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  • The department implemented its Social Procurement Strategy in February 2019. The strategy prioritises 5 social procurement objectives, which are:

    • opportunities for Victorian Aboriginal people
    • women’s equality and safety
    • opportunities for disadvantaged Victorians
    • supporting safe and fair workplaces
    • environmentally sustainable outputs.

    In 2021–22, the department spent a total of $17.6 million through direct engagement of 119 verified social benefit suppliers. This represents an increase of around $6.2 million on 2010–21. The total spend includes a direct engagement worth $1.8 million with 33 verified Victorian Aboriginal businesses.

    The increase in 2021–22 expenditure is driven by engagements of social enterprises and Victorian Aboriginal businesses for major construction projects and related services, as well as the engagement of a social enterprise, as part of the distribution of air purifier units to schools.

    All procurement procedures for goods and services as well as construction works are aligned with the Social Procurement Framework.

    All suppliers to the department must attest to their commitment to the Victorian Government’s Supplier Code of Conduct when responding to the department’s approaches to market. This includes engagement with the Social Procurement Assurance team at the DTF on procurements estimated to be above $20.0 million.

    Social procurement in school construction

    The department requires all construction related projects to incorporate Social Procurement Framework objectives and outcomes. Evaluations of tender submissions are conducted to identify and recognise businesses whose practices support social and sustainable procurement objectives.

    Assessments are undertaken to review suppliers’ tender responses for the application of social and sustainable procurement objectives. Tender submissions are required to include responses to the following criteria:

    • employment for Victorian Aboriginal people
    • opportunities for disadvantaged Victorians
    • environmentally sustainable outputs.

    The department’s Capital Programs Assurance Service provides independent assurance on projects. It reviews the requirements in tender responses against social procurement objectives. Based on these reviews, VSBA projects have demonstrated a high level of compliance.

    In 2022, a revised Project Management Framework was developed to mandate the application of the Building Equality Policy. The department has updated its construction procurement plan templates and construction procurement guides to reflect the requirements of the policy to create employment opportunities for women through school construction activities.

  • Introduced in August 2018, the Local Jobs First Act 2003 brings together the Victorian Industry Participation Policy (VIPP) and Major Project Skills Guarantee (MPSG) policy, which were previously administered separately.

    Departments and public sector bodies are required to apply the Local Jobs First policy to all metropolitan Melbourne and statewide projects valued at $3 million or more, or $1 million or more in regional Victoria.

    MPSG applies to all construction projects valued at $20 million or more. The MPSG guidelines and VIPP guidelines continue to apply to MPSG applicable and VIPP applicable projects respectively, where contracts have been entered into prior to 15 August 2018.

    During 2021–22, the department commenced or completed a total of 152 Local Jobs First projects, totalling $1.8 billion. This includes 145 standard projects and 7 strategic projects. Metropolitan Victoria projects averaged 68% local content, and those based in regional Victoria averaged 70% local content. The statewide projects averaged 45% local content.

    Projects commenced – Local Jobs First Standard

    During 2021–22, the department commenced 96 Local Jobs First Standard Projects, valued at $775 million. The projects based in metropolitan Victoria averaged 74% local content, projects based in regional Victoria expect to use 62% local content and statewide projects expect to use 50% local content.

    The expected outcomes based on the reported and extrapolated information are:

    • an average of 70% local content overall
    • a total of 897,162 work hours created and 2,685,828 work retained [1]
    • an estimated 292,448 new apprenticeships and traineeships work hours created
    • an estimated 448,275 work hours for apprenticeships and traineeships retained.

    MPSG projects provided an estimated 91,219 annual work hours to 88 apprentices, trainees, and cadets.

    Projects completed – Local Jobs First Standard

    During 2021–22, the department completed 49 Local Jobs First Standard Projects, with a total value of $322 million. The projects based in metropolitan Victoria averaged 76% local content, and those based in regional Victoria averaged 70% local content and statewide projects averaged 45% local content.

    The expected outcomes based on reported and extrapolated information are:

    • an average of 73% local content
    • a total of 58,917 work hours created and 145,756 work retained
    • an estimated 15,638 new apprenticeships and traineeships work hours created an estimated 32,935 work hours for apprenticeships and traineeships retained.

    MPSG projects provided an estimated total of 17,479 annual work hours to 300 apprentices, trainees and cadets.

    Projects commenced – Local Jobs First Strategic

    During 2021–22, the department commenced 3 Local Jobs First Strategic Projects, valued at $359 million. The projects based in metropolitan Victoria expect to use 86% local content and statewide projects expect to use 84% local content.

    The expected outcomes based on the reported and extrapolated information are:

    • an average of 85% local content
    • a total of 93,771 work hours created and 1,008,150 work retained
    • an estimated 32,504 new apprenticeships and traineeships work hours created an estimated 81,306 work hours for apprenticeships and traineeships retained.

    MPSG projects provided an estimated total of 113,810 annual hours to 32 apprentices, trainees, and cadets.

    Projects completed – Local Jobs First Strategic

    During 2021–22, the department completed 4 Local Jobs First Strategic Projects, with a total value of $346 million. All projects were based in metropolitan Victoria and averaged 29% local content.

    The outcomes based on the reported information are:

    • an average of 29% local content
    • a total of 37,882 work hours created and 33,548 work retained
    • an estimated 37,881 new apprenticeships and traineeships work hours created an estimated 33,548 work hours for apprenticeships and traineeships retained.

    MPSG projects provided an estimated total of 71,430 annual work hours to 300 apprentices, trainees and cadets.

    Reporting requirements – grants

    For grants provided during 2021–22, a total of zero Interaction Reference Numbers were required, which entailed an engagement with the Industry Capability Network (Victoria) Ltd.

  • Campaigns with a media spend of $100,000 or greater (excluding GST) during 2021–22

  • Details of consultancies valued at $10,000 or greater

    In 2021–22, the department and the VSA recorded 42 consultancies whose total fees were $10,000 or greater. The total expenditure incurred in 2021–22 in relation to these consultancies is $9.9 million (excluding GST). Details of the individual consultancies are outlined in Department of Education and Training Annual Report 2021–22 Additional InformationExternal Link < www.vic.gov.au/department-education-and-training-annual-reports&gtExternal Link ;.

    Details of consultancies valued at less than $10,000

    In 2021–22, there were 2 consultancies whose total fees were less than $10,000.

  • In accordance with the VPS’ Information and Communication Technology (ICT) reporting standard, the department’s ICT expenditure is reported below. This includes ICT expenditure incurred by the VSA.

    ICT expenditure

    Measure

    $ million

    Business as usual ICT expenditure

    383.2

    Non-business as usual ICT expenditure

    • Operating expenditure

    5.8

    • Capital expenditure

    29.3

    Total ICT non-business as usual expenditure

    35.1

    Total ICT expenditure

    418.3

  • The department disclosed, in accordance with the requirements of government policy and accompanying guidelines, all contracts with a value greater than $10 million entered into during the year ended 30 June 2022. Details of contracts are disclosed in the Victorian Government contracts’ publishing system at www.buyingfor.vic.gov.auExternal Link .

    Contractual details have not been disclosed for contracts that are exempted under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (the FOI Act) or government guidelines.

    Procurement complaints

    Under the Governance Policy of the Victorian Government Purchasing Board, the department must disclose any formal complaints received through its procurement complaints management system.

    The department received one formal complaint through its procurement complaints management system in 2021–22 relating to an open market procurement in which the supplier queried the award process. It was found that all procurement policies and processes had been adhered to. An independent probity advisor had also been appointed to oversee the procurement.

    Procurement during critical incidents

    Under the Market Approach Policy of the Victorian Government Purchasing Board, the department is required to disclose summary information regarding procurement activity during a critical incident.

    Critical incident procurement protocols were implemented by the department on 7 September 2021 for specified procurement projects relating to the safety of students and staff at education settings in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. These protocols were still in place as at 30 June 2022.

    Total value of procurements made under critical incident protocols

    Goods and services purchased under critical incident protocols

    $ (ex GST)

    Goods purchased under protocols in 2021–22

    138,518,357

    Services purchased under protocols in 2021–22

    13,546,872

    Total

    152,065,229

  • The FOI Act allows the public a right to access documents held by the department. The purpose of the FOI Act is to extend as far as possible the community’s right to access information held by government departments, local councils, ministers and other bodies.

    People can apply to access documents created by, or supplied to, the department. They may also obtain access to maps, films, microfiche, photographs, computer printouts, computer discs, tape recordings and videotapes. Information about the type of material produced by the department is available at www.vic.gov.au/freedom-information-requests-department-education-and-training External Link .

    Under the FOI Act, the department can refuse public access to certain documents or information, either fully or partially. Examples of documents that the department may refuse access to include:

    • cabinet documents
    • some internal working documents
    • law‑enforcement documents
    • documents covered by legal professional privilege, such as legal advice
    • personal information about other people
    • information provided to the department in confidence.

    Under section 49A of the FOI Act, applicants who are not satisfied by a decision made by the department can seek a review by the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner within 28 days of receiving a decision on access.

    Freedom of Information statistics

    During 2021–22, the department received 761 FOI requests. Of these:

    • 690 were from individuals seeking access to their own records
    • 14 were requests from members of parliament
    • 35 were from media organisations
    • 22 were from members of the public seeking policy-related and other miscellaneous documents.

    The Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner was asked to review 22 requests, and 3 went on appeal to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

    This Annual Report contains the information required to be published pursuant to section 7 of the FOI Act. Further information is available at: www.vic.gov.au/freedom-information-requests-department-education-and-training External Link .

    Making a request

    A request for access to documents can be made by writing to the department’s FOI Unit. A request must:

    • be in writing
    • identify as clearly as possible the document(s) being requested
    • be accompanied by the appropriate application fee (the fee may be waived in certain circumstances).

    Access charges may be required in certain circumstances. Examples of access charges include charges for search, retrieval, and extraction of certain documents from databases.

    Freedom of Information contacts

    Agency

    Postal address

    Email

    Telephone

    Department of Education and Training

    Manager, Freedom of Information
    Department of Education and Training
    GPO Box 4367
    Melbourne 3001

    foi@education.vic.gov.au

    (03) 7022 0856

    VCAA

    Level 7
    2 Lonsdale Street
    Melbourne 3000

    vcaa.foi@education.vic.gov.au

    (03) 9032 1700

    VRQA

    Level 4
    2 Lonsdale Street
    Melbourne 3000

    vrqa@education.vic.gov.au

    (03) 9032 1554

    Merit Protection Boards

    Level 4
    2 Lonsdale Street
    Melbourne 3000

    meritboards@education.vic.gov.au

    (03) 7022 0040

    Victorian Institute of Teaching

    Level 9
    628 Bourke Street
    Melbourne 3000

    vit@vit.vic.edu.au

    (03) 8601 6100

    Disciplinary Appeals Boards

    Level 4
    2 Lonsdale Street
    Melbourne 3000

    dab@education.vic.gov.au

    (03) 7022 0040

    Independent office of School Dispute Resolutions

    Level 4
    2 Lonsdale Street
    Melbourne 3000

    school.resolution@education.vic.gov.au

    (03) 7022 1199

    VATL

    41 St Andrews Place
    Melbourne 3000

    academy@education.vic.gov.au

    (03) 8199 2900

    VSA

    GPO Box 4367 Melbourne 3001

    www.skillsauthority.vic.gov.au External Link

    (03) 9059 5107

    Further information regarding FOI can be found at www.vic.gov.au/freedom-information-requests-department-education-and-training External Link .

  • Consistent with the DataVic Access Policy issued by the Victorian Government in 2012, the department made 8 data sets available on the DataVic website in 2021–22. The information listed below and elsewhere in this Annual Report is available in electronic readable format at www.data.vic.gov.auExternal Link .

    The information includes:

    • progress towards achieving departmental objectives
    • performance against output performance measures
    • performance management of OHS and workers’ compensation management measures
    • comparative workforce data
    • SES workforce data
    • government advertising expenditure financial statements (key financial information)
    • Appendix 2 budget portfolio outcomes.
  • Mechanisms to ensure buildings conform to the building standards

    The department complies with the Building Act 1993, the National Construction Code and other statutory obligations related to constructing and modernising educational facilities. The school modernisation and building compliance programs progressively ensure that existing buildings comply with relevant legislative requirements.

    Major works projects (with a value greater than $50,000)

    For details of all major works projects, see the 2021–22 Budget Paper No. 4: State Capital Program.

    A list of all sites that had capital works projects in a construction status during 2021–22 is provided below.

    Major works sites

    Schools [1]

    School

    School

    School

    Ainslie Parklands PS

    Aintree PS

    Aireys Inlet PS

    Aitken Hill PS

    Alamanda K-9 C

    Albanvale PS

    Alexandra PS

    Alexandra SC

    Alfredton PS

    Alkira SC

    Alphington PS

    Altona C

    Altona Green PS

    Altona Meadows PS

    Altona PS

    Anakie PS

    Antonio Park PS

    Apollo Bay P-12 C

    Ardeer PS

    Armadale PS

    Armstrong Creek School

    Arnolds Creek PS

    Ascot Vale Heights School

    Ascot Vale PS

    Ascot Vale West PS

    Ashburton PS

    Aspendale PS

    Athol Rd PS

    Auburn PS

    Auburn South PS

    Avenel PS

    Avoca PS

    Bacchus Marsh C

    Bacchus Marsh PS

    Bairnsdale SC

    Ballarat PS

    Ballarat SS

    Bandiana PS

    Banyule PS

    Baringa SS

    Barton PS

    Barwon Valley School

    Bass Valley PS

    Bayside P-12 C

    Bayside SDS

    Bayswater South PS

    Bayswater West PS

    Beaconsfield Upper PS

    Bealiba PS

    Beaufort ECC

    Beaumaris PS

    Beeac PS

    Beechworth PS

    Belgrave South PS

    Bell Park North PS

    Bell PS

    Bellbrae PS

    Belmont HS

    Belmore S

    Berendale S

    Beulah PS

    Beverford District PS

    Beverley Hills PS

    Big Hill PS

    Black Hill PS

    Black Rock PS

    Blackburn HS

    Blackburn Lake PS

    Bonbeach PS

    Boneo PS

    Boronia West PS

    Box Hill HS

    Briar Hill PS

    Brighton Beach PS

    Broadford PS

    Broadford SC

    Broadmeadows SDS

    Brunswick East PS

    Buangor PS

    Bundarra PS

    Bundoora PS

    California Gully PS

    Camberwell PS

    Cambridge PS

    Camms Road PS

    Campbells Creek PS

    Camperdown C

    Carlisle River PS

    Carlton PS

    Carrington PS

    Carwatha P-12 C

    Casey Fields PS

    Castlemaine North PS

    Castlemaine SC

    Chalcot Lodge PS

    Charles La Trobe P-12 C

    Chatham PS

    Clifton Springs PS

    Clunes PS

    Cobram and District SS

    Coburg HS

    Coburg West PS

    Cockatoo PS

    Coimadai PS

    Colac PS

    Collingwood ELS

    Copperfield C

    Craigieburn PS

    Craigieburn SC

    Cranbourne East PS

    Cranbourne East SC

    Cranbourne Park PS

    Cranbourne PS

    Cranbourne West PS

    Croxton SS

    Croydon Hills PS

    Croydon SDS

    Dallas K

    Dandenong North PS

    Dandenong Valley SDS

    Darnum PS

    Darraweit Guim PS

    Davis Creek PS

    Deanside K

    Dederang PS

    Delacombe PS

    Diamond Creek East PS

    Diamond Valley SDS

    Diggers Rest PS

    Dimboola Memorial SC

    Dingley PS

    Dohertys Creek P-9 C

    Don Valley PS

    Doncaster SC

    Dromana PS

    Dromana SC

    Drouin PS

    Drouin SC

    Drouin West PS K

    Dunolly PS

    Eagle Point PS

    Eaglehawk PS

    Eaglehawk SC

    East Loddon P-12 C

    Eastwood PS and Deaf Facility

    Edenhope C

    Edgars Creek PS

    Edgars Creek SC

    Elevation SC

    Elisabeth Murdoch C

    Elphinstone PS

    Eltham North PS

    Eltham PS

    Emerald SC

    Emerson S

    Eppalock PS

    Epping PS

    Epsom PS

    Eskdale PS

    Essendon East Keilor District C

    Essendon North PS

    Essex Heights PS

    Eucalyptus Parade K

    Euroa PS

    Featherbrook C

    Footscray City PS

    Footscray HS

    Footscray North PS

    Footscray PS

    Foster SC

    Fountain Gate PS

    Fountain Gate SC

    Frankston SDS

    Fyans Park PS

    Gaayip-Yagila PS

    Gardenvale PS

    Garrang Wilam PS

    Gilgai Plains PS

    Gisborne SC

    Glen Huntly PS

    Gleneagles SC

    Glenroy Central PS

    Glenroy West PS

    Greenhills PS

    Grey Street PS

    Halls Gap PS

    Hampden SS & Terang C

    Hampton Park PS

    Harkaway PS

    Harrietville PS

    Hayes Hill PS

    Healesville HS

    Healesville PS

    Heatherwood S

    Heathmont C

    Heathmont East PS

    Hesket PS

    Hoddles Creek PS

    Holy Child K

    Holyoake Parade PS

    Hopetoun P-12 C

    Horsham C

    Huntly PS

    Hurstbridge PS

    Horsham C

    Irymple PS

    Irymple South PS

    Jennings Street S

    Jindivick PS

    John Henry PS

    Kambrya C

    Kangaroo Flat PS

    Kangaroo Ground PS

    Kensington PS

    Kerrimuir PS

    Kew PS

    Keysborough Gardens PS

    Keysborough PS K

    Kiewa Valley PS

    Kilberry Valley PS

    Kinglake PS

    Kinglake West PS

    Kingsbury PS

    Kingsley Park PS

    Kismet Park PS

    Knox Central PS

    Knox Park PS

    Koo Wee Rup PS

    Koroit and District PS

    Korumburra SC

    Kunyung PS

    Kurnai C

    Kyabram P-12 C

    Kyneton HS

    Kyneton PS

    Lalor Gardens PS

    Lalor PS

    Lalor PS K

    Lalor SC

    Lancefield PS

    Landsborough PS

    Lara PS

    Launching Place PS

    Laurimar PS

    Le Page PS

    Lilydale Heights C

    Lilydale HS

    Little Bendigo PS

    Lockwood PS

    Lockwood South PS

    Lollypop Creek PS

    Longwood PS

    Lorne P-12 C

    Lyndale Greens PS

    Lyndale SC

    Lyndhurst PS

    Lyndhurst SC

    Macarthur PS

    Macclesfield PS

    Macedon PS

    Mackellar PS

    MacRobertson Girls HS

    Maffra SC

    Maiden Gully PS

    Mallacoota K

    Manor Lakes P-12 C

    Maribyrnong SC

    Marnebek S

    Maryborough Education Centre

    McClelland SC

    Meadows PS

    Melba SC

    Melrose PS

    Melton SC

    Melton SS

    Melton West PS

    Mentone Park PS

    Merbein P-10 C

    Merino CS

    Mernda Central P-12 C

    Merriang SDS

    Merrifield West Secondary S

    Merrijig PS

    Metung PS

    Mickleham PS

    Middle Park PS

    Middleton Drive K

    Mill Park Heights PS

    Mitta Mitta PS

    Monash SDS

    Monbulk PS

    Moolap PS

    Moomba Park PS

    Mooroolbark East PS

    Mooroopna North PS

    Mordialloc C

    Moreland PS

    Morwell Park PS K

    Mossfiel PS

    Mount Alexander 7-12 C

    Mount Beauty PS

    Mount Beauty SC

    Mount Eliza North PS

    Mount Erin SC

    Mount Ridley P-12 C

    Mount Ridley Special S

    Mount Rowan SC

    Mount View PS

    Mount Waverley Heights PS

    Mount Waverley North PS

    Mount Waverley SC

    Movelle PS K

    Narre Warren South P-12 C

    Newborough PS

    Newbury PS

    Newhaven PS

    Newlands PS

    Nichols Point PS

    Niddrie PS

    Noble Park ELS

    Noble Park SC

    Northcote HS

    Northern Bay P-12 C

    Northern S For Autism

    Northcote HS

    Northern Bay P-12 C

    Norwood SC

    Nowa Nowa PS

    Nullawarre and District PS

    Nullawil PS

    Numurkah PS

    Nungurner PS

    Oakleigh PS K

    Oberon HS

    Ocean Grove PS

    Officer Rix Road PS

    Officer SC

    Officer SS

    Old Orchard PS

    Orchard Grove PS

    Orrvale PS

    Osbornes Flat PS

    Outdoor S

    Oxley PS

    Parkdale PS

    Parkdale SC

    Parktone PS

    Pascoe Vale Girls SC

    Pascoe Vale North PS

    Pascoe Vale PS

    Pender’s Grove PS

    Peninsula Specialist C

    Pentland PS

    Peter Lalor SC

    Pinewood PS

    Plenty Parklands PS

    Point Cook P-9 C

    Portland South PS

    Preston HS

    Preston PS

    Preston South PS

    Puckapunyal PS

    Pyalong PS

    Ramlegh Park PS

    Rangebank PS

    Rangeview PS

    Raywood PS

    Red Cliffs East PS

    Red Cliffs PS

    Red Hill CS

    Reservoir East PS K

    Reservoir PS

    Reservoir West PS

    Riddells Creek PS

    Ringwood Heights PS

    Ringwood North PS

    Ringwood SC

    Riverdale East PS

    Riverwalk PS

    Rockbank Murray Road PS

    Rockbank PS

    Rosamond SS

    Rosebud SC

    Rosedale PS

    Rosehill SC

    Rosewood Downs PS

    Rowville PS

    Rubicon Outdoor S

    Rushworth P-12 C

    Ruskin Park PS

    Sale C

    Saltwater P-9 C

    Sandringham C

    Sassafras PS

    Scoresby SC

    Seabrook PS

    Seaford PS

    Selby PS

    Seville PS

    Shepparton East PS

    Sherbourne PS

    Silvan PS

    Somers PS

    Somerville PS

    South Oakleigh SC

    Southern Autistic S

    Specimen Hill PS

    Springhurst PS

    Springside West SC

    Springvale Park SDS

    St Andrews PS

    St Leonards PS

    Stanhope PS

    Strathewen PS

    Strathmore North PS

    Strathtulloh PS

    Streeton PS

    Sunbury C

    Sunbury Downs C

    Sunbury Heights PS

    Sunbury PS

    Sunshine C

    Sunshine Heights PS

    Surf Coast SC

    Surfside PS

    Surrey Hills PS

    Swan Hill PS

    Sydenham - Hillside PS

    Sydney Road Community S

    Talbot PS

    Talgarno PS

    Tallarook PS

    Taradale PS

    Tarneit Missen House PS

    Tarneit Rise PS

    Tarneit Senior C

    Taylors Lakes SC

    Tecoma PS

    Teesdale PS

    Templestowe Heights PS

    The Basin PS

    Thomastown SC

    Thornbury HS

    Tinternvale PS

    Toolern Vale and District PS

    Tooradin PS

    Torquay Coast PS

    Torquay P-6 C

    Traralgon C

    Traralgon South PS

    Tulliallan PS

    Tylden PS

    Ultima PS

    Undera PS

    University HS

    University Park PS

    Upper Ferntree Gully PS

    Upper Yarra SC

    Upwey PS

    Vermont South Special S

    Verney Road S

    Waaia-Yalca South PS

    Wahgunyah PS

    Wallan PS

    Wallington PS

    Wandong PS

    Wangaratta District SS and Appin Park PS

    Wangaratta West PS

    Wantirna PS

    Warracknabeal Education Precinct

    Warragul Regional C

    Warrandyte PS

    Warringa Park S

    Warrnambool C

    Watsonia PS

    Wedge Park PS

    Wellington SC

    Welshpool and District PS

    Wesburn PS

    Westall PS

    Western Autistic S

    Westmeadows PS

    Wheelers Hill SC

    Williamstown HS

    Williamstown PS

    Winters Flat PS

    Woady Yaloak PS

    Wodonga Middle Years C

    Wodonga PS

    Wollert East SC

    Wollert West PS

    Wonthaggi SC

    Woodford PS

    Woodmans Hill SC

    Woori Yallock PS

    Wycheproof P-12 C

    Wyndham Central SC

    Wyndham Park PS

    Wyndham Vale PS

    Yackandandah PS

    Yarra Hills SC

    Yarra Ranges SDS

    Yarram SC

    Yarraman Oaks PS

    Yarrambat PS

    Yarrawonga P-12 C

    Yinnar PS

    York Street K

    Yuille Park P-8 Community C

    Number of building permits, occupancy permits, or certificates of final inspection issued in relation to buildings owned by the department

    During 2021–22, the department had 303 building permits, 132 occupancy permits, and 158 certificates of final inspection issued.

    Mechanisms for inspection, reporting, scheduling and carrying out of maintenance works on existing buildings

    The department engages compliance program managers to carry out inspections, reporting, scheduling, and rectification works to ensure that existing buildings comply with current building regulations. Compliance programs cover areas such as asbestos removal, fire service upgrades, integration (disability access), environmental works (such as the removal of underground petroleum storage systems) and works aimed at preventing falls.

    The department also operates the Make Safe and Emergency Maintenance programs. The Make Safe program involves works to eliminate the risk of immediate hazards resulting from an incident (fire) or event (storm). The Emergency Maintenance program addresses unforeseen, urgent infrastructure maintenance issues that pose a risk to safety, where schools do not have the financial capacity to rectify the issue.

    Number of emergency orders and building orders issued in relation to buildings

    One emergency order was issued in 2021–22, due to a classroom fire. This building was removed.

    Number of buildings that have been brought into conformity with building standards during the reporting period

    During 2021–22, no buildings were required to be brought into conformity with building standards.


    [1] C: College, CS: Consolidated School, ECC: Early Childhood Centre, ELS: English Language School, HS: High School, K: Kindergarten, PS: Primary School, S: School, SC: Secondary College, SDS: Special Development School, SS: Specialist School

  • The Public Interest Disclosures Act 2012 (PID Act) encourages and assists people to make disclosures of improper conduct by public officers and public bodies. It protects people who make disclosures and establishes a system for investigation and rectification.

    Improper employee conduct is not tolerated, nor are reprisals against those who disclose such conduct. The department ensures transparency and accountability in administrative and management practices and supports disclosures that reveal improper conduct, including corrupt conduct, conduct involving a substantial mismanagement of public resources, or conduct involving a substantial risk to the health and safety of individuals or the environment.

    The department takes all reasonable steps to protect people who make disclosures from reprisals. It also affords natural justice to the person who is the subject of the disclosure to the extent that is legally possible.

    Reporting procedures

    Disclosures of improper conduct or detrimental action by the department or any of its employees, may be made to the department’s:

    • Secretary
    • Public Interest Disclosure Coordinator or public interest disclosure officers
    • manager or supervisor of the discloser
    • manager or supervisor of the person who is the subject of the disclosure.

    Alternatively, disclosures can also be made directly to the Independent Broad-based Anti-Corruption Commission (IBAC):

    Level 1, North Tower, 459 Collins Street
    Melbourne Vic 3000

    Phone : 1300 735 135
    Website : www.ibac.vic.gov.auExternal Link
    Email : See the website above for the secure email disclosure process, which also provides for anonymous disclosures.

    Further information

    The department has published guidelines regarding the procedures it has instituted to comply with the PID Act at www2.education.vic.gov.au/pal/report-fraud-or-corruption/overview External Link

    Disclosures under the Public Interest Disclosure Act

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    2018–19

    The number of disclosures made by an individual to the department and notified to IBAC: assessable disclosures.

    7

    10

    8

    18

  • Competitive neutrality requires government businesses to ensure, where services compete or potentially compete with the private sector, that any advantage arising solely from being government owned is removed if that advantage is not in the public interest. Government businesses must cost and price these services as if they were privately owned.

    The Competitive Neutrality Policy supports fair competition between public and private businesses and helps government businesses make better resource allocation decisions. This policy is focused on efficient service provision and does not override other government policy objectives.

    The department continues to comply with the National Competition Policy. All new legislation and regulations enacted in the portfolio during 2021–22 were subject to a regulatory burden assessment, which included consideration of the National Competition Policy principles as well as competitive neutrality.

  • The Disability Act 2006 reaffirms and strengthens the rights of people with disability and recognises that this requires support across government and community.

    The Disability Act requires that public sector bodies (including all government departments) prepare a disability action plan, and report on its implementation in their Annual Report.

    A disability action plan is a strategy to remove barriers that prevent people with a disability from using the department’s goods, services and facilities, and from gaining and keeping employment. Disability action planning also strives to promote the inclusion and participation of people with disability in the community and achieve changes in attitudes and practices to eliminate discrimination.

    The department’s Disability Action Plan 2018–2021 highlights how the department supports the Victorian Government’s vision of an inclusive Victoria. It outlines the actions taken by the department to support people with a disability to use departmental services and to engage with, or work for, the department. It is aligned to the State Disability Plan: Absolutely Everyone.

    Reducing barriers to accessing goods, services and facilities

    Every year, the department delivers and regulates statewide learning and development services for at least one-third of all Victorians. The department is building an inclusive education system that allows all students to learn and thrive on the same basis as their peers.

    In 2021–22, the department continued its implementation of the almost $1.6 billion Disability Inclusion reform across Victorian government schools. Disability Inclusion is delivering a new strengths-based Disability Inclusion Profile, a new tiered funding model providing more resources to schools to support students with disability, and investment in building skills and knowledge in inclusive education across the school system.

    Reducing barriers to persons with a disability obtaining and maintaining employment

    The department, in conjunction with staff, developed a Disability Employment Plan 2019–22External Link . This plan describes the department’s commitment to boosting employment opportunities and career experiences for people with disability. The plan continues to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for people with disability in the department.

    Promoting inclusion and participation in the community

    The department’s Disability Action Plan 2018–21 identifies priorities and actions to build inclusive education for people with disability across Victoria—in early childhood centres, schools and higher education settings.

    The department also manages a suite of policies and programs to strengthen inclusive education in Victorian government schools, including the Disability Inclusion reforms which will replace the existing Program for Students with Disabilities over a 5-year implementation period between 2021 and 2025. Other programs include the Inclusive Kindergarten Facilities Program, and additional transport, welfare and support services for students and children with disability.

    Achieving tangible changes in attitudes and practices that discriminate against people with a disability

    The department’s disability champion, the Deputy Secretary, PES, continues to champion disability inclusion across the department. A key focus of the role is to raise awareness across the department to ensure accessibility and inclusion. In addition, the Deputy Secretary, FPIS, is the executive sponsor for the department’s Enablers Network. The network is a conduit for staff with lived experience of disability policy and program development.

  • The department ensures that the rights and interests articulated in the Carers Recognition Act 2012 are considered when delivering its services to clients who are in a care relationship. The department has taken all practical measures to comply with its obligations under this Act.

  • The department’s Environment Management System was established to meet government requirements under Financial Reporting Direction (FRD) 24 and to reduce environmental impacts. It allows the department to monitor environmental performance and further reduce environmental impacts of office-based activities.

    In line with government directives, the department reports against a range of indicators for energy and water consumption, transportation, waste generation, paper purchasing, green procurement and greenhouse gas emissions. Consumption and usage are captured through the Energy and Sustainability Platform (ESP) provided by the Shared Services Provider’s (SSP) contractor, Jones Lang LaSalle. This online tool allows reporting across the department’s Victorian offices and the VSA’s offices.

    The environment management system objectives include:

    • reducing greenhouse gas emissions
    • reducing the amount of waste and maximising the amount of reused and recycled resources
    • ensuring that new capital works incorporate environmentally sustainable principles
    • making environmentally sound purchasing decisions for capital items and consumables
    • encouraging staff to reduce environmental impacts
    • regularly reporting on environmental performance
    • adopting an environmental management system based on ISO14001 to drive continual environmental improvement across the department.

    Key updates from last year’s annual reporting

    • New data from one site has been added to the reportable site list through the ESP this year, thus improving efficiency and accountability.
    • To allow precise reporting, 4 sites have been removed from the reportable site list because data has not been available through the ESP.
    • Almost three quarters of the department-owned operational fleet are hybrid vehicles, and the department no longer owns diesel-fuelled vehicles.

    All consumption data is for the period from 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2022, to allow for a full reporting year and to improve accuracy for annual reporting. Variance in consumption for most indicators in 2021–22 can largely be attributed to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and should be considered when reviewing these figures.

    Organisational boundary for the purpose of environmental reporting

    The reportable site list excludes schools, early childhood facilities, and TAFEs. It also excludes office-based locations not in the ESP database and with fewer than 10 FTE. Office staff numbers (FTE) and office tenancy net lettable area details used for reporting calculations are shown in the table below.

    Full-time equivalent staff and net lettable area

    Indicator

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    Office FTE

    5,071.2

    4,667.7

    4,500.8

    Office net lettable area

    73,216.3

    74,775

    74,775

    Number of offices

    32

    35

    35

    In 2021–22 the department’s FTE increased by 8.6% from the previous year.

    Energy usage

    The data below was collected through the ESP. It represents 97% of the department’s office-based locations for electricity and 69% of the department’s office-based locations for gas. The department continues to work with the SSP’s contractor, Jones Lang LaSalle to improve these figures.

    Energy consumption

    Indicator

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    E1. Total energy usage segmented by primary source (MJ)

    27,397,516

    28,866,316

    33,277,172

    Electricity (MJ)—excluding green power

    23,748,592

    22,764,191

    26,434,947

    Natural gas (MJ)

    3,648,924

    6,102,125

    6,842,225

    Green power (MJ)

    LPG (MJ)

    E.2 Total greenhouse gas emissions from energy consumption (tonnes CO2-e)

    6,521

    6,511

    8,601

    Electricity (tonnes CO2-e)—excluding green power

    6,333

    6,197

    8,221

    Natural gas (tonnes CO2-e)

    188

    314

    379

    LPG (tonnes CO2-e)

    E.3 Percentage of electricity purchased as green power (%)

    E.4 Units of office energy used per FTE (MJ/FTE)

    5,715

    6,971

    7,394

    E.5 Units of office energy used per office area (MJ/m2)

    403

    439

    473

    Voluntary/optional indicators

    2 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne (base building and tenancy)

    5.5 stars

    5.0 stars

    4.5 stars

    80 Collins Street, Melbourne (base building)

    4.0 stars

    5.0 stars

    4.5 stars

    35 Collins Street, Melbourne (base building)

    4.5 stars

    4.0 stars

    7-15 McLaren Street, Bendigo (whole building)

    6.0 stars

    6.0 stars

    Actions undertaken

    • Certification was achieved for 6 Star Green Star rating and Gold WELL of Level 3, 35 Collins Street, Melbourne.
    • A new site (Ringwood) has been added to the reporting list that reports electricity consumption.

    Target

    The department will contribute to the state’s target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 levels by 28–33% by 31 March 2025. Department-specific targets are to be confirmed.

    Explanatory notes

    Total energy consumption reduced by 5% from 2020–21. Electricity consumption increased by 4% but natural gas consumption decreased by 40%. The variation in electricity and gas for 2021–22 can be attributed to the intermittency of staff’s presence in offices across Victoria due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The department is continuously looking for opportunities to improve reporting and further reduce energy consumption.

    The data collected through the ESP represents 97% of office accommodation for electricity and 69% of office accommodation for gas. Jones Lang LaSalle (SSP’s contractor) has informed the department that some sites do not have access to gas data. The limitation of not having access to gas data has been considered when calculating the percentage of sites that report natural gas.

    Invoiced and accrued data have been used for this section. Invoiced data accounts for 61% and accrued data accounts for 39% for electricity. For gas, invoiced data accounts for 89% and accrued data accounts for 11%. Generally, sites with accrued data are sites where Jones Lang LaSalle needs to request data directly from the landlord rather than receiving regular invoices from the utility provider.

    Waste and recycling

    The data below was collected through the ESP and represents 59% of its sites across Victoria. The department continues to address waste generation through a variety of re‑use and recycling methods and initiatives.

    Waste and recycling

    Indicator

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    Ws1: Total units of waste disposed of by destination (kg)

    42,050

    94,844

    107,531

    Landfill

    14,175

    21,452

    41,161

    Comingled recycling

    3,667

    5,633

    12,685

    Paper and card

    3,655

    6,277

    15,486

    Secure documents

    16,946

    54,105

    31,987

    Organics

    3,607

    7,378

    6,212

    Ws2: Total units of waste disposed of per FTE by destination (kg/FTE)

    19

    45

    46

    Landfill

    8

    13

    18

    Comingled recycling

    2

    4

    5

    Paper and card

    2

    5

    7

    Secure documents

    5

    17

    14

    Organics

    2

    6

    3

    Ws3: Recycling rate (%)

    58

    77

    62

    Ws4: Greenhouse gas emissions associated with waste disposal (tonnes CO2-e)

    23

    34

    58

    Voluntary/optional indicators

    Recycling services (kg)

    508

    1,318

    Soft plastics recycled (kg)

    1

    Actions undertaken

    • By February 2022, the department phased-out problematic single-use plastics, including straws, cutlery, plates, drink stirrers, expanded polystyrene food and drink containers, and cotton bud sticks within its department offices, in preparation of the statewide ban from February 2023.
    • The department continues to establish 3‑stream (landfill, recycling and organic) waste management practices in all office accommodations (new included).
    • A soft plastics recycling scheme is being trialled on our sites in Level 3 at 35 Collins Street and 2 Treasury Place.
    • The department continues to divert disused recycled office supplies from landfill using recycling services, although it has been strongly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Target

    The department will contribute to the state’s target to halve the volume of organic material going to landfill from 2020 levels by 2030. Department-specific targets are to be confirmed.

    Explanatory notes

    The department continues to share its waste collection points at the Treasury Precinct with other tenants. Each bin collection point serves several organisations making it difficult to accurately measure waste contributed solely by the department. A calculation provided by SSP’s contractor, Jones Lang LaSalle, has been used to calculate waste disposed of at 2 Treasury Place.

    Compared to last year, all streams have had a considerable decrease. Waste directed to landfill decreased by 34%, comingled recycling decreased by 35%, organics decreased by 51%, paper and card decreased by 42% and secure documents decreased by 69%, despite the increase in FTE. The reduction in waste generation for 2021–22 can be attributed to the intermittent presence of staff on sites due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Waste generation would normally be supplemented by the results of a waste audit to a cohort of sites occupied by the department that represent about 30% of FTE. However, the waste audit was not undertaken. Due to the COVID19 pandemic, most office-based staff were working from home and waste audits would not have been representative of normal operating conditions, therefore not providing significant value to the report. The department is looking for further opportunities to improve waste reporting and continue waste reduction.

    Paper

    The data below was collected through the current Victorian Government mandated State Purchase Contract stationery supplier and represents 100% of the department’s (non-school) office sites and 100% of FTE staff.

    Paper purchasing and usage

    Indicator

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    P1: Total units of A4 equivalent copy paper used (reams)

    4,201

    3,799

    27,543

    P2: Units of A4 equivalent copy paper used per FTE (reams/FTE)

    0.8

    0.8

    7

    P3: Percentage of 75–100% recycled content copy paper purchased

    51

    64

    59

    P3: Percentage of 50–74% recycled content copy paper purchased

    P3: Percentage of 0–49% recycled content copy paper purchased

    49

    36

    41

    Voluntary/optional indicators

    Percentage of certified paper used

    100

    Percentage of publications available electronically

    Actions undertaken

    As part of the State Purchase Contract arrangement during 2021–22, there has been a continued focus on redirecting product selection for white A4 copy paper purchases to a 100% recycled product.

    A new departmental corporate printing policy was released in late 2021, giving staff clear requirements on expectations around acceptable printing. FollowMe Print has been rolled out across the department so staff can use their building access pass to securely print documents at any printer. In addition to reducing paper waste, FollowMe Print contributes to improved security, sustainability and workforce mobility.

    Groups and regions were provided with their first paper usage report in February 2022, outlining how printing and mail digitisation practices have changed, compared to pre-pandemic and how groups and regions compare to each other.

    Target

    Updated department-specific targets are to be confirmed.

    Explanatory notes

    Total copy paper usage in 2021–22 saw a slight increase from the 2020–21 period, likely due to staff returning to work in office locations. The target of maintaining less than one ream per FTE has been met, with less than one (0.83) reams of paper being used per FTE.

    Maintaining the target is dependent on department staff maintaining the current reduced levels of copy/printer paper usage when returning to the office. Staff commitment to a ‘paperless office’ strategy and only printing when necessary is key to meeting this target.

    The department is working towards automated printing reporting so that teams can easily track printing and target support to areas that require printing as part of an existing manual process. Printer fleet reduction is underway with redundant printers decommissioned and additional requirements for printers met by reallocation from the existing fleet.

    The proportion of copy paper purchased with the highest recycled content has decreased to 51% in 2021–22, compared to 64% in 2020–21.

    The department will continue to drive higher levels of recycled content purchases in 2022–23 through internal promotion of the revised product selection available under the State Purchase Contract.

    Water

    The data below is based on water meter readings that have been uploaded to the ESP database by Jones Lang LaSalle. Data shows that 72% of the department’s office sites cover about 84% of FTEs.

    Water consumption

    Indicator

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    W1: Total units of metered water consumed by water source (kilolitres)

    11,756

    12,305

    18,723

    W2: Units of metered water consumed in offices per FTE by usage type (kilolitres/FTE)

    2.8

    3.3

    5.7

    W3: Units of metered water consumed in offices per unit of office space (kilolitres per metre squared)

    0.20

    0.20

    0.42

    Voluntary/optional indicators:

    Details of National Australian Built Environment Rating System water rating/s achieved (star rating)

    2 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne (base building and tenancy)

    5.0 stars

    80 Collins Street, Melbourne (base building)

    5.0 stars

    35 Collins Street, Melbourne (base building)

    4.5 stars

    35 Collins Street, Melbourne (Level 3 tenancy)

    6.0 stars

    7–15 McLaren Street, Bendigo (whole building)

    6.0 stars

    Actions undertaken

    The department undertook a refurbishment of the tenancy on Level 3, 35 Collins Street. It is the first department in Victoria to achieve both Gold WELL V2.0 and Green Star 6 ratings for a new fitout.

    Target

    Updated department-specific targets are to be confirmed.

    Explanatory notes

    Total water consumption decreased by 5% compared to last year. Low water consumption for 2021–22 might be attributed to the intermittence of staff’s presence from offices across Victoria, due to the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.

    Some departmental sites share water meters with other non-departmental buildings or with other parts of the organisation that are not corporate. Data for these sites has been calculated based on the percentage of the net lettable area held by the department’s buildings.

    Transportation

    Of the department-owned operational fleet of 371 [1] vehicles:

    • 74.1% are hybrid electric vehicles
    • 25.9% are petrol-fuelled
    • none are diesel-fuelled.

    The data below measures the kilometres, energy consumption and associated emissions for work-related travel by corporate employees, segmented by transport type, excluding public transport. This data includes department-owned fleet and hired vehicles but excludes executive vehicles.

    The data reported below for 2019–20 relates to transport that occurred in the financial year. Data from 2020–21 and going forward relates to the period from 1 April to 31 March, to align transport data with other emissions data in this report.

    Energy consumption of operational vehicles

    Indicator

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    T1: Total energy usage consumption by fleet vehicles (MJ)

    3,734,815

    2,595,797

    10,706,341

    Diesel

    85,975 [2]

    134,889

    308,542

    LPG

    Unleaded

    1,729,991

    1,562,315

    7,718,546

    Hybrid

    1,918,849

    898,593

    2,679,253

    T2: Total distance travelled by fleet vehicles (km)

    1,612,022

    1,249,238

    5,887,186

    Diesel

    17,752

    51,274

    99,970

    LPG

    Unleaded

    613,670

    667,184

    3,890,864

    Hybrid

    980,600

    530,780

    1,896,352

    T3: Total greenhouse gas emissions from fleet vehicles (tonnes CO2-e)

    266

    185

    763

    Diesel

    6

    10

    23

    LPG

    Unleaded

    123

    111

    550

    Hybrid

    137

    64

    191

    T4: Greenhouse gas emissions from fleet vehicles per 1,000km (tonnes CO2-e)

    Diesel

    0.36

    0.19

    0.23

    LPG

    Unleaded

    0.20

    0.13

    0.14

    Hybrid

    0.14

    0.10

    0.10

    Total distance travelled by air (km)

    84,259

    55,910

    2,395,060

    T5: Percentage of staff using sustainable transport to get to and from work by locality

    CBD

    92

    [3]

    Regional

    7

    Voluntary indicators

    Number of petrol hybrid, electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles

    274

    168

    178

    Actions undertaken

    The department leases environmentally friendly operational vehicles, including 4‑cylinder or hybrids, through the Approved Vehicle List from VicFleet, when they are available and suitable for use. The department also uses externally managed pool vehicles where suitable, to minimise fleet expansion.

    Target

    The department will contribute to the state’s target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 levels by 28–33% by 31 March 2025. Department-specific targets are to be confirmed.

    Explanatory notes

    In 2021–22 the department’s vehicle usage continued to be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and associated travel restrictions.

    The extended import timelines experienced by the new car industry due to the COVID‑19 pandemic delayed the department’s transition to a majority hybrid fleet. The department has 161 new vehicles on order, of which 18 are electric (Zero Emission Vehicles), 3 are diesel vehicles and 140 are hybrid, to replace vehicles that have reached the end of their lease terms.

    The data used to calculate the percentage of staff using sustainable transport to get to and from work by locality was collected from the department’s Hybrid Working Survey 2021. In this case, sustainable transport refers to taking public transport only. The department is working to improve the collection of data to accommodate for this section of the Annual Report.

    Greenhouse gas emissions

    The emissions disclosed below are taken from the previous sections and combined to show the department’s greenhouse gas footprint.

    Department emissions

    Indicator

    2021–22

    2020–21

    2019–20

    G1: Total greenhouse gas emissions from energy use (tonnes CO2-e)

    6,521

    6,511

    8,601

    G2: Total greenhouse gas emissions from vehicle fleet (tonnes CO2-e)

    266

    185

    618

    G3: Total greenhouse gas emissions from air travel (tonnes CO2-e)

    17

    10

    577

    G4: Total greenhouse gas emissions from waste disposal (tonnes CO2-e)

    23

    34

    58

    G5: Greenhouse gas emissions offset purchased (tonnes CO 2-e)

    103

    (10)

    (577)

    Voluntary indicators

    Total greenhouse gas emissions from water consumption (tonnes CO2-e) [4]

    16

    14

    23

    Grand total greenhouse gas emissions created by the department

    6,740

    6,744

    9,300

    Actions undertaken

    In 2021–22, the department had a net zero carbon footprint for its corporate travel including air travel, accommodation, and car rental by purchasing 103 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions offset.

    Target

    The department will contribute to the state’s target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 levels by 28–33% by 31 March 2025. Department-specific targets are to be confirmed.

    Explanatory notes

    The increase of total greenhouse gas emissions from energy and water consumption compared to last year – despite having used less energy and water overall – is that the conversion factors are slightly higher this year, compared to last year’s, for both indicators.

    The department’s total greenhouse gas emissions retained a very similar figure compared to last year’s data. These figures can largely be attributed to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic with staff working from home.

    Greener procurement

    The department follows the Social Procurement Framework and is committed to achieving positive environmental outcomes through sustainable procurement practices that achieve value for money, while minimising environmental impacts.

    Infrastructure project tenders are also evaluated against the criteria of their ‘ability to satisfy environmental sustainability requirements’.

    The department continues to promote the purchase of environmentally friendly products, specifically stationery and office products. Business units are encouraged to re-use stationery through the department’s ‘Swap Shop’. The department is working to improve this initiative.


    [1] The total fleet during 2021–22 was 373 vehicles. However, two vehicles were used by VCAA, and have been excluded from the department’s Annual Report. Last year’s figures included a wellbeing vehicle that has been disposed of and not replaced.

    [2] The department reports diesel energy usage for vehicles hired via the SSP. There are no diesel vehicles in the department’s operational fleet.

    [3] Information on staff travel is not available this year, because the department’s travel survey was not completed in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As the majority of staff were working from home the data collected would not be representative of normal staff travel.

    [4] Greenhouse gas emissions from water consumption is calculated using the Environmental Protection Authority methodology and emissions factor for water consumption as stated from section 3.8 Reticulated water, Greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and management plan 2020–21.

Reviewed 21 September 2022

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