of good governance to foster and maintain public trust in government.

Outcomes on the following key initiatives have helped DPC achieve the ‘Professional public administration’ objective.

Provided clear, timely and practical guidance, expertise and support to stakeholders in relation to Cabinet, Parliament, legislation, Executive Council and ministerial correspondence matters

In 2022–23 DPC provided expert guidance to support Cabinet, Parliament, Executive Council and ministerial correspondence matters. This included administrative support for Cabinet, the Premier and DPC ministers, as well as across departments and the ministry where needed. DPC also provided high-quality administrative support for the Governor in relation to Executive Council matters.

Provided central media relations, communications, advertising and research governance advisory services to Victorian government departments and ministers

DPC delivered a range of products and services including speeches, website content, media releases, internal communications, events, video production and photography throughout 2022–23.

As part of its strategic governance and central advisory role for all government advertising campaigns, DPC ensured adherence to the Victorian Government Communication Guidelines and relevant legislation, supported the consistent development of campaign creative and media buying across government and provided strategic advice on communicating with diverse and regional audiences.

Support was provided across the department and to DPC ministers on a number of priorities. Examples of support
provided include:

  • the introduction of the Treaty Authority Bill into the Victorian Parliament
  • agreement between the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria and the Victorian Government on a Treaty Negotiation Framework
  • trialling a digital drivers’ licence through the Service Victoria app.

DPC provided strategic advice and oversight of the protocol policies and functions of the Victorian Government and operational delivery of state-significant protocol events. Key events included:

  • delivering Australia Day public events and programs and Victoria’s participation in the National Australia Day
    Council program
  • significant state memorial services for
    • the Hon Jane Garrett
    • John Famechon AM
    • Judith Durham AO
    • John Famechon AM
    • Uncle Jack Charles
    • Uncle Archie Roach AM
    • The Hon John Landy AC CVO MBE
    • Dame Olivia Newton-John AC DBE
    • Emeritus Professor Derek Denton AC FRS FAA FRCP FRACP LLD (Hon)
    • Father Bob Maguire AM RFD
  • a farewell dinner for the Hon Linda Dessau AC CVO at the conclusion of her term as Governor of Victoria.

Provided behavioural science capability to all Victorian government departments to support the delivery of behaviourally informed programs and services

Throughout 2022–23 DPC used international evidence to support effective implementation of policies, programs and communications across a number of portfolio areas through the use of behavioural science. This included improving citizen interactions with services, enhancing the accessibility of forms and website communications, and improving internal government processes such as staff reporting and data collection, and frontline recruitment activity.

Enhanced public sector integrity and governance capability, including through working with the Victorian Public Sector Commission, to ensure the public sector operates in keeping with the highest expectations of trust

DPC promotes good governance and public administration, high-quality decision and policymaking, government integrity and accountability, and trust in public institutions. Key priorities and deliverables in 2022–23 for DPC included:

  • advising stakeholders on the application of the Appointment and Remuneration Guidelines and the Diversity on Boards Guidelines, as well as monitoring and reporting on compliance
  • supporting the process to create new non-departmental entities through providing policy advice, fact sheets and guidance to stakeholders
  • providing advice to support effective public administration and good governance — for example, by supporting the application of the Public Administration Act
  • providing advice to the Minister for Government Services on the VPSC’s performance against its annual plan. DPC works closely with the VPSC to support a trusted public sector that delivers exceptional outcomes for the Victorian community.

Provided guidance and advice on public sector executive workforce policies to ensure consistent and transparent executive employment and remuneration practices across the public sector

DPC provides guidance and advice across the Victorian Public Sector on executive workforce policies including the Public Entity Executive Remuneration Policy and the Public Administration Act.

These policies are publicly available, including on DPC’s website, to promote transparency in executive employment and remuneration. DPC’s role includes supporting public sector employers to apply the government’s executive employment and remuneration policies consistently.

DPC has continued to provide legal and legal policy advice on matters that relate to DPC’s ministerial portfolios, including constitutional law, administrative law, corporate law matters, parliamentary committees, conventions and practices, subordinate legislation, electoral matters for state parliamentary elections, and policy matters pertaining to the department more broadly, including on issues arising out of the department’s project and policy areas.

DPC has also advised on the government’s legislative program by helping develop legislative and regulatory proposals. It continued to manage DPC’s freedom of information requests and provide privacy advice for the department. Notably, during 2022–23 DPC assisted the Secretary in ensuring public sector awareness and adherence to caretaker conventions applicable in the caretaker period before the 2022 State Election.

Supported the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal to uphold integrity and trust in remuneration arrangements for Members of Parliament, senior public officials and elected local government officials

DPC provides secretariat support to the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal. During 2022–23 DPC supported the tribunal to:

  • make a new comprehensive Determination setting the salaries and allowances for MPs
  • make revised guidelines setting the eligibility criteria and rules for certain work-related parliamentary allowances and the Electorate Office and Communications Budget available to MPs
  • make annual adjustment Determinations for allowances payable to elected local government officials (Mayors, Deputy Mayors and Councillors)
  • make annual adjustment Determinations of remuneration bands for executives employed in the Victorian public service and in prescribed public entities
  • provide advice to public sector employers on proposals to pay an executive above the relevant remuneration band set by the tribunal
  • provide advice to the Minister for Government Services about remuneration arrangements for relevant public sector executive roles.

DPC also supports the compliance officer attached to the tribunal to independently hear and determine appeals from MPs in relation to claims for work-related parliamentary allowances and the separation payment. The compliance officer did not hear any appeals
in 2022–23.

Drafted legislation to implement policy initiatives

In 2022–23 the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel (OCPC) drafted a variety of legislation to implement major government policy initiatives and reforms across a wide range of law.

OCPC drafted 33 government bills in the reporting period, which was impacted by the caretaker period in November 2022. These included the Human Source Management Act 2023, the Victorian Future Fund Act 2023 and the Monitoring of Places of Detention by the United Nations Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture (OPCAT) Act 2022.

Over the 2022–23 period 150 statutory rules were made.

Throughout 2022–23 OCPC provided drafting services to Parliament to facilitate the passage of Victorian Government legislation, the preparation of House amendments and the drafting and introduction of Private Members’ Bills. The demand for drafting services for House Amendments and Private Members’ Bills from opposition and independent MPs continued to grow during 2022–23.

Developed and implemented a new work management system to deliver efficiencies and enhanced services to stakeholders and the public

OCPC engaged a provider to develop and implement a new replacement work management and legislative database system. The new system will deliver efficiencies and enhanced services to government, parliament, industry and the public and will completely replace the office’s current systems for managing legal projects. The project began in February 2023 and the new system is expected to be fully operational in 2024–25.

Supported the Governor to carry out the role for the benefit of Victoria

In addition to constitutional and ceremonial duties, the Governor, the Hon Linda Dessau AC CVO, took part in a wide range of community and international engagement events in 2022–23.

Of particular significance, 8 September 2022 marked the passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Over two weeks the Governor and her spouse, Mr Anthony Howard AM KC, welcomed members of the public into Government House to sign condolence books and view a memorial exhibition. A ceremony for the Proclamation of the Sovereign was also held at Government House.

Other events hosted included the Australia Day Flag Raising Ceremony, a celebration of Victorians celebrating their platinum wedding anniversary, the 175th Anniversary of the Royal Melbourne Hospital and an Open House and Reception to mark the Coronation of Their Majesties King Charles III and Queen Camilla.

In 2022–23 the Governor continued international engagement on behalf of the state at the request of the government, both locally and overseas. This included visiting the United States, Italy, Japan, Singapore, Israel, the United Kingdom and Turkey, where the Governor attended the ANZAC Day Gallipoli Dawn Service.

Progress towards achieving the objective

The output performance measures that provide information on DPC’s progress in achieving the ‘Professional public administration’ strategic objective are outlined below.

Objective indicator: Support for Cabinet, committee members and Executive Council is valued and informs decision making.

Performance measureUnit2019–202020–212021–222022–23
Number of briefs supporting Cabinet and Cabinet committee decision making number1,1361,8061,430913

Objective indicator: Agency compliance with government advertising and communication guidelines.

Performance measureUnit2019–202020–212021–222022–23
Relevant communication activity compliant with government advertising and communication guidelines number100100100100

Objective indicator: Provision of high-quality legislative drafting and publication services.

Performance measureUnit2019–202020–212021–222022–23
Bills and statutory rules drafted or settled that meet the required standard per cent999910099

Objective indicator: Advice contributes to the achievement of government policies and priorities relating to Victoria’s electoral system, executive and parliamentary remuneration and public sector governance.

Performance measureUnit2019–202020–212021–222022–23
Election events conducted by the Victorian Electoral Commission, including state elections and by-elections, local government elections and countbacks, and statutory elections or pollsnumbernm102126
VPSC: Percentage of new to VPS executives participating in the induction programper centnm929689

More details on DPC’s 2022–23 performance against its output performance measures are provided on pages 49–59.

Performance against output performance measures

The section provides information about DPC’s performance against output performance measures. It provides a comparison with output targets that were published in the Departmental Performance Statement section of the 2022–23 Victorian Budget Paper No. 3 — Service Delivery.

Commentary is provided where there are variances of more than 5 per cent between targets and actual results for performance measures.

Economic policy advice and support

This output contributes to delivering strategic, timely and comprehensive analysis and advice on economic policy to support government decision making.

This output also contributes to strengthening Victoria’s economic performance through the activities of the Victorian Jobs and Investment Fund.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
New investment resulting from government facilitation services and assistance under the Victorian Jobs and Investment Fund$ million 15017114%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target with a small number of projects having relatively high capital expenditure.
Jobs resulting from government facilitation services and assistance under the Victorian Jobs and Investment Fundnumber2,0001,308–35%***
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target because the number of projects have been varied, rescoped or delayed in 2022–23, and in the case of several projects, cancelled. Factors underpinning this include market-wide challenges with identifying appropriate sites, labour/skills shortages and other economic drivers (including higher interest rates).
Quality
Key stakeholder satisfaction with advice and support relating to economic policy and land coordinationper cent8510018%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target because all stakeholders who responded to the survey were satisfied or very satisfied with the advice and support relating to economic policy.
Timeliness
Provision of economic policy briefings within agreed timeframesper cent8581–5%**
Cost
Total output cost$ million34.433.3–3%**

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

** Performance target not achieved — within 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

*** Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Social policy advice and intergovernmental relations

This output contributes to delivering strategic, timely and comprehensive analysis and advice on social policy to support government decision making.

This output also contributes to the strategic coordination of emergency management strategies and planning across the Victorian public sector.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
Whole of government emergency management forums, meetings and exercises facilitatednumber2048140%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to meetings held in response to October 2022 floods.
Quality
Key stakeholder satisfaction with advice and support relating to social policyper cent8510018%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target because all stakeholders who responded to the survey were satisfied or very satisfied with the advice and support relating to social policy.
Timeliness
Provision of social policy briefings within agreed timeframes.per cent8583–2%**
Cost
Total output cost$ million19.727.238%***
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to additional social policy responsibilities that were funded by the reinstatement of a Treasurer's Advance from 2021–22 to 2022–23.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

** Performance target not achieved — within 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

*** Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Industrial relations

This output contributes to providing fair jobs and a positive industrial relations environment through sound industrial relations policy and advice to government. This includes oversight of enterprise bargaining across the Victorian public sector and support for Victoria’s participation in the national workplace relations system.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
Employers informed on OHS obligations under both state and Commonwealth legislation and regulationsnumber> 3,50011,012215%*
The 2022­–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to the increasing use of digital platforms resulting in greater reach.
Workers informed on OHS obligations under both state and Commonwealth legislation and regulationsnumber> 40,00053,52734%*
The 2022­–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to the increasing use of digital platforms resulting in greater reach.
Child employment investigations completednumber20022412%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to efficiencies that have been realised through improved internal processes. The 2023–24 target has been increased in recognition of these improved processes.
Quality
Public sector agreements renewed and approved within the current enterprise bargaining frameworkper cent1001000%*
Victoria represented in major industrial relations cases and inquiriesper cent1001000%*
Timeliness
Review and assessment of submitted public sector enterprise bargaining costings and proposed agreements completed and submitted for approval within four weeksper cent9010011%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target because all 20 agreements met the timeframes.
Long service leave investigations completed within 90 days of lodgementper cent2574196%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to efficiencies that have been realised through improved internal processes. The 2023–24 target has been increased in recognition of these improved processes.
Cost
Total output cost$ million35.724.9–30%*
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target due to delays in implementing industrial relations initiatives, therefore DPC has requested the unapplied appropriations are carried over from 2022–23 to 2023–24.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Self-determination policy reform advice and programs

This output supports the Victorian Government’s commitment to self-determination for First Peoples and to improving long-term social and economic outcomes. This includes progress towards treaty; engaging with the Yoorrook Justice Commission; and work to reform government to enable self-determination, as well as undertaking outcomes-focused reporting across the portfolio.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
Number of Assembly and/or
State Assembly meetings held
number406255%*
The 2022–23 actual was higher than the 2022–23 target due to negotiations required to finalise the treaty elements in the previous term of government, and to support operationalisation of the treaty elements in preparation for formal treaty negotiations in the current term.
Quality
Government stakeholder satisfaction with coordination of Victorian Government’s response to the Yoorrook Justice Commissionper cent80879%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target, indicating that the WoVG Working Group and Interdepartmental Committee were satisfied with DPC’s coordination of the Yoorrook Justice Commission response.
Completion of an Aboriginal-led evaluation and review of government performance under the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework 2018–2023 and the National Agreement on Closing the Gap

number

110%*
Timeliness
Delivery of a public report on outcomes for Aboriginal Victorians to be tabled in Parliament by 30 June each financial yearnumber110%*
Cost
Total output cost$ million75.161.7–18%*
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target due to delays in implementing Treaty and First Peoples initiatives, therefore DPC has requested the unapplied appropriations are carried over from 2022–23 to 2023–24.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

Traditional owner engagement and cultural heritage management programs

This output supports the government’s commitment to protecting Aboriginal cultural rights, including supporting Traditional Owners and First Peoples organisations to
deliver self-determined initiatives for their communities. This includes the protection and management of Aboriginal cultural heritage and strengthening Aboriginal community organisations.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
Capacity-building activities provided
for Traditional Owners to support the management and protection of Aboriginal cultural and intangible heritage
number16160%*
Average weekly hours of case management provided to members
of the Stolen Generations
number8076–5%**
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target due to the competitive nature of employment post COVID. Connecting Home, which provides the service for the Stolen Generations, anticipates that average case management hours should increase again in 2023–24, but this will depend on future funding outcomes.
Number of family history investigations conducted by the Victorian Koorie Family History Service on behalf of members of the Stolen Generationsnumber240456150%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to an increase in requests for the service due to the Stolen Generations Reparations Package. Additionally, the family history investigations have long lead times, which affect the total number being measured.
Removal of first mortgages on titles of property owned by Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisationsnumber4525%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to a higher than expected response rate from eligible Aboriginal organisations that have applied to have first mortgages removed from their properties.
Number of Recognition and Settlement Agreements that commence (Land Justice Unit)number330%*
Quality
The service provision of the Office of the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council enables the Victorian Aboriginal
Heritage Council to undertake its statutory responsibilities
per cent809013%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target, which indicates the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council members believe DPC provides a high-quality service to the council, enabling the council to undertake its statutory responsibilities.
Funding recipients report that the achievement of program objectives is supported by DPC’s role in the funding relationshipper cent809316%
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to funding being received for an additional VPS position, which enabled dedicated, tailored engagement with funding recipients to build and maintain strong relationships.
Timeliness
Average days to process applications, to register an Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Place (Cultural Heritage Management Plan related) on the Victorian Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Register, meets or reduces days takendays6070–17%
The 2022–23 actual did not meet the 2022–23 target because a competitive staffing market restrained resourcing capacity. It is expected that the days taken to register a Place should decrease in 2023–24 as staffing levels increase.
Proportion of native title negotiations progressed in accordance with the department’s annual work plan and timeframes monitored by the Federal Court (Land Justice Unit)per cent1001000%
Cost
Total output cost$ million36.629.1–20%
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target primarily due to the rephase of unapplied appropriations from
2022–23 to 2023–24.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

** Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Executive government advice and support

This output contributes to:

  • providing strategic, timely and comprehensive support to Cabinet and Cabinet subcommittees
  • providing support to the Governor and maintaining Government House and its collections as a heritage asset of national importance
  • delivering analysis and advice to support evidence-based decision making across the public sector
  • providing whole of government community engagement and communications activity.
Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
Whole of government forums, meetings and advisory groups chairednumber85928%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to a greater number of meetings chaired by the Deputy Secretary of the Economic Policy and State Productivity group in the second half of 2022–23.
Number of briefs supporting Cabinet and Cabinet committee decision makingnumber1,200913–24%**
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target due to a reduced volume of meetings that required briefings due to the caretaker period and new term establishment period.
Office of the Governor: Increase in the annual number of guests and visitors to Government Houseper cent5851,600%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to increased guest numbers following COVID-19 restrictions impacting previous years’ results.
Number of projects and advisory support provided to departments facilitated by the Behavioural Insights Unitnumber60600%*
Quality
Office of the Governor: Government House accessibility and useability meets standards in asset management strategyper cent79801%*
Office of the Governor: Government House gardens and grounds meet standards in asset management strategyper cent85850%*
Satisfaction with services provided by the Behavioural Insights Unit to government agenciesper cent7010043%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target because all clients who responded to the survey were satisfied with the level of service provided.
Relevant communication activity compliant with government advertising and communication guidelinesper cent 1001000%*
Timeliness
Office of the Governor: Support the Governor’s community engagement activities by arranging all internal and external events in a timely mannerper cent1001000%*
Timely delivery of State events and functionsper cent1001000%*
Cost
Total output cost$ million126.8168.433%**
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target, predominantly due to supplementation funding provided to DPC to cover its operational requirements and donations to support humanitarian causes and events.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

** Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Public sector administration advice and support

This output provides advice and support on issues relevant to public sector administration, Members of Parliament and executive officer remuneration, governance, service delivery and workforce matters, as well as to public sector professionalism and integrity. It includes related research, determinations, data collection, reporting and dissemination of information.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
VPSC: Percentage of new-to-VPS executives participating in the induction programper cent788914%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to an increased uptake of participants in the program with fewer program withdrawals/deferrals.
VPSC: Percentage of VPS jobs advertised through the Jobs and Skills Exchangeper cent90956%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target because the limited number of jobs advertised externally only are mainly for community services or other bulk recruitment campaigns.
VPSC: Number of engagement and promotion activities undertaken by the Jobs and Skills Exchangenumber203155%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to increased usage of the Jobs and Skills Exchange platform for surge and other recruitment campaigns.
Quality
Key stakeholder satisfaction with advice and support relating to public administration and whole of government governanceper cent9010011%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to positive stakeholder feedback about advice given to support effective administration of government, promotion of good governance, integrity, accountability and trust.
Stakeholder satisfaction with the Remuneration Tribunal’s process regarding determinations, reviews and adviceper cent80879%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to stronger than expected positive stakeholder feedback about the tribunal’s processes for making determinations of remuneration for Members of Parliament, public sector executives and elected local government officials and providing advice on public sector executive remuneration.
VPSC: Percentage of agencies that interacted with VPSC and that indicated VPSC advice and support assisted them to improve integrity capabilityper cent90900%*
VPSC: Overall satisfaction with engagement, consultation and responsiveness from the GRADS teamper cent859411%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target, which may be due to the proportion of graduates who completed the survey that assesses this metric. The most recent survey (May 2023) included 69 responses from 141 graduates, representing 49 per cent of the overall population.
VPSC: Satisfaction with responses to user queries on the Jobs and Skills Exchange platform per cent809519%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to further staff training on effective responses, review and improvement of internal processes, leading to faster ticket resolution times. In addition, technology remediation has focused on end-user bug fixes and user design principles for easier platform navigation, resulting in a better user experience.
Timeliness
Tribunal’s legislated work program delivered within established timeframeper cent859613%*
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to improvements to the tribunal’s internal processes.
VPSC: Percentage of process completion of Victorian public sector annual workforce data by the end of February each yearper cent95950%*
Cost
Total output cost$ million23.534.346%**
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to funding approved since publication of the 2022–23 State Budget to support the implementation of integrity reforms and due to the reinstatement of a Treasurer’s Advance from 2021–22 to 2022–23 for the Workforce Transition Fund initiative.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

** Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Chief Parliamentary Counsel services

This output provides bills for introduction in Parliament, including providing quality and timely legislative drafting services; hard copy and electronic publication of Acts and statutory rules; and maintaining a database of Victorian legislation and legislative information at www.legislation.vic.gov.au.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
Formal advice provided on legislationnumber5005102%*
Acts and statutory rules published electronically and in hard copy without errorper cent961004%*
Statutory rules made and bills prepared and introduced into Parliamentnumber2202305%*
Number of sets of House Amendments drafted for Members of Parliamentnumber7548–36%**
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target due to the cessation of activity during the caretaker period.
Quality
Bills and statutory rules drafted or settled that meet the required standardper cent97992%*
Timeliness
Bills and statutory rules drafted or settled within the required timeframeper cent97981%*
Electronically published versions of principal Acts and statutory rules published within three business days of coming into operation and new Acts and statutory rules published within 24 hours of makingper cent961004%*
Cost
Total output cost$ million9.77.5–22%*
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target due to the reclassification of output expenditure to capital expenditure, due to the nature of the expenditure, which developed an asset.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

* Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

State electoral roll and electoral events

This output provides a high-quality electoral system that supports democracy in Victoria through administering an accurate and secure electoral roll, electoral services to ensure fair and equitable representation, the conduct of fair and impartial elections and encouraging greater participation in civic life through education and awareness activities and improving ease of access.

Performance measureUnit2022–23 target2022–23 actualVarianceResult
Quantity
Election events conducted by the Victorian Electoral Commission, including state elections and by-elections, local government elections, by-elections and countbacks, and statutory elections or pollsnumber2826–7%**
The 2022–23 actual is lower than the 2022–23 target because the movement of councillors in local government has reduced when compared with previous years. The removal of liquor licence poll elections has affected the number of electoral events.
Quality
Election events invalidated by a court
of disputed returns as a result of a proven claim against the Victorian Electoral Commission’s conduct of that event
number000%*
Timeliness
Meets timeframes for application of elector-initiated enrolment, direct enrolment and close of roll enrolment activity in the maintenance and accuracy of the register of electorsper cent951005%*
Cost
Total output cost$ million117.4147.125%**
The 2022–23 actual is higher than the 2022–23 target due to the Victorian Electoral Commission having additional special appropriation funding allocated in 2022–23 due to the State Election.

Results legend

* Performance target achieved or exceeded in a desirable way

** Performance target not achieved — exceeds 5 per cent or $50 million (cost measures only) variance

Section 3: Financial statements

Accountable Officer’s and Chief Financial Officer’s declaration

The attached financial statements for the Department of Premier and Cabinet have been prepared in accordance with Direction 5.2 of the Standing Directions of the Assistant Treasurer under the Financial Management Act 1994, applicable Financial Reporting Directions, Australian Accounting Standards including Interpretations, and other mandatory professional reporting requirements.

We further state that, in our opinion, the information set out in the comprehensive operating statement, balance sheet, cash flow statement, statement of changes in equity and accompanying notes, presents fairly the financial transactions during the year ended 30 June 2023 and financial position of the department at 30 June 2023.

At the time of signing, we are not aware of any circumstance that would render any particulars included in the financial statements to be misleading or inaccurate.

We authorise the attached financial statements for issue on 13 September 2023.

Anthony Bale
Chief Financial Officer
Department of Premier and Cabinet
Melbourne
13 September 2023

Jeremi Moule
Secretary
Department of Premier and Cabinet
Melbourne
13 September 2023

Comprehensive operating statement for the financial year ended 30 June 2023

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Continuing operations
Income from transactions
Output appropriations2.1562,989599,827
Special appropriations2.1141,14750,674
Grants2.118,94930,937
Other income2.19,51713,430
Total income from transactions 732,602694,868
Expenses from transactions
Grant expenses3.1353,419225,951
Employee expenses3.1234,876257,395
Depreciation and amortisation5.314,05524,066
Interest expense 112174
Other operating expenses3.1128,076167,540
Total expenses from transactions 730,538675,126
Net result from transactions (net operating balance) 2,06419,742
Other economic flows included in net result
Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets8.131622
Other gains on other economic flows8.1482,222
Total other economic flows included in net result 3642,244
Net result 2,42821,986
Other economic flows — other comprehensive income
Changes in physical asset revaluation surplus 5.1.1206,975
Comprehensive result 2,428228,961

Balance sheet as at 30 June 2023

Assets

Financial assets

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Cash and deposits7.2.129,87455,356
Receivables6.156,686118,104
Total financial assets 86,560173,460

Non-financial assets

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Property, plant and equipment5.1262,169895,220
Intangible assets5.22,22944,241
Other non-financial assets6.34785,737
Total non-financial assets 264,876945,198
Total assets 351,4361,118,658

Liabilities

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Payables6.211,32437,036
Borrowings7.13,6627,382
Employee benefits6.435,23356,993
Other provisions6.52,4695,447
Total liabilities 52,688106,858
Net assets 298,7481,011,800

Equity

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Accumulated surplus 86,074171,001
Physical asset revaluation surplus 211,755599,330
Contributed capital 919241,469
Total equity 298,7481,011,800
Net worth 298,7481,011,800

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

Cash flow statement for the financial year ended 30 June 2023

Cash flows from/(used in) operating activities

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Receipts from government 720,456669,578
Receipts from other entities 1,8271,997
Goods and services tax recovered from the Australian Taxation Office 23,31527,075
Interest received

214
Total receipts

745,619698,654
Payments to suppliers and employees

(385,355)(450,856)
Payments of grants expenses

(343,090)(217,918)
Interest and other costs of finance paid

(112)(174)
Total payments (728,557)(668,948)
Net cash flows from operating activities7.2.217,06229,706

Cash flows used in investing activities

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Purchase of non-financial assets (14,152)(22,896)
Proceeds from disposal of motor vehicles 1,144891
Total payments (13,008)(22,005)
Net cash flows used in investing activities (13,008)(22,005)

Cash flows from/(used in) financing activities

Notes

2023

$’000

2022

$’000

Appropriation for capital expenditure purposes 225,91951,800
Special appropriations for capital expenditure purposes2.2.26,7075,710
Cash transferred In – machinery of government changes8.62
Total receipts 232,62857,510
Cash transferred out – machinery of government changes8.6(27,572)(2,672)
Capital grants to portfolio agencies (231,707)(57,510)
Repayment of leases (2,885)(2,555)
Total payments (262,164)(62,737)
Net cash flows used in financing activities (29,536)(5,227)
Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (25,482)2,474
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of financial year 55,35652,882
Cash and equivalents at the end of financial year7.2.129,87455,356

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

Statement of changes in equity for the financial year ended 30 June 2023

Notes

Physical asset revaluation surplus

$’000

Contributed capital

$’000

Accumulated surplus

$’000

Total

$’000

Balance at 30 June 2021 392,355244,141149,015785,511
Net result for the year 21,98621,986
Annual appropriations – capital2.2.151,80051,800
Special appropriations – capital2.2.25,7105,710
Transfer to accumulated surplus
Transfer to contributed capital
Administrative restructure – net assets transferred (2,672)(2,672)
Capital distributions to portfolio agencies (i) (57,510)(57,510)
Changes in physical asset revaluation surplus5.1.1206,975206,975
Balance at 30 June 2022 599,330241,469171,0011,011,800
Net result for the year 2,4282,428
Annual appropriations – capital2.2.1 225,919 225,919
Special appropriations – capital2.2.2 6,707 6,707
Transfer to accumulated surplus (387,575)387,575
Transfer to contributed capital 474,930(474,930)
Administrative restructure – net assets transferred8.6 (716,399)(716,399)
Capital distributions to portfolio agencies (i) (231,707) (231,707)
Changes in physical asset revaluation surplus5.1.1
Balance at 30 June 2023 211,75591986,074298,748

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

Note:

(i) This comprises of capital funding on-passed to portfolio agencies Breakthrough Victoria Pty Limited: $225 million (2022: $50 million), Victorian Electoral Commission: $6.7 million (2022: $5.7 million) and Cenitex: nil (2022: $1.8 million)

Notes to the financial statements

Section 4: Other disclosures

Other financial information

Financial management compliance

Attestation for compliance with Ministerial Standing Direction 5.1.4

Department of Premier and Cabinet

I, Jeremi Moule, the Secretary of the Department of Premier and Cabinet, certify that the Department of Premier and Cabinet has no Material Compliance Deficiency with respect to the applicable Standing Directions under the Financial Management Act 1994 and Instructions.

Jeremi Moule
Secretary
Department of Premier and Cabinet
Melbourne

13 September 2023

Wage Inspectorate Victoria

I, Robert Hortle, the Commissioner of the Wage Inspectorate Victoria, certify that the Wage Inspectorate Victoria has no Material Compliance Deficiency with respect to the applicable Standing Directions under the Financial Management Act 1994 and Instructions.

Robert Hortle
Commissioner
Wage Inspectorate Victoria
Melbourne

21 July 2023

Financial performance

Significant factors that affected DPC’s performance in 2022–23 are summarised below.

DPC recorded a net profit result from operations of $2.1 million for 2022–23.

The profit result is primarily due to timing of trust funds operation, where funds received during 2022–23 will be expended in future years.

Sources of income ($ million)

A pie chart in two segments showing the source of income in millions of dollars. One segment of the pie chart is the income from government appropriations and makes up 96% ($704.1 million). The other segment is other income and makes up 4 % ($28.5 million).

The above graph shows the sources of income available to DPC during the 2022–23 financial year.

DPC’s main source of income is from government appropriations, which account for 96 per cent of income. The balance is derived from government grants and services.

Compared with 2021–22 the overall increase in DPC’s income is mainly due to an increase associated with 2022 State Election funding. This resulted in higher government appropriations.

Expenses ($ million)

A pie chart in three segments showing expenses in millions of dollars. One segment of the pie chart is employee expenses and makes up 32% ($234.9 million). One segment is grant expenses and makes up 48% ($353.4 million). One segment shows other expenses and makes up 20% ($142.2 million).

The above graph shows the distribution of expenses in delivering DPC’s services.

DPC’s total expenses have increased by $55.4 million compared with 2021–22. This is mainly due to increased expenditure for the 2022 State Election and increased grant payments towards the Self-Determination Fund and Breakthrough Victoria.

Financial position — balance sheet

DPC’s assets and liabilities have decreased due to the transfer of functions from DPC following machinery of government changes effective from 1 January 2023.

Cash flows

DPC had a net cash inflow from operating activities of $17.1 million. Compared with last year, this is a $12.6 million decrease. This decrease is mainly due to an overall decrease in level of operational activity due the transfer of major functions following the machinery of government changes, including the timing of payment of liabilities.

Direct costs attributable to machinery of government changes

There were no direct costs attributable to the machinery of government change that have been incurred by the entities that are consolidated into DPC’s annual report pursuant to section 53(1)(b) of the Financial Management Act 1994.

Subsequent events

Refer to the section on subsequent events at Note 8.10 in DPC’s financial statements.

Capital projects / asset investment

During 2022–23 DPC did not have any completed projects that met the disclosure threshold of $10 million or greater.

Procurement

Social procurement framework

During 2022–23 DPC continued to implement its Social Procurement Strategy, which was developed in line with Victoria’s Social Procurement Framework.

In 2022–23 DPC improved social procurement performance against four objectives:

  • opportunities for Victorian Aboriginal people
  • opportunities for Victorians with disability and disadvantaged Victorians
  • supporting safe and fair workplaces
  • opportunities for Victorian social enterprises.

Purchases from social suppliers in 2022–23

Social procurement opportunityMetricNumber of businesses engagedActual spend $
(excl. GST)
Opportunities for Victorian
Aboriginal people
Total spend with Victorian Aboriginal businesses2,890,416
Number of Victorian Aboriginal businesses engaged36
Opportunities for Victorians with disabilityTotal spend with Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for people with disability and Australian Disability Enterprises9,478
Number of Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for people with disability and Australian disability enterprises engaged3
Opportunities for disadvantaged VictoriansTotal spend with Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for the disadvantaged790,177
Number of Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for the disadvantaged engaged7
Sustainable Victorian social enterprises and Aboriginal business sectorsTotal spend with Victorian social enterprises947,018
Number of Victorian social enterprises engaged13

Summary of contributing activities and initiatives

The activities and initiatives relating to Digital Victoria in this annual report reflect the period from 1 July 2022 to 31 December 2022. Following machinery of government changes, from 1 January 2023 Digital Victoria forms part of the Department of Government Services.

  • The End User Computing State
    Purchase Contract addresses the government’s Social Procurement Framework by providing supplier key performance indicators against each framework objective.
  • The Amazon Web Services State Purchase Contract introduces two social procurement measures that will be reported on: women’s equality and safety and environmentally sustainable business practices.
  • The Victorian Telecommunication Services State Purchase Contract has social procurement key performance indicators included, with reporting available by request.
  • Invitations to supply during the financial year included requirements for a minimum of one social procurement objective to be included in supplier proposals. As a result, DPC awarded contracts to the estimated value of $22.9 million to suppliers that provided a valid response to meeting social procurement objectives in their organisation.
  • DPC’s social procurement achievements in 2022–23 include 36 Victorian Aboriginal businesses engaged and $2.9 million (excluding GST) of actual expenditure, achieving 2.9 per cent Aboriginal procurement, exceeding the 1 per cent procurement target for procuring goods and services from Aboriginal businesses, as set through Tharamba Bugheen: Victorian Aboriginal Business Strategy 2017–2021.
  • Through refined procurement and business processes DPC continued to encourage direct spend with Aboriginal suppliers where Aboriginal knowledge and expertise is needed.
  • DPC procured a range of services from several Victorian Aboriginal businesses in 2022–23, including professional advisory and communication services.
  • DPC has a social procurement spend dashboard that is updated monthly so spend is monitored.
  • DPC continues to build on its relationship with Kinaway Chamber of Commerce Victoria Ltd to identify new initiatives on raising awareness of Aboriginal businesses.
  • All suppliers engaged via a competitive procurement process with DPC have committed to the Victorian Government Supplier Code of Conduct by signing a commitment letter before the engagement.
  • DPC contributed to social outcomes through the Barring Djinang — Coaching and Career Development program, which has enabled 75 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait participants to progress into leadership opportunities, with another 20 people undertaking the program in 2023–24.
  • DPC contributed to social outcomes through the Career Seekers Internship Program by providing the opportunity for approximately 61 disadvantaged asylum seeker and refugee Victorians over the past two years to take part in intern-type employment within the Victorian Government.

Disclosure of emergency procurement

DPC developed and implemented its Emergency Procurement Plan in December 2022 in line with the requirements of the Victorian Government Purchasing Board Governance policy. The Emergency Procurement Plan applies when procuring goods and services in response to an emergency. In 2022–23 DPC did not activate its Emergency Procurement Plan.

Environmental performance

Measuring environmental performance is an evolving process within government and business. This environmental report represents a significant milestone for DPC, as Financial Reporting Direction (FRD) 24 introduces 42 key reporting indicators for the first time this year, a substantial increase from the previous 14 measures.

Due to the changing key reporting indicators, there are instances where data from previous reporting periods is not available for inclusion in certain sections of this report. Absence of data for this reporting period is denoted as ‘NC’ in this report, indicating ‘not collected’. DPC is committed to improving reporting standards and data collection so the full set of new FRD 24 indicators can be reported on in the next 12 to 24 months.

DPC’s commitment to sustainability drives diverse operational activities and ongoing workplace environment management, effectively reducing its environmental footprint. This ensures a continued focus on sustainability. Key initiatives include:

  • integrating environmental considerations into all tender specifications, demonstrating environmentally responsible procurement
  • adopting a tri-stream approach (landfill, commingled and organics) for waste disposal, promoting waste minimisation and recycling
  • prioritising energy efficiency with the use of appliances and sensor lighting that conserve energy
  • sourcing sustainable furniture, with a preference for locally produced items, exemplified by office workstations holding a trusted Global GreenTag certification
  • practising responsible relocation with significant clean-up activities and sustainable waste disposal
  • actively recycling usable furniture and equipment during refurbishments or relocations to reduce waste
  • adopting digital solutions to curtail paper-based activities, fostering a shift towards more eco-friendly and sustainable practices.

Through these concerted efforts, DPC is poised to make a lasting impact on sustainability, paving the way for a greener and more environmentally conscious future.

The department's environmental management system

The AS/NZS ISO 14001:2016: Environmental Management Systems is an international standard that provides a framework that organisations can use to establish and implement effective environmental management systems to improve their environmental performance.

The development of the environmental management system is a crucial step for DPC in identifying and managing its environmental aspects across various operational activities. By aligning with AS/NZS ISO 14001:2016, DPC aims to adhere to best practices and meet regulatory requirements while also aligning with evolving community expectations.

DPC understands that maturing in this space is an ongoing process and will require collaborative efforts and consistent dedication. Through targeted initiatives and the integration of sustainable practices into its operations, DPC aims to develop a mature and impactful environmental management system that aligns with the ISO standard, fostering a greener and more sustainable future.

Reporting boundary for environmental data

DPC’s report on environmental data covers the 2022–23 reporting period. The data has been collected through consumption reports, audits and surveys encompassing all departmental sites and assets where DPC holds operational control.

DPC reporting excludes sites where DPC staff are located within another Victorian Government entity’s facility. In these limited situations, the entity who is the owner or primary lessee is responsible for FRD 24 reporting for all staff in the building.

Where other Victorian Government entity staff are accommodated within a DPC-managed site, reporting of consumption figures has been included in this annual report — for example, co-location or any machinery of government changes within the year. All other DPC public sector entities are excluded from this reporting.

As DPC aligns with the new FRD 24 guidelines, reporting requirements have been expanded to encompass the evolving organisational landscape. While this report does not serve as a baseline, it marks a crucial step in DPC’s journey towards responsible environmental stewardship. With reporting boundaries now being defined and data collection procedures in place, driven by the new requirements, DPC is poised to establish a definitive baseline next year. This will enable us to track environmental performance more comprehensively and further enhance sustainability practices in the years to come.

Climate change has the potential to directly and indirectly affect the services and programs that DPC delivers on behalf of the Victorian Government. This requires ongoing effort to understand and respond to risks, develop opportunities, and build resilience to climate impacts.

DPC aims to lead the Victorian public sector in ways that support Victoria’s transition to net zero emissions and a climate-resilient state. Through this statement, DPC aims to:

  • communicate its actions to understand the impact of climate change on DPC assets, operations and services
  • demonstrate that DPC’s environmental impacts are responsibly managed and mitigated
  • support the efficient allocation of resources to transition operations to net zero emissions and improve environmental performance over time.

DPC adheres to the Victorian Government Risk Management Framework, which follows the standard AS ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management — Guidelines. This internationally recognised framework serves as the basis for DPC’s best practice risk management activities.

DPC is continuing to build its understanding of climate-related risks and opportunities and to assess and monitor their relative potential impacts. To support this, DPC is undertaking a whole of department climate-related risk maturity self-assessment. DPC recognises the importance of considering the actual and potential impacts of climate-related risks and opportunities for business and financial planning. These include:

  • reducing greenhouse gas emissions resulting from DPC’s operations in line with Victorian Government commitments
  • improving environmental performance monitoring, evaluation and reporting
  • supporting the continuing uptake of renewable energy and other low-emissions technologies across Victoria
  • monitoring the impact of increased temperatures and extreme heat on DPC operations, including the health and safety of staff operating outdoors.

DPC’s Risk Management Framework requires consideration of the operating context, including climate change, to identify, assess and manage risks and opportunities. The framework is aligned to the Victorian Government Risk Management Framework and provides guidance for designing, implementing, monitoring, reviewing and continually improving risk management throughout DPC.

Climate-related risks are assessed and managed at the strategic, operational and program/project levels, including through operational risk management activities and climate-related programs.

DPC reports climate-related metrics in line with FRD 24, aligning with government reporting requirements. Data is obtained from suppliers, equipment metering, reports and surveys and is used to assess and manage relevant climate-related risks and opportunities.

DPC works with internal and external stakeholders towards achieving the targets established under Victoria’s Climate Change Strategy 2021–2030 as follows:

  • The Victorian Government will source 100 per cent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2025.
  • From 2021, all new Victorian Government buildings will have embedded environmentally sustainable design with a minimum five-star energy performance rating to apply to new office buildings and tenancy fit-outs. This will be increased to six-star (the highest rating for office buildings) in 2025.
  • Government leases will also preference higher rated buildings and those with Green Lease Schedules.

Greenhouse gas emissions

DPC reports on greenhouse gas emissions broken down into emissions ‘scopes’ consistent with national and international reporting standards. Scope 1 emissions are from sources that DPC owns or controls, such as burning fossil fuels in vehicles or machinery. Scope 2 emissions are indirect emissions from DPC’s use of electricity from the grid, which still uses coal and gas-fired power generation. Scope 3 emissions are indirect emissions from sources DPC does not control but does influence. DPC reports only scope 3 emissions from corporate air travel and waste disposal.

Total greenhouse gas emissions associated with air travel for 2020–21 and 2021–22 was zero due to carbon offsets being purchased through the booking agency as directed by the Department of Treasury and Finance. No carbon offsets were purchased through the booking agency for 2022–23, with the greenhouse gas emissions for air travel at 177 tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e). Data is calculated using total passenger kilometres and the average emissions factor of 1.43198 × 10–4 tonnes/passenger kilometres for domestic aviation.

Indicator 2022–23 2021–22 2020–21
Total scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions (tonnes CO2-e) [Indicator G1]122142155
Total scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions (tonnes CO2-e) [Indicator G2]1,5002,3252,650
Total scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions from commercial air travel and waste disposal (tonnes CO2-e) [Indicator G3]203NCNC

Electricity production and consumption

DPC’s electricity consumption covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street, 1 Treasury Place, 3 Treasury Place, 1 Spring Street and 35 Collins Street.

The total electricity consumption for DPC over the 2022–23 reporting period was 1,930 megawatt hours (MWh), which is a 7 per cent decrease from the previous reporting period.

DPC exclusively leases offices with electricity, gas and water as the sole energy sources, without ownership or access to any other energy sources.

Indicator 2022–23(1) 2021–22 2020–21
Total electricity consumption (MWh) [Indicator EL1]
Purchased electricity — consolidated
Department offices1,9302,0762,339

Note:

(1) These include the offices of DPC, offices that are no longer part of DPC following machinery of government changes still co-locate in DPC tenancies, the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel, the Wage Inspectorate Victoria and the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal.

Stationary fuel use

The total fuels used in buildings over the 2022–23 reporting period was 2,247,123 megajoules (MJ), which is an 8 per cent increase from the previous reporting period. The increase can likely be attributed to the absence of remote work directives during this reporting period, allowing staff to operate without COVID-19 restrictions.

The total greenhouse gas emissions from stationary fuel consumption over the 2022–23 reporting period was 116 tonnes CO2-e, which is a 12 per cent decrease from the previous reporting period.

Indicator 2022–23(1) 2021–22 2020–21
Total fuels used in buildings and machinery (MJ) [Indicator F1]2,247,1232,076,1172,338,874
Buildings 2,247,1232,076,1172,338,874
Natural gas2,247,1232,076,1172,338,874
Machinery000
Diesel000
Greenhouse gas emissions from stationary fuel consumption (tonnes CO2-e) [Indicator F2]116132149

Note:

  1. These include the offices of DPC, offices that are no longer part of DPC following machinery of government changes but still co-locate in DPC tenancies, the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel, the Wage Inspectorate Victoria and the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal.

Transportation

DPC uses vehicles from the Shared Service Provider vehicle pool for its operational car travel.

Energy used in transport fuels decreased by 32 per cent, with the significant decrease attributed to an amended reporting methodology.

Total distance travelled by commercial air travel (passenger kilometres) for DPC over the
2022–23 reporting period increased by 190 per cent. This can be attributed to a full reporting cycle without restrictions on interstate and international travel.

Indicator 2022–23%2021–22%2020–21%
Number and proportion of vehicles [Indicator T2]188100NCNCNCNC
Road vehicles188100NCNCNCNC
Passenger vehicles 188100NCNCNCNC
Internal combustion engines 10656NCNCNCNC
Petrol9349NCNCNCNC
Diesel/biodiesel137NCNCNCNC
Hybrid 8043NCNCNCNC
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) 8043NCNCNCNC
Range-extended electric vehicle 00%NCNCNCNC
Electric propulsion21NCNCNCNC
Battery electric vehicle21NCNCNCNC
Fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV)00NCNCNCNC

Indicator 2022–23 2021–22 2020–21
Total energy used in transportation (MJ) [Indicator T1]97,998143,41887,065
Road vehicles
Passenger vehicles 97,998NCNC
Petrol86,859135,15826,368
Diesel11,1388,26055,430
Electricity (MWh)(1)NC 0146
Goods vehicles 000
Petrol000
Diesel000
Electricity (MWh)000
Greenhouse gas emissions from vehicle fleet (tonnes CO2 -e) [Indicator T3]7106.15
Road vehicles

Passenger vehicles

7

NC

NC

Petrol69.421.84
Diesel10.583.91
Electricity000.4
Goods vehicles 000
Petrol000
Diesel000
Electricity000
Total distance travelled by commercial air travel (passenger km) [Indicator T4]733,540252,87042,044

Note:

(1) Data gap for PHEVs on-site charging.

Total energy use

The total energy used by DPC over the 2022–23 reporting period was 9,294,341 MJ, which is a 4 per cent decrease from the previous reporting period.

Indicator 2022–23(1) 2021–22 2020–21
Total energy usage from fuels (stationary and transportation) (MJ) [Indicator E1]2,345,1212,219,5352,425,939
Total energy used from electricity (MJ) [Indicator E2]6.949,2207,474,0218,419,946
Total energy used segmented into renewable and
non-renewable sources (MJ) [Indicator E3]
9,294,3419,693,55610,845,885
Renewable1,295,335NCNC
Non-renewable7,999,006NCNC
Units of energy used normalised by full-time equivalent (FTE) employees [Indicator E4](2)9,802NCNC

Notes:

(1) These include the offices of DPC, offices that are no longer part of DPC following machinery of government changes but still co-locate in DPC tenancies, the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel, the Wage Inspectorate Victoria and the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal.

(2) FTE includes other Victorian Government entity staff who are accommodated within a DPC-managed site — for example, co-location and machinery of government changes within the reporting period.

Sustainable buildings and infrastructure

Leases negotiated on behalf of DPC by the Shared Service Provider and Jones Lang LaSalle are done so with a Green Lease Schedule incorporated in the Standard Government Lease. During each lease negotiation, the Green Lease Schedule is put forward to the landlord or managing agent including where lease option periods are being executed. The Green Lease Schedule outlines obligations on both the landlord and tenant to maintain the property and/or premises to a minimum required National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) rating for energy, water, waste and/or indoor environment.

Environmentally sustainable design in new buildings and infrastructure

Two of DPC’s buildings have received environmental performance ratings. No other new buildings were commissioned by DPC in this reporting period.

Name of buildingBuilding typeRating SchemeRating
Levels 13–15, 35 Collins StreetOffice buildingNABERS4.5
Level 9, 1 Spring StreetOffice buildingNABERS5

Sustainable procurement

DPC continued to commit to the sustainable practice of environmental considerations in tender specifications for project-specific tender documents including environmentally sustainable outputs, business practices and implementation of Climate Change Policy objectives.

Water consumption

DPC’s water consumption reporting covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street, 1 Treasury Place, 3 Treasury Place, 1 Spring Street and 35 Collins Street.

Total water consumption for DPC over the 2022–23 reporting period was 2,970 kilolitres (kL), which is an increase of 33.7 per cent from the previous reporting period. The increase can likely be attributed to the absence of remote work directives during this reporting period, allowing staff to operate without COVID-19 restrictions.

Indicator 2022–23(1) 2021–22 2020–21
Total water consumption by an entity (kL) [Indicator W1]2,9702,2223,137
Potable water consumption2,9702,2223,137
Metered reused water consumption000
Units of metered water consumed normalised by FTE [Indicator W2](2)323

Notes:

  1. These include the offices of DPC, offices that are no longer part of DPC following machinery of government changes but still co-locate in DPC tenancies, the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel, the Wage Inspectorate Victoria and the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal.

FTE includes other Victorian Government entity staff who are accommodated within a DPC-mana

Waste and recycling

DPC’s waste reporting covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street, 1 Treasury Place, 3 Treasury Place, 1 Spring Street and 35 Collins Street.

Total waste generation for DPC over the 2022–23 reporting period was 32,901.24 kilograms (kg).

Indicator 2022–23(1)%2021–22(3)%2020–21(3)%
Total units of waste disposed (kg and %) [Indicator WR1]32,901.24100NCNCNCNC
Landfill (disposal)20,071.7261.01NCNCNCNC
Recycling/recovery (disposal)
Food organics, garden organics (FOGO)6,388.3619.42NCNCNCNC
Commingle2,706.618.23NCNCNCNC
Cardboard3,734.5511.35NCNCNCNC
Percentage of office sites that are covered by dedicated collection services [Indicator WR2]5100NCNCNCNC
Printer cartridges NCNCNCNCNCNC
Batteries NCNCNCNCNCNC
E-waste NCNCNCNCNCNC
Soft plasticsNCNCNCNCNCNC
Total units of waste disposed of normalised by FTE (kg/FTE) [Indicator WR3](2)34.69NCNCNCNCNC
Recycling rate (%) [Indicator WR4]38.99%NCNCNCNCNC
Greenhouse gas emissions associated with waste disposal (tonnes CO2-e) [Indicator WR5]26.09NCNCNCNCNC
Landfill 26.09NCNCNCNCNC
Other0NCNCNCNCNC

Notes:

(1) These include the offices of DPC, offices that are no longer part of DPC following machinery of government changes but still co-locate in DPC tenancies, the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel, the Wage Inspectorate Victoria and the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal.

(2) FTE includes other Victorian Government entity staff who are accommodated within a DPC-managed site — for example, co-location and machinery of government changes within the reporting period.

(3) Waste and recycling data from 2020–21 and 2021–22 is unavailable because waste audits were not carried out during these reporting periods due to low office attendance rates during COVID-19.

Legend

DSL: diesel

FTE: full-time equivalent employee

kg: kilograms

kL: kilolitres

km: kilometres

L: litres

LPG: liquefied petroleum gas

m2: square metres

MJ: megajoules

MWh: megawatt hour

CO2-e: carbon dioxide equivalent

ULP: unleaded petrol

Statutory compliance

Acts of Parliament

Acts of Parliament administered by the Premier

  • Administrative Arrangements Act 1983
  • Australia (Acts) Request Act 1985
  • Climate Change Act 2017
    sections 7, 8, 10, 14, 16, 41, 42, 50, 54 and 55 (these sections are jointly administered with the Minister for Climate Action)
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Climate Action and the Minister for the State Electricity Commission)
  • Commonwealth Arrangements Act 1958
  • Constitution Act 1975 — except:
    • section 72 (this section is administered by the Minister for Government Services)
    • Part III (this Part is administered by the Attorney-General)
    • Division 1 of Part IIIAA (this Division is jointly administered with the
      Attorney-General)
    • Divisions 3 to 6 of Part IIIAA (these Divisions are administered by the Attorney-General)
    • Part IIIA (this Part is administered by the Attorney-General)
    • section 88 in so far as it relates to the appointment of Crown Counsel and Crown Counsel (Advisings) (in so far as it relates to those matters, this section is administered by the
      Attorney-General)
  • section 88 in so far as it relates to the appointment of the Commissioner for Better Regulation (in so far as it relates to those matters, this section is administered by the Assistant Treasurer)
  • Constitution (Appointments) Act 2009
  • Crown Land (Reserves) Act 1978
    • in so far as it relates to the land shown as Crown Allotment 2036, City of Melbourne, Parish of Melbourne South (Parish Plan No. 5514D) reserved for Public Purposes (Government House and Grounds)
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Assistant Treasurer, the Minister for Corrections, the Minister for Environment, the Minister for Health, the Minister for Planning, the Minister for Ports and Freight and the Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events)
  • Electoral Act 2002 — Division 1 of Part 5, section 72 and Part 9A
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Attorney-General and the Minister for Government Services)
  • Essential Services Act 1958
  • Family Violence Reform Implementation Monitor Act 2016
  • Inquiries Act 2014
  • Melbourne Cricket Ground Act 2009

(The Act is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Planning and the Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events)

  • Melbourne and Olympic Parks Act 1985
  1. (The Act is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Planning and the Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events — except:
  • sections 24–28 [these sections are administered by the Minister for Environment])
  • Members of Parliament (Standards) Act 1978
  1. (The Act is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Government Services)
  • Ombudsman Act 1973 — sections 3–6
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Attorney-General)
  • Parliamentary Administration Act 2005
    • Part 2 and sections 11, 14–17
    • Parts 4 and 5 (these Parts are jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Government Services)
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Parliamentary Committees Act 2003 except:
    • sections 7, 7A and 52 (in so far as these sections relate to public interest disclosures about conduct by or in the Victorian Inspectorate, these sections are jointly and severally administered with the Attorney-General)
  • Parliamentary Salaries, Allowances and Superannuation Act 1968
    • in so far as the Act relates to the compliance, monitoring and enforcement regime for parliamentary allowances
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Assistant Treasurer and the Minister for Government Services)
  • Project Development and Construction Management Act 1994 — except:
    • section 11 in so far as it relates to a project nominated under section 6 for which the Secretary referred to in Part 5A is the facilitating agency (in so far as it relates to those matters, this section is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Planning and the Minister for Transport and Infrastructure)
    • Part 4 (this Part is administered by the Assistant Treasurer)
    • Part 5A (this Part is jointly and severally administered by the Minister for Planning and the Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, except to the extent that it relates to the exercise of powers and functions under Part 9A of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, in so far as it relates to those powers and functions this Part is administered by the Minister for Planning)
    • section 46 (this section is administered by the Minister for Planning)
    • Part 7 (this Part is administered by the Minister for Planning)
    • Parts 8 and 9 (these Parts are jointly and severally administered by the Minister for Planning and the Minister for Transport and Infrastructure)
  • Public Administration Act 2004
    • Parts 1, 2 and 8, section 67(3)(d) and Divisions 2 and 3 of Part 6 (these provisions are jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Government Services)
    • Part 3
    • Part 5A
    • sections 66, 98–98A
    • Part 7A

(The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)

  • Public Records Act 1973
    • in so far as the Act relates to public records in the possession of, transferred from or to be transferred from the Cabinet Office
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Public Safety Preservation Act 1958
  • Public Sector (Union Fees) Act 1992
  • Senate Elections Act 1958
  • Statute Law Revision Acts
  • Subordinate Legislation Act 1994 — sections 5A, 9 and 12G
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Succession to the Crown (Request) Act 2013
  • Superannuation (Public Sector) Act 1992
  • Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal and Improving Parliamentary Standards Act 2019
    • Part 4 and section 36 (these provisions are jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Government Services)
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Vital State Industries (Works and Services) Act 1992
  • Vital State Projects Act 1976 — except:
    • sections 5–16 (these sections are administered by the Attorney-General)
  • Wrongs (Public Contracts) Act 1981

Acts of Parliament administered by the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples

  • Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006
  • Aboriginal Lands Act 1970
  • Aboriginal Lands Act 1991
  1. (The Act is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Environment)
  • Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act 2018
  • Traditional Owner Settlement Act 2010
  • Treaty Authority and Other Treaty Elements Act 2022

Acts of Parliament administered by the Minister for Industrial Relations

  • Child Employment Act 2003
  • Construction Industry Long Service Leave Act 1997
  • Fair Work (Commonwealth Powers) Act 2009
  • Labour Hire Licensing Act 2018
  • Long Service Leave Act 2018
  • Long Service Benefits Portability Act 2018
  • Outworkers (Improved Protection) Act 2003
  • Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Act 2005
  • Public Sector Employment (Award Entitlements) Act 2006
  • Trade Unions Act 1958
  • Wage Theft Act 2020

Acts of Parliament administered by the Minister for Government Services

This list includes only the Acts of Parliament for which DPC supports the Minister for Government Services

  • Constitution Act 1975, section 72
  1. (The Act is otherwise administered by the Assistant Treasurer, the Attorney-General and the Premier)
  • Electoral Act 2002 — except:
    • Division 1 of Part 5, section 72 and Part 9A (these provisions are administered by the Premier)
    • Part 8 (this Part is administered by the Attorney-General)
  • Electoral Boundaries Commission Act 1982
  • Members of Parliament (Standards) Act 1978
  1. (The Act is jointly and severally administered with the Premier)
  • Parliamentary Administration Act 2005 except:
    • Part 2 and sections 11, 14–17 (these provisions are administered by the Premier)
    • Parts 4 and 5 (these Parts are jointly and severally administered with the Premier)
  • Parliamentary Precincts Act 2001
  • Parliamentary Salaries, Allowances and Superannuation Act 1968 — except:
    • sections 6(6), 9K(3), 9K(5) and 9L (these sections are administered by the Assistant Treasurer)
    • Part 3 (this Part is administered by the Assistant Treasurer)
    • in so far as the Act relates to the compliance, monitoring and enforcement regime for parliamentary allowances (in so far as the Act relates to those matters, the Act is administered by the Premier)
  • Public Administration Act 2004 — except:
    • Parts 1, 2 and 8, section 67(3)(d) and Divisions 2 and 3 of Part 6 (these provisions are jointly and severally administered with the Premier)
    • Part 3 (this Part is administered by the Premier)
    • Part 5A (this Part is administered by the Premier)
    • sections 66, 98–98A (these sections are administered by the Premier)
    • Part 7A (this Part is administered by the Premier)
  • Subordinate Legislation Act 1994 except:
    • sections 5A, 9 and 12G (these sections are administered by the Premier)
  • Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal and Improving Parliamentary Standards Act 2019 — except:
    • Part 4 and section 36 (these provisions are jointly and severally administered with the Premier)

Compliance with the Aboriginal Heritage Act

Under section 192 of the Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006, the Secretary must report on the operation of the Act including:

  • the exercise and performance by authorised officers of their powers, functions and duties under the Act
  • any complaints received in relation to authorised officers
  • actions taken to address those complaints.

The Act establishes the role of authorised officers and makes provision for appointing authorised officers. The key functions to be carried out by an authorised officer include:

  • monitoring compliance with the Act
  • investigating suspected offences against the Act
  • directing the conduct of a cultural heritage audit to assess the impact of an activity on Aboriginal cultural heritage
  • issuing and delivering stop orders without formal approval if there are reasonable grounds for believing that Aboriginal cultural heritage is under threat from an activity.

On 30 June 2023:

  • 25 authorised officers, all DPC employees, are appointed under the Act
  • 12 Aboriginal heritage officers, all employees of a Registered Aboriginal Party, are also appointed under the Act.

All appointees have successfully completed a Certificate IV in Government Investigations within the past five years and receive ongoing training about the operation of the Act. There were no complaints made about authorised officers during this period.

In 2022–23 authorised officers exercised their powers, functions and duties as set out on the following page.

Information on the exercise and performance by authorised officers of their powers, functions and duties under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006

SectionFunction/powerExercised
83Cultural heritage audit must be conducted under the direction of an authorised officerNo cultural heritage audits were conducted
84Give a written report of the findings of a cultural heritage audit to the ministerNo written reports were provided to the minister
159(a)Monitor compliance with the Act81 inspections were carried out by authorised officers to monitor compliance with the Act
159(b)Investigate suspected offences against the Act109 investigations were carried out or are ongoing
159(c)Direct the conduct of cultural heritage auditsNo cultural heritage audits were ordered
159(d)Issue and deliver stop ordersEight stop orders were issued or delivered
159(e)Report to the SecretaryNo reports were required
165Present identification card for inspectionIdentification cards were presented for inspection on 81 occasions
166Enter land or premises with the consent of the occupierGeneral powers to enter land or premises were used 74 times
167Obtain consent to enter land or premisesLand or premises were entered 81 times with the consent of the occupier
168Enter land or premises open to the publicLand or premises open to the public were entered 21 times
169Enter land or premises for a cultural heritage auditNo land was entered for the purposes of a cultural heritage audit
170Search upon entrySearch powers on entering land were executed 102 times
171Seizure powers on entry without search warrantSeizure powers by consent were exercised twice
172Seizure powers without consentSeizure powers without consent were not required
173Search warrantsOne search warrant was obtained
176Receipts for seized thingsTwo receipts were issued
177Security of seized thingsTwo seized things (records) were required to be secured
178(4)Return of seized objectsNo seized things were required to be returned
180Require the giving of name and addressNo one was required to give their name and address
181Require the giving of assistance and informationNo one was required to provide assistance or information
182Take affidavitsNo affidavits were taken
184Report to be given about entryOne report about entry was required

Full details of all powers and functions exercised by authorised officers in previous years can be requested via email to the Director, Heritage Services, First Peoples – State Relations at aboriginal.heritage@dpc.vic.gov.au(opens in a new window).

Compliance with the Building Act

DPC complied with its obligations under the Building Act 1993, the Building Regulations 2006 and associated statutory requirements and amendments. An occupancy permit or certificate of final inspection endorsed by a registered building surveyor is obtained for all upgrades to existing facilities requiring a permit. Design consultants and building contractors engaged are registered practitioners, and registrations are maintained during the course of the work.

DPC manages Government House and its outbuildings. There are several mechanisms for inspection, reporting and carrying out of maintenance works at this site including:

  • regular property inspections conducted by staff, tenants and external contractors
  • independent, formal condition audits undertaken every five years
  • site risk surveys undertaken at least biennially by the Victorian Managed Insurance Authority
  • onsite facilities managers responding to and prioritising identified issues and managing breakdown, preventative and cyclical maintenance contracts.

Major works projects (greater than $50,000)

Government House Drive, Melbourne: Conservation and restoration building works at Government House

Compliance with the Carers Recognition Act

The department has taken all practical measures to comply with its obligations under the Carers Recognition Act 2012.
These include considering the carerelationships principles set out in theAct when setting policies and providing services.

For example, this may be done through:

  • ensuring flexible work arrangements are embedded as part of the DPC working culture (in line with requirements under the Gender Equality Act 2020) and are available to all staff for any reason, including supporting employees with family and caring responsibilities
  • embedding a hybrid working model to support diversity, inclusion and a more equitable workplace
  • providing the Parental Leave Transition Support Coaching Program.

Obligation with the Act is also undertaken by ensuring DPC staff have an awareness and understanding of the care relationship principles set out in the Act.

This is achieved through:

  • championing the DPC Enablers Network, a network run by people with disability for people with disability, with an executive sponsor, open to all staff including carers
  • delivering a mental health and
    wellbeing training program for all staff and leaders including those who have caring responsibilities
  • providing support to all staff through the Peer Support Program and the Employee Assistance Program.

Compliance with the Gender Equality Act

DPC acknowledges gender diversity within its workforce and is committed to developing strategies that promote opportunities for
all staff.

DPC’s obligation under the Gender Equality Act 2020 began on 31 March 2020 and requires defined entities including the public sector, local councils and universities to take positive action towards achieving workplace gender equality.

Under the Act, DPC is required to:

  • develop and implement a Gender Equality Action Plan, which includes the results of a workplace gender audit and strategies for achieving workplace gender equality
  • promote gender equality in policies, programs and services that affect the public
  • complete gender impact assessments
  • publicly report on progress in relation to workplace gender equality.

The Act also requires defined entities to consider intersectionality when developing strategies and measures to promote gender equality in the workplace.

DPC has taken appropriate actions to comply with the Act during 2022–23 including continuing to implement DPC’s Gender Equality Action Plan.

Key achievements under the Gender Equality Action Plan include:

  • establishing a Gender Equality Network at DPC
  • exceeding the 50 per cent target for female executives at DPC
  • developing gender pay guidelines to support executive remuneration reviews
  • continuing to nominate women onto leadership programs
  • continuing to embed DPC’s Flexible Working Policy.

Competitive neutrality policy

Competitive neutrality requires government businesses to ensure that, where services compete or potentially compete with the private sector, any advantage arising solely from their government ownership be removed if it is not in the public interest. Government businesses must cost these services as if they were privately owned. The Competitive Neutrality Policy supports fair competition between public and private businesses and provides government businesses with a tool to enhance decisions on resource allocation. This policy does not override other policy objectives of government and focuses on efficiency in service provision.

DPC continues to ensure Victoria fulfils its requirements on competitive neutrality reporting for government businesses against the enhanced principles as required under the Competition Principles Agreement.

Compliance with the Disability Act

The department has complied with its obligations under the Disability Act 2006. DPC continues to proactively address the key actions under the DPC Disability and Access Inclusion Plan 2021–2025. This plan provides a framework for DPC to ensure equitable access to employment opportunities for people with disability.

Highlights under the Act during
2022–23 include:

  • reducing barriers to people with disability obtaining and maintaining employment, including reviewing the DPC Workplace Adjustment Policy, which ensures accessibility for employees who may need adjustments to equipment or process to undertake their roles
  • achieving tangible changes in attitudes and practices that discriminate against people with disability.

This is achieved through actions including:

  • having a dedicated Senior Adviser, Disability Access and Inclusion who is active in promoting access and inclusion
  • partnering with the Australian Network on Disability (AND) to deliver disability confidence training to the DPC Board of Management
  • undertaking an ongoing communications campaign to promote completion and awareness of the key initiatives of the DPC Disability Inclusion Action Plan
  • supporting neurodiverse employees and their managers to access the Victorian Public Sector Neurodiverse Confident Services Panel for workplace adjustments and supports.

DPC promotes inclusion and participation in the community through:

  • supporting a staff-led Enablers Network with a dedicated executive champion to represent the needs, interests and concerns of employees with lived experience of disability
  • continuing to partner with AND in
    2022–23 (AND is a national, membership-based, for-purpose organisation that supports organisations to advance inclusion for people with disability).

Compliance with the Freedom of Information Act

The Freedom of Information Act 1982 gives the public a right to access documents held by DPC. The purpose of the Act is to extend as far as possible the right of the community to access information held by government departments, local councils, ministers and other bodies subject to the Act.

An applicant has a right to apply for access to any document held by DPC, which comprises documents both created and received by DPC. Other than regular electronic and paper records, applicants may also request access to documents such as maps, films, computer discs and tape recordings.

The Act allows DPC to refuse access, either fully or partially, to certain documents or information. Examples of documents that may not be accessed include Cabinet documents, certain internal working documents, law enforcement documents, documents covered by legal professional privilege, documents containing personal information, documents containing certain commercial and financial information, and information provided to DPC in confidence.

If an applicant is not satisfied with a freedom of information decision made by DPC, under section 49A of the Act they have the right to seek a review from the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner within 28 days of receiving a decision letter.

Requests received in 2022–23 include 61 requests for DPC documents and 18 requests for documents from the Premier’s office.

No requests were received during this period for any other DPC portfolio ministers.

The department finalised 54 freedom of information requests to DPC during 2022–23.

Seventy per cent of access decisions were made within the statutory period, 9 per cent were between one and 45 days overdue and 20 per cent were overdue by more than 45 days. DPC also finalised 13 requests for the Office of the Premier and one for the Office of the Minister for Treaty and First Peoples.

Eight DPC matters went to the Information Commissioner for review and five complaints about DPC matters were made to the Information Commissioner.

Making a request

Requests to access documents should be made in writing to DPC’s Freedom of Information Officer. The requirements of a request are set out in section 17 of the Act.

In summary, a request should:

  • be in writing
  • identify as clearly as possible the documents requested
  • be accompanied by the appropriate application fee (which may be waived if it would cause hardship to the applicant).

Requests for documents in DPC’s possession should be addressed to:

Freedom of Information Officer Department of Premier and Cabinet

GPO Box 4912

Melbourne VIC 3001

Requests can also be lodged via online.foi.vic.gov.au. Access charges may apply once documents have been processed and an access decision has been made.

For example, charges may be applied for costs associated with photocopying and for search and retrieval of documents.

More information about DPC’s freedom of information arrangements can be found at www.vic.gov.au/foi-part-ii-statements.

Compliance with the Local Jobs First Act

The Local Jobs First Act 2003, introduced in August 2018, brings together the Victorian Industry Participant Guarantee and the Major Project Skills Guarantee Policy, which were previously administered separately.

Departments and public sector bodies are required to apply the Local Jobs First Policy in all projects valued at $3 million or more in Metropolitan Melbourne or for statewide projects, or $1 million or more for projects in regional Victoria.

During 2022–23 DPC had one Local Jobs
First Standard project valued at $2.0 million under contract. The project was in metropolitan Melbourne. No projects began in regional Victoria or were deemed as statewide. The Major Projects Skills Guarantee did not apply to this project. Of the four Local Jobs First projects in progress, the expected outcomes are:

  • a 97 per cent of local content commitment
  • the retention of five jobs (annualised employee equivalent).

Compliance with the Public Interest Disclosure Act

The Public Interest Disclosures Act 2012 encourages and assists people in making disclosures of improper conduct by public officers and public bodies. The Act protects people who make disclosures in keeping with the Act and establishes a system for the matters disclosed to be investigated and rectifying action to be taken.

DPC does not tolerate improper conduct by employees, nor the taking of reprisals against those who come forward to disclose such conduct. DPC is committed to ensuring transparency and accountability in administrative and management practices and supports the making of disclosures
that reveal corrupt conduct, conduct involving a substantial mismanagement of public resources, or conduct involving a substantial risk to public health and safety or the environment.

DPC will take all reasonable steps to protect people who make such disclosures from any detrimental action in reprisal for making the disclosure. DPC will also afford natural justice to the person who is the subject of the disclosure to the extent it is legally possible.

Reporting procedures

Disclosures of improper conduct or detrimental action by DPC or any employees may be made to any of the following departmental personnel:

  • Secretary of the department
  • Public Interest Disclosure Coordinator
  • manager or supervisor of the discloser
  • manager or supervisor of the person who is the subject of the disclosure
  • a person acting in any of the above roles.

Alternatively, disclosures may also be made directly to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission:

Level 1, North Tower, 459 Collins Street

Melbourne VIC 3000

Phone: 1300 735 135

Internet: www.ibac.vic.gov.au

Refer to this website for the secure email disclosure process, which also provides for anonymous disclosures.

More information

The Guide to Making and Handling Public Interest Disclosures, which outlines the system for reporting disclosures of improper conduct or detrimental action by DPC or any of its employees and/or officers, is available on DPC’s website (www.vic.gov.au/dpc-public-interest-disclosures).

Disclosures under the Public Interest Disclosures Act 2012

In 2022–23 two assessable disclosures were made to DPC and notified to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission. This is an increase from 2021–22 in which no assessable disclosures were made.

Email: info@ibac.vic.gov.au

Section 5: Appendices

Appendix 1: Budget portfolio outcomes

The budget portfolio outcomes statements provide a comparison between the actual financial information of all general government entities within the portfolio and the forecast financial information published in the State Budget Papers by the Department of Treasury and Finance.

The budget portfolio outcomes statements comprise the comprehensive operating statement, balance sheet, cash flow statement, statement of changes in equity and the administered items statement.

The budget portfolio outcomes statements have been prepared on a consolidated basis and include all general government entities within the portfolio. Consistent with the budget papers, financial transactions and balances are classified into either ‘controlled’ or ‘administered’.

The budget portfolio outcomes statements that follow are not subject to audit by the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office.

They are not prepared on the same basis as the Department of Premier and Cabinet’s (DPC) financial statements because they also include the consolidated financial information of the following entities:

  • Victorian Electoral Commission
  • Victorian Public Sector Commission.

Appendix 2: Workforce data

The comparative workforce data and Executive Officer data provided in this appendix are based on the following definitions:

  • For a department, a member of the Senior Executive Service (SES) is defined as a person employed as an executive under Part 3 of the Public Administration Act 2004.
  • For a portfolio entity, an executive is defined as a person employed as an executive under Part 3 of the Public Administration Act or a person to whom the Victorian Government’s Public Entity Executive Remuneration Policy applies.
  • The definition of an SES does not include a statutory office holder, an accountable officer or an administrative office head.

All figures in the following tables reflect employment levels at the last full pay period in June 2023 and June 2022.

Comparative data

Comparison data tables 1-5
Word 197 KB
(opens in a new window)

Executive officer data

The table below discloses the variations in SES, broken down by gender, between the current and previous reporting periods for DPC, excluding SES supporting the Yoorrook Justice Commission.

DPC Senior Executive Service numbers for 2023 and 2022

ClassMen 2023Men 2022Men VarWomen 2023Women 2022Women VarSelf-described 2023Self-described 2022Self-described VarTotal 2023Total 2022Total Var
SES 324–224–200048–4
SES 2911–21015–50001926–7
SES 11019–92339–160003358–25
Total2134–133558–230005692–36

The table below discloses the variations in SES, broken down by gender, between the current and previous reporting periods for DPC portfolio entities that have been consolidated into the annual report.

DPC portfolio entity Senior Executive Service numbers for 2023 and 2022

Portfolio entityMen 2023Men 2022Men VarWomen 2023Women 2022Women VarSelf-described 2023Self-described 2022Self-described VarTotal 2023Total 2022Total Var
Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel110211000321
Office of the Governor12–111000023–1
Wage Inspectorate Victoria101110000211
Total330431000761

The table below provides a reconciliation of executive numbers presented between the report of operations and the financial statements. The table excludes SES employed by the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel, the Office of the Governor, the Wage Inspectorate Victoria and SES supporting the Yoorrook Justice Commission.

Reconciliation of DPC Senior Executive Service numbers

20232022
Executives73109
Accountable Officer (Secretary)11
LessSeparations1817
Total executive numbers5693

The table below discloses the annualised total salary for senior employees of DPC categorised by classification. The salary amount is reported as the full-time annualised salary. The table excludes SES employed by the Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel, the Office of the Governor, the Wage Inspectorate Victoria and SES supporting the Yoorrook Justice Commission.

Annualised total salary, by $20,000 bands, for executives and other senior non-executive staff

Income band (salary)(2)ExecutivesSTSPSSMASRAOther
< $160,000
$160,000–$179,999 1
$180,000–$199,999 4(1)
$200,000–$219,99919(1)5
$220,000–$239,99912(1)1
$240,000–$259,9991
$260,000–$279,9997
$280,000–$299,9999
$300,000–$319,9994
$320,000–$339,999
$340,000–$359,999
$360,000–$379,999
$380,000–$399,9991
$400,000–$419,999
$420,000–$439,9992
$440,000–$459,999
$460,000–$479,999
$480,000–$499,9991
> $500,000
Total5611

Legend: FTE: full-time equivalent; STS: senior technical specialists; PS: principal scientists; SMA: senior medical advisers; SRA: senior regulatory analysts

Notes:

  1. Includes employees on part-time arrangements, which cover the following FTE: 0.60, 0.80 and 0.90 FTE.
  2. Executives’ remuneration includes superannuation.

Workforce inclusion policy

DPC is committed to creating a workforce that is genuinely inclusive and better reflects the diversity of the communities served.

The table on page 174 outlines the progress DPC has made against key workforce inclusion targets relating to gender profiles at the executive level, people with disability and employees who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

Gender profile at the executive levels

DPC acknowledges gender diversity within its workforce and is committed to developing strategies that promote opportunities for all staff, including gender diverse employees.

Consistent with Safe and Strong: A Victorian Gender Equality Strategy, DPC has a target to ensure at least 50 per cent of women are represented in executive-level officer roles. The representation of women in executive-level roles was 63 per cent in 2022–23.

Under the Gender Equality Act 2020, DPC has a Gender Equality Action Plan that outlines strategies and measures for promoting gender equality in the workplace. The plan considers the needs of all employees including gender diverse staff and examines intersectional gender inequality.

People with disability

Consistent with Getting to Work: Victorian Public Sector Disability Employment Action Plan 2018–2025, DPC has a target of 12 per cent employment of people with disability by 2025. This target is supported by DPC’s Disability Access and Inclusion Plan
2021–2025, an Enablers Network that continues to advocate for issues affecting employees with disability and a dedicated Senior Adviser, Disability Access and Inclusion role, which oversees the improvements to attracting and supporting people with disability through inclusive recruitment, retention and promotion practices.

The Workforce Inclusion Policy table on page 174 shows DPC has fallen back against this target in 2022–23, with no employees disclosing a disability, a decrease from 0.2 per cent in 2021–22. This decrease may be attributed to machinery of government changes on 1 January 2023. People Matter Survey data reports that 9 per cent of DPC staff identify as a person with disability, an increase from 8 per cent in the 2022 survey. The discrepancy between data sources may be due to the survey’s anonymity.

DPC continues to work towards a culture where staff feel comfortable and confident to share diversity information that can inform future workplace inclusion strategies.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander staff

DPC is committed to improving the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander staff by creating a culturally safe workplace, strengthening cultural capability and providing flexible and progressive career opportunities.

Barring Djinang is the Victorian public sector’s five-year Aboriginal employment strategy. The strategy adopts an Aboriginal employment target of 2 per cent for the Victorian public sector. DPC met this target in 2022–23, with 3.3 per cent of staff identifying as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

While this represents an increase compared with 2.3 per cent in 2021–22, the overall number of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander staff at DPC has decreased. However, the data represents an increased proportion of Aboriginal and/or Torres
Strait Islander staff due to the reduction in DPC’s size following machinery of government changes.

Under the Victorian Government Self-Determination Reform Framework, DPC consulted on a new Aboriginal Workforce Strategy in 2022–23, which continues to be reviewed internally. The strategy aims to create a culturally safe workplace and support the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander staff across DPC.

Workforce inclusion policy progress

Workforce Inclusion Policy initiativeTarget

2022–23 actual %

(headcount)

2021–22 actual %

(headcount)

Gender profile at executive levelsRepresentation of at least 50 per cent women in executive officer roles63.063.0
People with disabilityPeople with disability at DPC increases to 12 per cent by 2025(1)0.00.2
Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander staffBarring Djinang has adopted an Aboriginal employment target of 2 per cent for the Victorian public service(2)3.32.3

Notes:

  1. Headcount is based on payroll system data. Note, however, that DPC’s 2023 People Matter Survey results indicate that 9 per cent of DPC’s survey respondents identify as a person with disability.
  2. Headcount is based on payroll system data. Note, however, that DPC’s 2023 People Matter Survey results indicate that 4 per cent of DPC’s survey respondents identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

Occupational health and safety management

DPC is committed to operating in a safe and responsible manner that respects the health, safety and wellbeing of staff.

The commitment includes complying with applicable laws, regulations, standards and codes as well as fostering an environment that enables staff to contribute to the continuous improvement of health and safety in their workplace.

A culture committed to high safety standards, incorporating the Victorian public sector Leading the Way framework encourages DPC to take a holistic and inclusive approach to supporting physical health and mental wellbeing at work.

Vision: A workforce that demonstrates both physical and psychosocially safe practices in all aspects of our work.

Mission: To develop a holistic, values-aligned, integrated approach to health, safety and wellbeing.

DPC is moving forward in establishing a supportive and robust safety culture where a drive for safety culture is being shaped and the aim is not about leading safety but leading safely. In supporting safety culture, DPC has committed to redeveloping a health, safety and wellbeing strategy with a strong focus on psychosocial safety.

During 2022–23 DPC worked to review and implement health, safety and wellbeing measures and initiatives that contribute to maintaining the health, safety and wellbeing of all staff. Measures focused on supporting staff wellbeing through the machinery of government changes, and promoting physical health and wellbeing. A review of all health, safety and wellbeing policies and procedures was launched to ensure they align with the newly redeveloped health, safety and wellbeing strategy and identify any gaps that need to be addressed. In addition, updates were made to the
COVID-19 vaccination policy to align with the current health advice and with Victoria’s
COVID-19 landscape.

During 2022–23 DPC continued to support mental wellbeing through initiatives and training in managing mental wellbeing in the workplace.

Incident management

Reported incidents across DPC increased by 2.75 per cent per 100 FTE staff in 2022–23, with 18 incidents reported. This increase equates to 13 more incidents reported compared with the previous year. Incidents include incidents, injuries and near misses.

Similar to the previous year, ‘slips, trips, falls and bumps’ and ‘sprains/strains’ were equally the most commonly reported incident types. The increase in the number of incidents reported this year is attributed to improved employee awareness of reporting incidents, as well as an increase in staff transitioning back into the office environment.

There were no notifiable incidents across DPC in 2022–23. Notifiable incidents are those that require the occupational health and safety (OHS) regulator (WorkSafe) to be notified if they occur.

Number of incidents and rate per 100 FTE

Number of incidents and rate per 100 FTE - full description below image

Image description

A line graph which shows the number of incidents and rate of incidents per 100 FTE over the four year period 2019-20 to 2022-23.

The line graph shows the trend for the number of incidents as: between 25 and 30 in 2019-20; between 10 and 15 in 2020-21; between 5 and 10 for 2021-22; and between 15 and 20 for 2022-23.

The line graph shows the trend for the rate of incidents per 100 FTE as: between 2.4 and 3.0 in 2019-20; between 0.6 and 1.2 in 2020-21; between 0.6 and 1.2 in 2021-22; and between 3.0 and 3.6 in 2022-23.

DPC’s performance against occupational health and safety management measures

Incidents

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
Number of incidents(1)10518
Rate per 100 FTE1.080.653.40
Number of incidents requiring first aid or further medical treatment425

Incidents

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
Number of incidents(1)10518
Rate per 100 FTE1.080.653.40
Number of incidents requiring first aid or further medical treatment425

Management commitment

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
Evidence of OHS policy statement, OHS objectives, OHS plans and regular reporting to senior management about OHSCompletedCompletedCompleted
Evidence of OHS criteria in purchasing guidelines (including goods, services and personnel)CompletedCompletedCompleted

Consultation and participation

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
Compliance with agreed structure on designated work groups, health and safety representatives (HSRs) and issue resolution proceduresCompletedCompletedCompleted
Evidence of agreed structure of designated workgroups, HSRs and issue resolution proceduresCompletedCompletedCompleted
Number of quarterly OHS Committee meetings442

Risk management

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
Percentage of internal audits and inspections conducted as planned(2)n/a67%32%
Percentage of reported incidents investigated100%100%100%
Number of improvement notices
issued by a WorkSafe inspector
000
Number of prosecutions000

Percentage of issues arising from:

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
  • internal audits
n/an/an/a
  • HSR provisional improvement notices
n/an/an/a
  • WorkSafe notices
n/an/an/a

Training

Percentage of managers and staff who have received OHS training
(online induction module):

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
  • induction
93%93%94%
  • management training
93%93%96%
  • contractors and temps
n/an/an/a

Percentage of HSRs trained

Key performance indicator2020–212021–22202223
  • upon acceptance of the role (initial training)
31%33%33%
  • retraining (refresher)
8%7%0%

Appendix 3: Other information available on request

In compliance with the requirements of the Standing Directions of the Assistant Treasurer, details of items listed below have been retained by DPC and are available on request, subject to the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 1982. These items include:

  1. a statement that declarations of pecuniary interests have been duly completed by all relevant DPC officers
  2. details of shares held by a senior officer as nominee or held beneficially in a statutory authority or subsidiary
  3. details of publications produced by DPC about itself and how these can be obtained
  4. details of changes in prices, fees, charges, rates and levies charged by DPC
  5. details of any major external reviews carried out on DPC
  6. details of major research and development activities undertaken by DPC
  7. details of overseas visits undertaken, including a summary of the objectives and outcomes of each visit
  8. details of major promotional, public relations and marketing activities undertaken by DPC to develop community awareness of DPC and its services
  9. details of assessments and measures undertaken to improve the OHS
    of employees
  10. a general statement on industrial relations within DPC and details of time lost through industrial accidents and disputes
  11. a list of major committees sponsored by DPC, the purposes of each committee and the extent to which the purposes have been achieved
  12. details of all consultancies and contractors including:
    • consultants and contractors engaged
    • services provided
    • expenditure committed for each engagement.

This information is available on request from:

Director, DPC Corporate Governance
Department of Government Services
35 Collins Street
Melbourne VIC 3000

Email: budgetandreporting@dpc.vic.gov.au

Appendix 4: Disclosure index

DPC’s annual report is prepared in line with all relevant Victorian legislation and pronouncements. This index has been prepared to help identify DPC’s compliance with statutory disclosure requirements.

Standing Directions (SD) and Financial Reporting Directions (FRD)

Report of operations

Charter and purpose

LegislationRequirementPage
FRD 22Manner of establishment and the relevant ministers6–10, 69
FRD 22Purpose, functions, powers and duties1, 12–18
FRD 8Departmental objectives, indicators and outputs23–24
FRD 22Key initiatives and projects24–48
FRD 22Nature and range of services provided12–18

Management and structure

LegislationRequirementPage
FRD 22Organisational structure11

Financial and other information

LegislationRequirementPage
FRD 8Performance against output performance measures49–59
FRD 8Budget portfolio outcomes156–168
FRD 10Disclosure index178–180
FRD 12Disclosure of major contracts125
FRD 15Executive disclosures171–172
FRD 22Employment and conduct principles173–174
FRD 22Occupational health and safety policy174–176
FRD 22Summary of the financial results for the year120-121
FRD 22Significant changes in financial position during the year120-121
FRD 22Major changes or factors affecting performance120-121
FRD 22Subsequent events121
FRD 22Application and operation of the Freedom of Information Act 1982152–153
FRD 22Compliance with building and maintenance provisions of the Building Act 1993150
FRD 22Statement on National Competition Policy151
FRD 22Application and operation of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012153–154
FRD 22Application and operation of the Carers Recognition Act 2012150
FRD 22Details of consultancies over $10,000124–125
FRD 22Details of consultancies under $10,000125
FRD 22Disclosure of government advertising expenditure122
FRD 22Disclosure of information and communications technology expenditure123
FRD 22Statement of availability of other information177
FRD 22Disclosure of emergency procurement135
FRD 24Environmental reporting136–144
FRD 25Local Jobs First153
FRD 29Workforce data disclosures164–174
SD 5.2Specific requirements under Standing Direction 5.262

Compliance attestation and declaration

LegislationRequirementPage
SD 5.2.3Declaration in report of operations1
SD 5.1.4Attestation for compliance with Ministerial Standing Direction119

Financial statements

Declaration

LegislationRequirementPage
SD 5.2.2Declaration in financial statements62

Other requirements under Standing Directions 5.2

LegislationRequirementPage
SD 5.2.1(a)Compliance with Australian Accounting Standards and otherauthoritative pronouncements69–70
SD 5.2.1(a)Compliance with Standing Directions62
SD 5.2.1(b)Compliance with Model Financial Report62

Other disclosures as required by FRDs in notes to the financial statements

LegislationRequirementPage
FRD 9Departmental disclosure of administered assets and liabilities by activity113–114
FRD 11Disclosure of ex gratia expensesn/a
FRD 13Disclosure of parliamentary appropriations71–74
FRD 21Disclosures of responsible persons, executive officers and other personnel (contractors with significant management responsibilities) in the financial report104–108
FRD 103Non-financial physical assets93
FRD 110Cash flow statements67
FRD 112Defined benefit superannuation obligations75–76, 94
FRD 114Financial instruments — general government entities and public non-financial corporations98–100

Legislation

LegislationPage
Aboriginal Heritage Act 200613, 37-38, 40-41
Aboriginal Lands Act 1970 41
Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act 20182, 35-36, 128
Building Act 1993150
Carers Recognition Act 2012150
Child Employment Act 200332-33
Disability Act 2006151–152
Fair Work (Supporting Australia’s Jobs and Economic Recovery) Act 202131
Financial Management Act 19941, 62
Freedom of Information Act 1982152–153
Gender Equality Act 2020151
Human Source Management Act 202347
Inquiries Act 201436
Labour Hire Licensing Act 201832
Local Jobs First Act 2003153
Long Service Benefits Portability Act 201832
Mental Health and Wellbeing Act 202230
Native Title Act 1993112
Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Act 200532–33
Public Administration Act 20046, 16-17, 45-46, 70, 107-109, 164
Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012153–154
Traditional Owner Settlement Act 201042–43
Treaty Authority and Other Elements Act 202236
United Nations Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture (OPCAT) Act 202247
Victorian Future Fund Act 202347
Wage Theft Act 202033, 70

Contacts

Department of Premier and Cabinet

Secretary

1 Treasury Place

Melbourne VIC 3002

(GPO Box 4912, Melbourne VIC 3001)

Telephone: 03 9651 5111

Email: contact@dpc.vic.gov.au

www.dpc.vic.gov.au

Administrative offices

Office of the Governor

Official Secretary

Government House

Government House Drive

Melbourne VIC 3004

Telephone: 03 9655 4211

www.governor.vic.gov.au

Office of the Chief Parliamentary Counsel

Chief Parliamentary Counsel

Level 2, 1 Macarthur Street

East Melbourne VIC 3002

Telephone: 03 9651 2103

www.legislation.vic.gov.au