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Appendices including disclosure index

Appendices for budget portfolio outcomes, financial information, governance, workforce data, environmental performance and statutory compliance.

Appendix 1: Budget portfolio outcomes

The budget portfolio outcomes provide comparisons between the actual financial information of all general government sector entities in the Department of Premier and Cabinet’s (DPC’s) portfolio and the forecast financial information published in the 2020/21 Budget Paper No. 5: Statement of Finances (BP5).

The budget portfolio outcomes comprise the comprehensive operating statement, balance sheet, cash flow statement, statement of changes in equity and the administered items statement.

The budget portfolio outcomes have been prepared on a consolidated basis and include all general government sector entities in the portfolio. Consistent with the budget papers, financial transactions and balances are classified into either ‘controlled’ or ‘administered’.

The budget portfolio outcomes that follow are not subject to audit by the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office.

They are not prepared on the same basis as DPC’s financial statements because they include the consolidated financial information of the following entities:

  • Labour Hire Authority
  • Portable Long Service Authority
  • Victorian Electoral Commission
  • Victorian Public Sector Commission
  • Cenitex.(1)

Note:

(1) Cenitex transferred into DPC from the Department of Treasury and Finance on 1 August 2020.

Comprehensive operating statement for the year ended 30 June 2021

Controlled

2020–21
actual

$m

2020–21
budget

$m

Variation

$m

Income from transactions

Output appropriations(1)

531.9

663.3

(131.4)

Special appropriations

75.5

82.7

(7.2)

Interest

0.8

0.9

(0.1)

Sale of goods and services(2)

177.6

145.1

32.5

Grants(3)

27.7

4.0

23.7

Other income

119.1

1.4

117.7

Total income from transactions

932.6

897.4

35.2

Expenses from transactions

Employee benefits(4)

372.4

329.1

(43.3)

Depreciation

48.1

41.2

(6.9)

Interest expense

0.6

0.8

0.2

Grants expense(5)

115.0

188.2

73.2

Capital asset charge

11.4

11.2

(0.2)

Other expenses(6)

370.1

326.5

(43.6)

Total expenses from transactions

917.6

897.0

(20.6)

Net result from transactions

15.0

0.4

14.6

Other economic flows included in net result

Net gain/(loss) on non-financial assets

(0.5)

(0.5)

Net gain/(loss) on financial instruments and statutory receivables/payables

6.6

(0.1)

6.7

Other gains/(losses) from other economic flows

5.2

5.2

Total other economic flows included in net result

11.3

(0.1)

11.4

Net result

26.3

0.3

26.0

Other economic flows — other comprehensive income

Items that will not be reclassified to net result

Changes in physical asset revaluation reserve

30.6

30.6

Other(7)

(56.6)

(56.6)

Total other economic flows — other comprehensive income

(26.0)

(26.0)

Comprehensive result

0.3

0.3

0.0

Summary:

The comprehensive result for the DPC portfolio is a surplus of $0.3 million, which is consistent with the budgeted break-even position.

Notes:

The following notes provide an explanation of the major variances between the 2020–21 comprehensive result compared with the budgeted comprehensive result.

(1) Lower output appropriations mainly relate to the machinery of government changes (MoG) where the Fairer Victoria group (equality, multicultural affairs, prevention of family violence, veterans, women’s policy, and youth portfolios) transferred to the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH).

(2) Higher sales of goods and services is due to Cenitex’s services revenue. A budget update was made after the original budget publication to reflect this increase.

(3) The increase in grant revenue mainly relates to additional funding for Cenitex and other trust revenues.

(4) Employee benefits increase mainly relates to Cenitex staff. A subsequent budget update was made to reflect this change.

(5) The decrease in grant expense is due to the transfer of the Fairer Victoria group to DFFH. Fairer Victoria had made the majority of DPC’s grants.

(6) Higher other expenses are due to the timing of budget updates. Further budget adjustments were made for the Portable Long Service Authority’s scheme expenses.

(7) Other items in the comprehensive result relate to the accumulated surplus funds transferred as part of MoG changes.

Balance sheet as at 30 June 2021

Controlled

2021
actual

$m

2021
budget

$m

Variation

$m

Financial assets

Cash and deposits

114.4

117.9

(3.5)

Receivables(1)

171.1

93.0

78.1

Other financial assets(2)

131.3

68.0

63.3

Total financial assets

416.8

278.9

137.9

Non-financial assets

Inventories

3.1

3.7

(0.6)

Property, plant and equipment

753.3

720.2

33.1

Intangible assets

53.7

63.5

(9.8)

Other non-financial assets

34.6

37.4

(2.8)

Total non-financial assets

844.7

824.8

19.9

Total assets

1,261.5

1,103.7

157.8

Liabilities

Payables

87.2

43.9

(43.3)

Borrowings

41.7

40.0

(1.7)

Provisions(3)

217.5

131.7

(85.8)

Total liabilities

346.4

215.6

(130.8)

Net assets

915.1

888.1

27.0

Equity

Contributed capital(4)

428.1

456.4

(28.3)

Reserves

392.2

361.7

30.5

Accumulated surplus

94.8

70.0

24.9

Total equity

915.1

888.1

27.0

Summary:

Net assets (or total equity) for the DPC portfolio at 30 June 2021 is $27 million favourable when compared with the budgeted balance sheet published in BP5. This is mainly attributable to land revaluations.

Notes:

The notes below provide an explanation of the major variances in asset, liability and equity items.

(1) Increase in receivables is due to the timing of expense recoupment from another government department.

(2) Increase in other financial assets is due to investments made by the Portable Long Service Authority.

(3) The variance in provisions is due to the recognition of scheme benefits by the Portable Long Service Authority.

(4) The variance in the contributed capital mainly relates to MoG transfers.

Cash flow statement for the year ended 30 June 2021

Controlled

2020–21
actual

$m

2020–21
budget

$m

Variation

$m

Cash flows from operating activities

Receipts from government(1)

649.1

727.8

(78.7)

Receipts from other entities

55.3

55.4

(0.1)

Other receipts

191.7

144.1

47.7

Total receipts

896.1

927.2

(31.1)

Payments of grants(2)

(115.0)

(188.2)

73.2

Payments to suppliers and employees

(642.4)

(658.9)

16.5

Capital asset charge

(11.4)

(11.2)

(0.2)

Total payments

(768.8)

(858.3)

89.5

Net cash flows from operating activities

127.3

68.9

58.4

Cash flows from investing activities

Net investment(3)

(98.8)

(98.8)

Payments for non-financial assets

(35.3)

(32.7)

(2.7)

Proceeds from the sale of non-financial assets

0.8

0.8

Net cash flows used in investing activities

(133.3)

(32.7)

(100.6)

Cash flows from financing activities

Owner contributions by the state government

70.9

64.2

6.8

Net borrowings(4)

(32.4)

(68.3)

35.9

Net cash flows from financing activities

38.5

(4.1)

42.7

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held

32.5

32.1

0.4

Cash at the beginning of the financial year

81.9

85.8

(3.9)

Cash at the end of the financial year

114.4

117.9

(3.5)

Summary:

The net cash position for the DPC portfolio at 30 June 2021 is $114.4 million. This is $3.5 million lower than the original budgeted balance of $117.9 million.

Notes:

The notes below provide an explanation of the major variances in the 2020–21 cash flow statement.

(1) The variance in receipts from the government is mainly due to transfer of the Fairer Victoria group to DFFH.

(2) Variance in grant payments is also due to the transfer of the Fairer Victoria group to DFFH.

(3) Variance in investments relates to Portable Long Service Authority investment not included in the original budget.

(4) The variance in net borrowings is due to repayment of prior year short-term borrowings for bushfire recovery expense reimbursement.

Statement of changes in equity for the year ended 30 June 2021

Controlled

2020–21
actual

$m

2020–21
budget

$m

Variation

$m

Contributed capital

Opening balance

300.9

300.9

Contribution from owners

127.2

155.5

(28.3)

Closing balance

428.1

456.4

(28.3)

Reserves

Opening balance

361.7

361.7

Comprehensive result

30.5

Closing balance

392.2

361.7

30.5

Accumulated surplus

Opening balance

126.1

126.1

Machinery of government

(56.6)

(56.1)

(0.5)

Comprehensive result

25.3

25.3

Closing balance

94.8

70.0

24.9

Total equity

915.1

888.1

27.0

Summary:

Total equity for the DPC portfolio is $27 million favourable when compared with the original budgeted balance sheet published in BP5. This is mainly attributable to land revaluations.

Administered items statement for the year ended 30 June 2021

2020–21
actual

$m

2020–21
budget

$m

Variation

$m

Administered income

Special appropriations

17.4

12.8

4.6

Sales of goods and services

28.1

33.7

(5.6)

Other income

0.8

0.3

0.5

Total administered income

46.3

46.8

(0.5)

Administered expenses

Expenses on behalf of the State

11.9

6.4

(5.5)

Payments into the Consolidated Fund

22.0

33.9

11.9

Total administered expenses

33.9

40.3

6.4

Income less expenses

12.4

6.5

5.9

Administered assets

Cash and deposits

2.6

2.6

Receivables

31.1

26.0

5.1

Total administered assets

33.7

26.0

7.7

Administered liabilities

Payables

3.3

1.0

(2.3)

Total administered liabilities

3.3

1.0

(2.3)

Net assets

30.4

25.0

5.4

Summary:

Administered items for the DPC portfolio include receipts and payments made by the DPC portfolio on behalf of the state.

Appendix 2: Other financial information

Financial performance

Significant factors that affected DPC’s performance in 2020–21 are summarised below.

DPC recorded a net profit result of $10 million for 2020–21.

The profit result is primarily due to trust funds operation, where funds received during 2020–21 will be expended in future years.

Sources of income ($ million)

Pie graph: Income from government appropriations $607.4 million (94%); Other income $35.4 million (6%)

The above graph shows the sources of income available to DPC during the 2020–21 financial year.

DPC’s main source of income is from government appropriations, which account for 94 per cent of income. The balance is derived from government grants and services.

Compared with 2019–20, the overall decrease in DPC’s income is mainly due to the Fairer Victoria group transferring to DFFH from 1 February 2021 and Bushfire Recovery Victoria transferring to the Department of Justice and Community Safety (DJCS) from 1 July 2020. These transfers resulted in lower government appropriations.

Expenses ($ million)

Pie graph: Employee expenses $238.7 million (26%); Grant expenses $201.1 million (22%); Other $477.7 million (52%)

The above graph shows the distribution of expenses in delivering DPC’s services.

DPC’s total expenses have decreased by $193 million compared with 2019–20. This is again mainly due to the transfer of the Fairer Victoria group to DFFH and Bushfire Recovery Victoria to DJCS.

Financial position — balance sheet

DPC’s assets have increased due to land revaluations. Liabilities have decreased in line with fewer employees and less expenses driven by the Fairer Victoria group and Bushfire Recovery Victoria MoG changes.

Cash flows

DPC had a net cash inflow from operating activities of $36 million. Compared with last year this is an $18 million increase. This increase is mainly due to the timing of receipts from the government.

Capital projects / asset investment

During 2020–21 DPC completed one capital project that met the disclosure threshold of $10 million or greater — security and building upgrades for government buildings (Melbourne) — with a total estimated investment of $13.6 million.

Consultancies and major contracts

Consultancies and major contracts

Details of consultancies

In 2020–21 there were 32 consultancies engaged with a total approved value at $10,000 or greater. The total expenditure incurred during 2020–21 in relation to these consultancies was $5.2 million (excluding GST). Details of individual consultancies can be viewed at www.vic.gov.au/dpc-annual-reportsExternal Link .

Disclosure of major contracts

DPC is required to disclose, in accordance with the requirements of government policy and accompanying guidelines, all contracts greater than $10 million entered into during the financial year.

DPC did not enter into any new contracts greater than $10 million during the financial year ended 30 June 2021. Details of contracts that have been disclosed in the Victorian Government Contracts Publishing System can be viewed at www.tenders.vic.gov.auExternal Link .

Contractual details have not been disclosed for those contracts for which disclosure is exempted under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 or government guidelines.

Direct costs attributable to machinery of government changes

Costs incurred

$’000

Anticipated future costs
(1 July 2021 onwards)

$’000

Consultants and contractors

Relocation

4,000

Telephony

IT and records management

12,065

Rebranding

Redundancies

New staff

Other

15,485

Total

31,550

Grant payments

Details of DPC grant payments in 2020–21 can be viewed at www.vic.gov.au/dpc-annual-reportsExternal Link .

Financial management compliance

Attestation for compliance with Ministerial Standing Direction 5.1.4

Department of Premier and Cabinet

I, Jeremi Moule, the Secretary of the Department of Premier and Cabinet, certify that the Department of Premier and Cabinet has no Material Compliance Deficiency with respect to the applicable Standing Directions under the Financial Management Act 1994 and Instructions.

Jeremi Moule
Secretary
Department of Premier and Cabinet
Melbourne
22 September 2021

Government advertising expenditure

Information and communications technology expenditure

For the 2020–21 reporting period, DPC had a total ICT expenditure of $30.8 million, with details shown below.

Expenditure

$’000

All operational ICT expenditure

Business as usual (BAU) ICT expenditure (total)

19,915

ICT expenditure related to projects to create or enhance ICT capabilities

Operational expenditure

3,682

Capital expenditure

7,212

Non‑business as usual (non‑BAU) ICT expenditure (total)

10,894

ICT expenditure refers to DPC’s costs in providing business-enabling ICT services. It comprises BAU ICT expenditure and non-BAU ICT expenditure. Non-BAU ICT expenditure relates to extending or enhancing DPC’s current ICT capabilities. BAU ICT expenditure is all remaining ICT expenditure, which primarily relates to ongoing activities to operate and maintain the current ICT capability.

Asset management accountability framework maturity assessment

The following sections summarise the department's assessment of maturity against the requirements of the Asset Management Accountability Framework (AMAF).

DPC’s target maturity rating is ‘competence’, meaning systems and processes are fully in place, consistently applied and systematically meeting the AMAF requirement. This includes DPC having a continuous improvement process to expand system performance to ensure our assets are maintained for uninterrupted service delivery.

Diagram showing the department’s compliance with 41 mandatory requirements. Compliance is reported on a scale from 0 to 4, where 0 is defined as innocence, 1 as awareness, 2 as developing, 3 as competence, and 4 as optimising. Ratings of 0-2 as classified as non-comply, and ratings of 3-4 are classified as comply. The department achieved a rating of Comply (all with a score of 3) for 94% of the requirements and a rating of Non-comply (all with a score of 2) for 6% of the requirements.
  • Leadership and accountability (requirements 1–19):
    • DPC has met our target maturity level under most requirements within this category.
    • DPC’s maturity assessment identified some areas that need further improvements to strengthen the application of AMAF requirements across the organisation. These improvement opportunities did not result in any material non-compliances in this category.
  • Planning (requirements 20–23):
    • DPC has met our target maturity level in this category.
  • Acquisition (requirements 24 and 25):
    • DPC has met our target maturity level in this category.
  • Operation (requirements 26–40):
    • DPC has met our target maturity level in this category.
  • Disposal (requirement 41):
    • DPC has met our target maturity level in this category.

Appendix 3: Governance

Board of Management

The Board of Management comprises DPC’s senior-level executive officers who:

  • provide organisation oversight
  • provide strategic direction
  • ensure DPC is operating in a fiscally and environmentally sustainable manner
  • ensure DPC is meeting changing community needs and government priorities.

As of June 2021, DPC’s Board of Management members are:

  • Jeremi Moule, Secretary
  • Toby Hemming, Deputy Secretary, Legal, Legislation and Governance, and General Counsel
  • Vivien Allimonos, Deputy Secretary, Cabinet, Communications and Corporate and A/Chief Executive Officer, Digital Victoria
  • Kate Houghton, Deputy Secretary, Social Policy and Intergovernmental Relations
  • Chris Miller, A/Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy and State Productivity
  • Elly Patira, A/Deputy Secretary, First Peoples–State Relations
  • Matt O’Connor, Deputy Secretary, Industrial Relations Victoria.

Audit and Risk Management Committee

The Audit and Risk Management Committee provides independent assurance and advice on the effectiveness of DPC’s financial management systems and controls, performance, stability, compliance with laws and regulations and risk management.

The committee reports to DPC’s Secretary and is established in accordance with the Financial Management Act 1994.

All members of the committee are independent.

As of 30 June 2021, the committee comprised the following members:

  • Sam Andersen (Chair)
  • Claire Filson
  • Geoff Harry
  • Andrew Whittaker.

Internal audit

In 2020–21 PricewaterhouseCoopers provided DPC’s internal audit services.

DPC’s internal audit program includes reviews into the department’s state of governance, risk management practices and internal controls.

Audit results and follow-up actions are reported to the Audit and Risk Management Committee.

Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee

The Health, Safety and Wellbeing Committee is a consultative committee made up of DPC’s health and safety representatives and may also include first aid officers.

The committee has been established in accordance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004 to:

  • facilitate cooperation between the employer and employees in instigating, developing and carrying out measures designed to ensure the health and safety of employees in the workplace
  • assist formulation, review and dissemination to employees of policies and procedures relating to health and safety that are to be implemented and complied with at DPC
  • investigate any matter that may be a risk to the health and safety of persons at DPC
  • review reported accidents and incidents, and DPC’s Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Risk Register, including risk ratings and controls
  • attempt to resolve any matter or request for DPC to conduct a review of the matter where no resolution can be determined
  • establish designated working groups to reflect the DPC working environment
  • ensure elections are conducted to fulfil the health and safety representative requirement across the department.

The committee members have met monthly during the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure any emerging issues were identified early to enable a timely and proactive response.

Appendix 4: Workforce data

Appendix 5: Environmental performance

DPC maintains a strong focus on sustainability through a range of operational activities and the ongoing management of our workspaces.

DPC continued to commit to the below sustainable practices:

  • environmental considerations in tender specifications for all tender documents
  • three streams of waste disposal: landfill, commingled and organics
  • energy-efficient appliances and sensor lighting
  • sustainably made furniture and, where possible, locally produced furniture
  • sustainable relocation practices, whereby relocating work areas undertake significant clean-up activities and all waste is sustainably disposed of
  • DPC has recycled any usable furniture or equipment to other government departments during refurbishments or relocations
  • development of more digital solutions to reduce paper-based activities.

Office-based environmental impacts

Over the past 12 months, DPC further consolidated our real estate portfolio in the Melbourne central business district, which has enabled the department to further minimise our environmental footprint.

The ongoing effects of COVID-19 has led to a significant reduction in all environmental measures, primarily due to DPC staff working remotely over the past 12 months.

The environmental indicators presented on the following pages are based on Financial Reporting Direction 24D.

Energy

DPC’s energy consumption covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street, 1 Treasury Place, 3 Treasury Place, 1 Spring Street, 121 Exhibition Street, 80 Collins Street and 35 Collins Street. (See the glossary at the end of this section for an explanation of the abbreviations used.)

Electricity

Indicator

2020–21

2019–20

Total energy usage segmented by primary source (MJ)

2,933,289

8,566,888

Greenhouse gas emissions associated with energy use, segmented by primary source and offsets (t CO2 e)

967

2,665

Units of energy used per FTE (MJ/FTE)

3,166

8,431

Units of energy used per unit of office area (MJ/m2)

162

360

Actions undertaken:

DPC has adopted a more efficient footprint through consolidating most staff into 35 Collins Street and releasing the leases for 80 Collins St and 121 Exhibition St tenancies in the last quarter of the financial year.

DPC’s gas consumption covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street, 1 Treasury Place and 3 Treasury Place.

Gas

Indicator

2020–21

2019–20

Total energy usage segmented by primary source (MJ)

619,511

2,526,003

Greenhouse gas emissions associated with energy use, segmented by primary source and offsets (t CO2 e)

34

140

Units of energy used per FTE (MJ/FTE)

668

8,175

Units of energy used per unit of office area (MJ/m2)

91

321

Actions undertaken:

DPC participated in the 2021 Earth Hour event.

Note: Where billing is unavailable, consumption was estimated using average consumption from the previous period. This is the second year that DPC has been able to report our gas usage.

Result

  • Electricity consumption decreased by 65 per cent.
  • Gas consumption decreased by 75 per cent.

Explanatory notes

  • Over the past 12 months, DPC further consolidated our real estate portfolio in the CBD. This, combined with our sustainable practices, has assisted in further reducing our environmental footprint.

Paper

DPC’s paper use covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street, 1 Treasury Place, 3 Treasury Place, 1 Spring Street, 121 Exhibition Street, 80 Collins Street and 35 Collins Street.

Indicator

2020–21

2019–20

Total units of copy paper (reams)

803

7,114

Units of copy paper per FTE (reams/FTE)

0.9

7

Percentage of 75–100% recycled content copy paper purchased (%)

35%

79

Percentage of 0–50% recycled content copy paper purchased (%)

0%

21

Greenhouse gas emissions related to paper use (t CO2 e)

5

31

Result

  • Total units of copy paper (reams) decreased by 89 per cent due to most staff working from home during COVID-19.
  • Total units of copy paper (reams) per FTE decreased by 87 per cent.
  • Some of the decrease can be attributed to the rationalisation of DPC’s offices.

Explanatory notes

  • Data was calculated using purchasing information provided under the whole of government office stationery contract and reflects paper purchased rather than paper consumed.

Water

DPC’s water consumption covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street, 1 Treasury Place, 3 Treasury Place and 35 Collins Street.

Indicator

2020–21

2019–20

Total units of metered water consumed by usage types (kL)

1,923

6,116

Units of metered water consumed in offices per FTE (L/FTE)

2,075

20,387

Units of metered water consumed in offices per unit of office area (L/m2)

147

1,492

Note: Where billing data is unavailable, consumption was estimated using average consumption from the previous period.

Result

  • Water consumption decreased by 68 per cent.
  • Due to the continuing effects of COVID-19 over the past 12 months, we saw further reduction in water usage across our tenancies.

Transport

DPC uses vehicles from the Shared Service Provider vehicle pool for operational car travel.

Operational vehicles

2020–21

2019–20

ULP

Hybrid

DSL

Total

ULP

Hybrid

DSL

Total

Total energy consumption by vehicles (MJ)

34,987

7,798

55,430

98,215

424,183

37,654

153,551

615,388

Total vehicle travel associated with entity operations (km)

34,300

90

2,421

36,811

162,677

25,218

50,452

238,347

Total greenhouse gas emissions from vehicle fleet
(t CO2 e)

2.00

1.00

4.00

7.00

30.00

3.00

11.00

44.00

Greenhouse gas emissions from vehicle fleet per 1,000 km travelled (t CO2 e)

0.13

0.11

0.21

0.45

0.18

0.10

0.32

0.60

2020–21

2019–20

Total distance travelled by aeroplane (km)

42,044

822,600

Total greenhouse gas emissions from air travel (t CO2 e)

0.0

185

Result

  • Total vehicle travel decreased by 84 per cent.
  • Air travel decreased by 94 per cent.
  • The greenhouse gas emissions for air travel is zero.

Explanatory notes

  • The vehicle travel data includes DPC hire car usage from the Shared Service Provider vehicle pool.
  • Air travel data was provided by the state government booking agency.
  • The air travel data for 2020–21 is zero due to carbon offsets purchased through the booking agency as directed by the Department of Treasury and Finance.
  • Staff at 1 Treasury Place, 1 Macarthur Street, 3 Treasury Place, 1 Spring Street and 35 Collins Street were included in the above indicators.

Waste

DPC’s waste reporting covers tenancies at 1 Macarthur Street and 1 Treasury Place.

Waste generation

2020–21

2019–20

Landfill

Co-mingled recycling

Compost

Total

Landfill

Co-mingled recycling

Compost

Total

Total units of waste by destination (kg/year)

11,441

11,413

5,072

27,926

Units of waste per FTE by destination (kg/year)

11.06

11.04

4.90

27.00

Greenhouse gas emissions from waste to landfill (t CO2 e)

19.49

0

0

19.49

Recycling rate (% of total waste)

60

Explanatory notes

Due to COVID-19, DPC was unable to conduct waste audits.

Greenhouse gas emissions

The emissions disclosed in the table below are taken from the previous sections to show DPC’s greenhouse footprint.

Indicator

2020–21

2019–20

Total greenhouse gas emissions associated with energy use (t CO2 e)

947

2,805

Total greenhouse gas emissions associated with vehicle fleet (t CO2 e)

7

44

Total greenhouse gas emissions associated with air travel (t CO2 e)

8

185

Total greenhouse gas emissions associated with waste production (t CO2 e)

0

19

Total greenhouse gas emissions associated with paper use (t CO2 e)

5

0

Total greenhouse gas emissions (t CO2 e)

967

3,053

Green procurement

  • Environmental considerations are included in the specifications for all tender documents.
  • DPC complied with Green Purchasing Guidelines where applicable.

Environmental performance trend charts

DPC annual energy consumption

Line graph - total megajoules (rounded). 2016–17: 10.95 million; 2017–18: 9.61 million; 2018–19: 10.43 million; 2019–20: 8.57 million; 2020–21: 2.93 million.

DPC annual paper use

Line graph - total units (reams) of paper used (rounded). 2015–16: 7,100; 2016–17: 12,700; 2017–18: 10,100; 2018–19: 11,300; 2019–20: 7,100; 2020–21: 800.

DPC annual water use

Line graph - total litres of water used (rounded). 2015–16: 8,800; 2016–17: 7,100; 2017–18: 7,500; 2018–19: 10,300; 2019–20: 6,100; 2020–21: 1,900.

DPC annual car travel

Line graph - total travel (kilometres) associated with entity operation (rounded). 2015–16: 130,000; 2016–17: 197,000; 2017–18: 224,000; 2018–19: 225,000; 2019–20: 238,000; 2020–21: 37,000.

DPC annual waste generation

Line graph - total units of waste (rounded). 2015–16: 49,000; 2016–17: 34,000; 2017–18: 55,000; 2018–19: 28,000; 2019–20: 28,000; 2020–21: 0.

Glossary

  • DSL: diesel
  • FTE: full-time equivalent employee
  • kg: kilogram
  • kL: kilolitre
  • km: kilometre
  • L: litre
  • LPG: liquefied petroleum gas
  • m2: square metre
  • MJ: megajoule
  • ream: 500 sheets of A4 paper
  • t CO2 e: tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent
  • ULP: unleaded petrol

Appendix 6: Statutory compliance and other information

Acts of Parliament

Acts of Parliament administered by the Premier

  • Administrative Arrangements Act 1983
  • Australia (Acts) Request Act 1985
  • Climate Change Act 2017 — sections 7, 8, 10, 14, 16, 41, 42, 50, 54 and 55 (these sections are jointly administered with the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change)
    (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change and the Minister for Solar Homes)
  • Commonwealth Arrangements Act 1958
  • Constitution Act 1975 — except:
    • section 72 (this section is administered by the Minister for Government Services)
    • Part III (this Part is administered by the Attorney-General)
    • Division 1 of Part IIIAA (this Division is jointly administered with the Attorney-General)
    • Divisions 3 to 6 of Part IIIAA (these Divisions are administered by the Attorney-General)
    • section 88 in so far as it relates to the appointment of Crown Counsel and Crown Counsel (Advisings) (this section is administered by the Attorney-General)
    • section 88 in so far as it relates to the appointment of the Commissioner for Better Regulation (this section is administered by the Minister for Regulatory Reform)
    • section 88 in so far as it relates to the appointment of the Victorian Skills Commissioner (this section is administered by the Minister for Training and Skills)
  • Constitution (Appointments) Act 2009
  • COVID-19 Omnibus (Emergency Measures) Act 2020 — except:
    • Part 2.1 (this Part is jointly and severally administered by the Attorney-General, the Minister for Corrections, the Minister for Police and Emergency Services, the Minister for Victim Support and the Minister for Youth Justice)
    • Part 2.2 (except section 16) (this Part is administered by the Minister for Small Business)
    • section 16 (this section is administered by the Minister for Industry Support and Recovery)
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into an Act by Chapter 3 before the repeal of Chapter 3 (in so far as it does relate to those matters, this Part is jointly and severally administered by the Attorney-General, the Minister for Corrections, the Minister for Police and Emergency Services, the Minister for Victim Support and the Minister for Youth Justice)
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into an Act by Chapter 4 before the repeal of Chapter 4 (in so far as it does relate to those matters, this Part is jointly and severally administered by the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Gaming and Liquor Regulation, the Minister for Disability, Ageing and Carers and the Minister for Housing)
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into the Education and Training Reform Act 2006 by Part 5.1 before the repeal of Part 5.1 (in so far as it does relate to those matters, this Part is jointly and severally administered by the Minister for Early Childhood, the Minister for Education and the Minister for Training and Skills)
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into an Act by Part 5.2 before the repeal of Part 5.2 (in so far as it does relate to those matters, this Part is administered by the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change)
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into an Act by Part 5.3 before the repeal of Part 5.3 (in so far as it does relate to those matters, this Part is administered by the Minister for Local Government)
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into an Act by Part 5.5 before the repeal of Part 5.5 (this Part is administered by the Minister for Planning, except in so far as this Part relates to decisions relating to the activities or interests of the Director of Housing or the Minister for Housing [in so far as it does relate to those matters, these provisions are jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change])
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into an Act by Part 5.6 before the repeal of Part 5.6 (in so far as it does relate to those matters, this Part is administered by the Minister for Health)
    • Part 6.1 in so far as it relates to the making of regulations relating to the repeal of provisions inserted into an Act by Part 5.7 before the repeal of Part 5.7 (in so far as it does relate to those matters, this Part is administered by the Minister for Workplace Safety)
  • Crown Land (Reserves) Act 1978 —
    • in so far as it relates to the land shown as Crown Allotment 2036, City of Melbourne, Parish of Melbourne South (Parish Plan No. 5514D) reserved for Public Purposes (Government House and Grounds)
      (The Act is otherwise administered by the Assistant Treasurer, the Minister for Business Precincts, the Minister for Corrections, the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change, the Minister for Health, the Minister for Ports and Freight and the Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events)
  • Electoral Act 2002 — Division 1 of Part 5 and Part 9A
    (The Act is otherwise administered by the Attorney-General and the Minister for Government Services)
  • Essential Services Act 1958
  • Family Violence Reform Implementation Monitor Act 2016
  • Inquiries Act 2014
  • Melbourne Cricket Ground Act 2009
    (The Act is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Business Precincts and the Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events)
  • Melbourne and Olympic Parks Act 1985
    (The Act is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Business Precincts and the Minister for Tourism, Sport and Major Events — except:
    • sections 24–28 [these sections are administered by the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change])
  • Ombudsman Act 1973 — sections 3–6
    (The Act is otherwise administered by the Attorney-General)
  • Parliamentary Administration Act 2005
    • Part 2 and sections 14–17
    • Part 5 (this Part is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Government Services)
      (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Parliamentary Committees Act 2003 — except:
    • sections 7, 7A and 52 (in so far as these sections relate to public interest disclosures about conduct by or in the Victorian Inspectorate [these sections are jointly and severally administered with the Attorney-General])
  • Project Development and Construction Management Act 1994 — except:
    • section 11 in so far as it relates to a project nominated under section 6 for which the Secretary referred to in Part 5A is the facilitating agency (in so far as it relates to those matters, this section is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Business Precincts and the Minister for Transport Infrastructure)
    • Part 4 (this Part is administered by the Assistant Treasurer)
    • Part 5A (this Part is jointly and severally administered by the Minister for Business Precincts and the Minister for Transport Infrastructure, except to the extent that it relates to the exercise of powers and functions under Part 9A of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, in so far as it relates to those powers and functions this Part is administered by the Minister for Planning)
    • section 46 (this section is administered by the Minister for Planning)
    • Part 7 (this Part is administered by the Minister for Planning)
    • Parts 8, 9 and 10 (these Parts are jointly and severally administered by the Minister for Business Precincts and the Minister for Transport Infrastructure)
  • Public Administration Act 2004
    • Parts 1, 2 and 8, section 67(3)(d) and Divisions 2 and 3 of Part 6 (these provisions are jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Government Services)
    • Part 3
    • Part 5A
    • sections 66(3), 98–98A
    • Part 7A
      (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Public Records Act 1973 — in so far as the Act relates to public records in the possession of, transferred from or to be transferred from the Cabinet Office
    (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Public Safety Preservation Act 1958
  • Public Sector (Union Fees) Act 1992
  • Senate Elections Act 1958
  • Statute Law Revision Acts
  • Subordinate Legislation Act 1994 — sections 5A, 9 and 12G
    (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Government Services)
  • Succession to the Crown (Request) Act 2013
  • Superannuation (Public Sector) Act 1992
  • Vital State Industries (Works and Services) Act 1992
  • Vital State Projects Act 1976 — except:
    • sections 5–16 (these sections are administered by the Attorney-General)
  • Wrongs (Public Contracts) Act 1981

Acts of Parliament administered by the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs

  • Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act 2018
  • Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006
  • Aboriginal Lands Act 1970
  • Aboriginal Lands Act 1991, which is jointly and severally administered with the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change

Acts of Parliament administered by the Minister for Industrial Relations

  • Child Employment Act 2003
  • Construction Industry Long Service Leave Act 1997
  • Fair Work (Commonwealth Powers) Act 2009
  • Labour Hire Licensing Act 2018
  • Long Service Leave Act 2018
  • Long Service Benefits Portability Act 2018
  • Outworkers (Improved Protection) Act 2003
  • Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Act 2005
  • Public Sector Employment (Award Entitlements) Act 2006
  • Trade Unions Act 1958
  • Wage Theft Act 2020

Acts of Parliament administered by the Minister for Government Services

  • Constitution Act 1975, section 72
    (The Act is otherwise administered by the Attorney-General, [the Minister for Regulatory Reform], the Minister for Training and Skills, the Treasurer and the Premier)
  • Electoral Act 2002 — except:
    • Division 1 of Part 5 and Part 9A, which are administered by the Premier and Part 8, which is administered by the Attorney-General
  • Electoral Boundaries Commission Act 1982
  • Land Act 1958, subdivisions 1 and 2 of Division 9 of Part 1, in so far as they relate to the exercise of powers in respect of the land described as Crown Allotment 13A of section 92 at North Melbourne in the Parish of Jika, being the site of the Public Record Office Victoria; the Act is otherwise administered by the Assistant Treasurer, the Attorney-General, the Minister for Corrections, the Minister for Creative Industries, the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change, the Minister for Health, the Minister for Ports and Freight and the Minister for Roads and Road Safety
  • Members of Parliament (Standards) Act 1978
  • Parliamentary Administration Act 2005 — except:
    • Part 2 and sections 14–17 (these provisions are administered by the Premier)
    • and Part 5 (Part 5 is jointly and severally administered with the Premier)
  • Parliamentary Precincts Act 2001
  • Parliamentary Salaries and Superannuation Act 1968 — except: sections 6(6), 9K(3), 9K(5), 9L and Part 3, which are administered by the Assistant Treasurer
  • Public Administration Act 2004 — except:
    • Parts 1, 2 and 8, section 67(3)(d) and Divisions 2 and 3 of Part 6 (these provisions are jointly and severally administered with the Premier)
    • Part 3 (this Part is administered by the Premier)
    • Part 5A (this Part is administered by the Premier)
    • sections 66(3), 98, 98A (these sections are administered by the Premier)
    • Part 7A (this Part is administered by the Premier)
  • Public Records Act 1973 — except:
    • in so far as the Act relates to public records in the possession of, transferred from or to be transferred from the Cabinet Office (in so far as the Act relates to those matters, the Act is administered by the Premier)
  • Service Victoria Act 2018
  • State Owned Enterprises Act 1992 —Division 2 of Part 2 in so far as it relates to Cenitex
    (The Act is otherwise administered by the Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change, the Minister for Multicultural Affairs, the Minister for Water and the Treasurer)
  • Subordinate Legislation Act 1994 — except:
    • sections 5A, 9 and 12G (these sections are administered by the Premier)
  • Victorian Data Sharing Act 2017
  • Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal and Improving Parliamentary Standards Act 2019.

Aboriginal Heritage Act

Compliance with the Aboriginal Heritage Act

Under section 192 of the Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006, the Secretary must report on the operation of the Act including:

  • the exercise and performance by authorised officers of their powers, functions and duties under the Act
  • any complaints received in relation to authorised officers
  • actions taken to address those complaints.

The Act establishes the role of authorised officers and makes provision for appointing authorised officers. The key functions to be carried out by an authorised officer include:

  • monitoring compliance with the Act
  • investigating suspected offences against the Act
  • directing the conduct of a cultural heritage audit to assess the impact of an activity on Aboriginal cultural heritage
  • issuing and delivering stop orders without formal approval if there are reasonable grounds for believing that Aboriginal cultural heritage is under threat from an activity.

On 30 June 2021:

  • 27 authorised officers, all DPC employees, are appointed under the Act
  • 13 Aboriginal heritage officers, all employees of a registered Aboriginal party, are also appointed under the Act.

All appointees have successfully completed a Certificate IV in Government Investigations within the past five years and receive ongoing training about the operation of the Act.

There were no complaints made about authorised officers during this period.

In 2020–21 authorised officers exercised their powers, functions and duties as set out on the following page.

Information on the exercise and performance by authorised officers of their powers, functions and duties under the Aboriginal Heritage Act

Section

Function/power

Exercised

83

Cultural heritage audit must be conducted under the direction of an authorised officer

No cultural heritage audits were conducted

84

Give a written report of the findings of a cultural heritage audit to the minister

No written reports were provided to the minister

159(a)

Monitor compliance with the Act

No inspections were carried out to monitor compliance — they were recorded as investigations of suspected offences

159(b)

Investigate suspected offences against the Act

118 investigations were carried out or are ongoing

159(c)

Direct the conduct of cultural heritage audits

No cultural heritage audits were ordered

159(d)

Issue and deliver stop orders

Two stop orders were issued or delivered

159(e)

Report to the Secretary

Three reports were required

165

Present identification card for inspection

Identification cards were presented for inspection on 22 occasions

166

Enter land or premises with the consent of the occupier

General powers to enter land or premises were used 22 times

167

Obtain consent to enter land or premises

Land or premises were entered 22 times with the consent of the occupier

168

Enter land or premises open to the public

Land or premises open to the public were entered 11 times

169

Enter land or premises for a cultural heritage audit

No land was entered for the purposes of a cultural heritage audit

170

Search upon entry

Search powers on entering land were not required

171

Seizure powers on entry without search warrant

Seizure powers were required on one occasion

172

Seizure power without consent

Seizure powers without consent were not required

173

Search warrants

One search warrant was obtained

176

Receipts for seized things

Two receipts were issued

177

Security of seized things

Two seized things (records) were required to be secured

178(4)

Return of seized objects

No seized things were required to be returned

180

Require the giving of name and address

No one was required to give their name and address

181

Require the giving of assistance and information

No one was required to provide assistance or information

182

Take affidavits

No affidavits were taken

184

Report to be given about entry

No reports were required

Full details of all powers and functions exercised by authorised officers in previous years can be requested via email to the Director, Heritage Services, First Peoples–State Relations at aboriginal.heritage@dpc.vic.gov.au .

Building Act

Compliance with the Building Act

DPC complied with obligations under the Building Act 1993, the Building Regulations 2006 and associated statutory requirements and amendments. An occupancy permit or certificate of final inspection endorsed by a registered building surveyor is obtained for all upgrades to existing facilities requiring a permit. Design consultants and building contractors engaged are registered practitioners and registrations are maintained during the course of the work.

DPC manages the Victorian Archives Centre and Government House and its outbuildings. There are several mechanisms for inspection, reporting and carrying out of maintenance works at these two sites including:

  • regular property inspections conducted by staff, tenants and external contractors
  • independent, formal condition audits undertaken every five years
  • site risk surveys undertaken at least biennially by the Victorian Managed Insurance Authority
  • onsite facilities managers responding to and prioritising identified issues and managing breakdown, preventative and cyclical maintenance contracts.
Major works projects (greater than $50,000)

99 Shiel Street,
North Melbourne

  • Upgrade of fire indicator panels
  • Upgrade of building maintenance system controllers
  • Replacement of CCTV cameras at the Victorian Archive Centre

Government House Drive, Melbourne

  • Conservation works including the final stage of the roof replacement project

Carers Recognition Act

Compliance with the Carers Recognition Act

DPC acknowledges and values the contribution that carers make to both the workplace and to the broader community and their families. DPC is committed to creating a workplace where greater flexibility is supported in the way we work in the future. By working flexibly and in a hybrid manner our people have reported greater flexibility in managing work and life commitments. DPC has taken active steps to support our people with their caring responsibilities under the Carers Recognition Act 2012. This encompasses:

  • ensuring flexible work arrangements are embedded as part of the DPC working culture (in line with requirements under the Gender Equality Act 2020) and are available to all staff for any reason including supporting employees with family and caring responsibilities. During 2020–21 the VPS introduced a new Flexible Work Policy to support the way VPS organisations will work in the future
  • embedding a hybrid working model to support diversity, inclusion and a more equitable workplace
  • championing the DPC Enablers Network, a network run by people with disability for people with disability, with an executive sponsor, open to all staff including carers
  • delivering a mental health and wellbeing training program for all staff and leaders including those who have caring responsibilities
  • using qualified psychologists, delivering a range of webinars about wellbeing and working remotely during COVID-19 for all staff including those who have caring responsibilities
  • providing support to all staff through the Peer Support Program and the Employee Assistance Program.

Gender Equality Act

Compliance with the Gender Equality Act

DPC acknowledges gender diversity within our workforce and is committed to developing strategies that promote opportunities for all staff.

DPC’s obligation under the Gender Equality Act 2020 commenced on 31 March 2020 and requires defined entities including the public sector, local councils and universities to take positive action towards achieving workplace gender equality.

Under the Act DPC is required to:

  • develop and implement a Gender Equality Action Plan, including results of a workplace gender audit and strategies for achieving workplace gender equality
  • promote gender equality in policies, programs and services that affect the public
  • complete gender impact assessments
  • publicly report on our progress in relation to workplace gender equality.

The Act also requires defined entities to consider intersectionality when developing strategies and measures to promote gender equality in the workplace.

Competitive Neutrality Policy

Competitive neutrality requires government businesses to ensure that, where services compete or potentially compete with the private sector, any advantage arising solely from their government ownership be removed if it is not in the public interest. Government businesses are required to cost these services as if they were privately owned. The Competitive Neutrality Policy supports fair competition between public and private businesses and provides government businesses with a tool to enhance decisions on resource allocation. This policy does not override other policy objectives of government and focuses on efficiency in service provision.

DPC continues to ensure Victoria fulfils its requirements on competitive neutrality reporting for government businesses against the enhanced principles as required under the Competition Principles Agreement.

Open Data Policy

In 2020–21 DPC continued our review of the DataVic Access Policy following extensive public service and citizen consultation and we are now finalising that work and seeking appropriate authorisation. The updated Open Data Policy (2021) replaces the previous Data Vic Access Policy (2012) and refreshes the Victorian Government’s practice of safely releasing government data to the public for free, unfettered reuse. The new policy covers the reasons, principles and outcomes expected from strengthening the Open Data Program. It updates the previous policy position to incorporate advances in data science, the Victorian Government’s IT reforms and sophistication in data usage. This policy, and its associated user guidelines, focuses on how the VPS can improve its open data supply through better application of existing information management policies and procedures.

The Victorian Government’s open data portal ( data.vic.gov.auExternal Link ) is the central service for discovering, accessing and interacting with the Open Data Program. VPS agencies publish their data assets through the service, providing opportunities for citizens to search, discover and connect with Victorian Government data. In 2020–21 the portal saw the highest number of sessions on record (432,729 sessions), up from 234,378 sessions in the previous year. This increased activity on the data.vic website was driven almost entirely by the demand for COVID-19-related data. On 26 August 2020 Victoria began publishing frequently updated releases of Victorian COVID-19 open data, which has since been downloaded more than 300,000 times and accessed via the DataVic portal for data visualisations on the Department of Health coronavirus website plus citizen initiatives such as covidlive.com.au External Link and covid19nearme.com.auExternal Link .

Disability Act

Compliance with the Disability Act

DPC’s next Disability Action Plan will be launched in 2021–22. The plan will continue to provide a framework for DPC to ensure equitable access to employment opportunities for people with disability.

Highlights under the Disability Act 2006 during 2020–21 included the following:

  • DPC hosted the VPS Enablers Network for the third year. The Enablers Network is run by employees with disability and their allies. This role has been transitioned to the Department of Transport in 2021–22.
  • DPC also hosts the department-level Enablers Network for people with disability, representing the needs, interests and concerns of government employees with lived experience of disability to ensure fair and equitable treatment. The network is now supported by a newly appointed Executive champion.
  • DPC appointed a dedicated Senior Adviser Disability Access and Inclusion.
  • DPC continued our partnership with the Australian Network on Disability (AND). AND is a national, membership-based, for-purpose organisation that supports organisations to advance inclusion for people with disability.

Freedom of Information Act

Compliance with the Freedom of Information Act

The Freedom of Information Act 1982 gives members of the public a right to access documents held by DPC. The purpose of the Act is to extend as far as possible the right of the community to access information held by government departments, local councils, ministers and other bodies subject to the Act.

An applicant has a right to apply for access to any document held by DPC, which comprises documents both created and received by DPC. Other than regular electronic and paper records, applicants may also request access to documents such as maps, films, computer discs and tape recordings.

The Act allows DPC to refuse access, either fully or partially, to certain documents or information. Examples of documents that may not be accessed include Cabinet documents; certain internal working documents; law enforcement documents; documents covered by legal professional privilege; documents containing personal information; documents containing certain commercial and financial information; and information provided to DPC in confidence.

If an applicant is not satisfied with a freedom of information (FOI) decision made by DPC, under section 49A of the Act they have the right to seek a review from the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner within 28 days of receiving a decision letter.

For the 12 months ended 30 June 2021, the FOI Unit received 112 requests for DPC documents and 21 for the Office of the Premier.

No requests were received during this period for any other DPC portfolio ministers.

The department finalised 92 FOI requests to DPC during the 12 months ending 30 June 2021. Forty-two per cent of access decisions were made within the statutory time period, 15 per cent were between one and 45 days overdue and 42 per cent were overdue by more than 45 days. DPC also finalised 18 requests for the Office of the Premier.

Ten DPC matters went to the Information Commissioner for review and 19 complaints about DPC matters were made to the Information Commissioner.

Ten DPC matters were appealed to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

Three complaints about Office of the Premier matters were made to the Information Commissioner.

Making a request

Requests to access documents should be made in writing to DPC’s FOI officer. The requirements of a request are set out in section 17 of the FOI Act.

In summary, a request should:

  • be in writing
  • identify as clearly as possible the documents requested
  • be accompanied by the appropriate application fee (which may be waived if it would cause hardship to the applicant).

Requests for documents in DPC’s possession should be addressed to:

Freedom of Information Officer
Department of Premier and Cabinet
GPO Box 4912
Melbourne 3001

Requests can also be lodged via https://online.foi.vic.gov.auExternal Link . Access charges may apply once documents have been processed and an access decision has been made.

Charges may be applied — for example, for costs associated with photocopying and for search and retrieval of documents. More information about DPC’s FOI arrangements can be found at www.vic.gov.au/foi-part-ii-statementsExternal Link .

Local Jobs First Act

Compliance with the Local Jobs First Act

The Local Jobs First Act 2003, introduced in August 2018, brings together the Victorian Industry Participation Policy (VIPP) and the Major Project Skills Guarantee (MPSG) policy, which were previously administered separately.

Departments and public sector bodies are required to apply the Local Jobs First policy in all projects valued at $3 million or more for metropolitan Melbourne or statewide projects, or $1 million or more for projects in regional Victoria.

MPSG applies to all construction projects valued at $20 million or more. The MPSG guidelines and VIPP guidelines will continue to apply to MPSG-applicable and VIPP-applicable projects respectively where contracts have been entered prior to 15 August 2018.

During 2020–21 DPC had two Local Jobs First Standard projects valued at $8.9 million under contract, carried across from previous financial years. The projects were in metropolitan Victoria. No projects began in regional Melbourne or were deemed as statewide. The MPSG did not apply to this project. Of the two Local Jobs First projects in progress, the expected outcomes are:

  • an average of 98 per cent of local content commitment
  • the retention of one job (annualised employee equivalent).

Public Interest Disclosure Act

The Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012 (formerly the Protected Disclosure Act 2012) encourages and assists people to disclose improper conduct or detrimental action involving public officers and public bodies. The Act provides protection to people who make disclosures in accordance with the Act and establishes a system for the matters disclosed to be investigated.

DPC is committed to the Act’s objectives. DPC does not tolerate improper conduct by our employees or reprisals against those who make disclosures about such conduct.

Compliance with the Public Interest Disclosure Act

The Guide to Making and Handling Public Interest Disclosures, which outlines the system for reporting disclosures of improper conduct or detrimental action by DPC or any of our employees or officers, is available on the internet at www.vic.gov.au/dpc-public-interest-disclosuresExternal Link .

Public interest disclosures must remain confidential under the law, so it is difficult to be accurate about the number of disclosures in any year. For example, managers or executives can receive public interest disclosures and may report these straight to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission (IBAC) without anyone knowing. Equally, people can report directly to IBAC themselves without DPC necessarily knowing.

There have been three disclosures made to DPC under the Public Interest Disclosures Actand notified to IBAC in 2020–21.

Social Procurement Framework

During 2020–21 DPC launched the Social Procurement Strategy, which was developed in line with Victoria’s Social Procurement Framework.

In 2020–21 DPC improved our social procurement performance against four objectives:

  • opportunities for Victorian Aboriginal people
  • opportunities for Victorians with disability and disadvantaged Victorians
  • supporting safe and fair workplaces
  • opportunities for Victorian social enterprises.

Purchases from social suppliers, 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021

Social procurement opportunity

Metric

Number of businesses engaged

Actual spend
(excl. GST)

Opportunities for Victorian Aboriginal people

Total spend with Victorian Aboriginal businesses

$478,813.28

Number of Victorian Aboriginal businesses engaged

31

Opportunities for Victorians with disability

Total spend with Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for people with disability and Australian Disability Enterprises

$5,959.50

Number of Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for people with disability and Australian Disability Enterprises engaged

5

Opportunities for disadvantaged Victorians

Total spend with Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for the disadvantaged

$365,325.20

Number of Victorian social enterprises led by a mission for the disadvantaged engaged

11

Sustainable Victorian social enterprises and Aboriginal business sectors

Total spend with Victorian social enterprises

$1,791,388.14

Number of Victorian social enterprises engaged

38

Summary of contributing activities and initiatives

  • DPC renegotiated the Oracle State Purchase Contract and included a key performance indicator for Oracle’s Women in Leadership program to host at least two events yearly in Australia, including one in Melbourne, to empower women to reach their leadership potential.
  • DPC is working on several upcoming projects with embedded social procurement commitments. This involves asking suppliers for measurable social and sustainable outcomes; requesting regular reporting and commitments to hard targets under the head agreements; improving system functionality for buyers to easily identify social enterprises; proactive outreach to social enterprises to inform them of these head agreements; and providing dedicated assistance to them during the onboarding process.
  • Invitations to supply during the financial year included requirements for a minimum of one social procurement objective to be included in supplier proposals. As a result, DPC awarded contracts to the value of $30,310,544 to suppliers who provided a social benefit.
  • Through refined procurement and business processes DPC continued to encourage direct spend with Aboriginal suppliers where Aboriginal knowledge and expertise is needed.
  • DPC procured a range of services from several Victorian Aboriginal businesses in 2020–21, including professional advisory services and strategic research to inform policy advice.
  • DPC’s ‘Stay Engaged’ program continued during 2020–21. The program gives people with disability a chance to engage in meaningful employment within DPC through fixed-term paid work placements offered in various areas such as administration and policy.
  • All suppliers engaged via a competitive procurement process with DPC have committed to the Victorian Government Supplier Code of Conduct by signing a commitment letter prior to the engagement.

Subsequent events

Refer to the section on subsequent events at Note 8.10 in DPC’s financial statements.

Other information available on request

In compliance with the requirements of the Standing Directions of the Assistant Treasurer, details of items listed below have been retained by DPC and are available on request, subject to the provisions of the FOI Act. These items include:

a) a statement that declarations of pecuniary interests have been duly completed by all relevant DPC officers

b) details of shares held by a senior officer as nominee or held beneficially in a statutory authority or subsidiary

c) details of publications produced by DPC about itself and how these can be obtained

d) details of changes in prices, fees, charges, rates and levies charged by DPC

e) details of any major external reviews carried out on DPC

f) details of major research and development activities undertaken by DPC

g) details of overseas visits undertaken, including a summary of the objectives and outcomes of each visit

h) details of major promotional, public relations and marketing activities undertaken by DPC to develop community awareness of DPC and our services

i) details of assessments and measures undertaken to improve the occupational health and safety of employees

j) a general statement on industrial relations within DPC and details of time lost through industrial accidents and disputes

k) a list of major committees sponsored by DPC, the purposes of each committee and the extent to which the purposes have been achieved

l) details of all consultancies and contractors including:

  • consultants/contractors engaged
  • services provided
  • expenditure committed to for each engagement.

This information is available on request from:

Director
Corporate Governance
Department of Premier and Cabinet
1 Treasury Place
East Melbourne 3002
Email: dp&c@dpc.vic.gov.au

Disclosure index

The Department of Premier and Cabinet’s annual report is prepared in accordance with all relevant Victorian legislation and pronouncements. This index has been prepared to help identify the department’s compliance with statutory disclosure requirements.

Legislation

Requirement

Page

Standing Directions and Financial Reporting Directions (FRDs)

Report of operations

Charter and purpose

FRD 22I

Manner of establishment and the relevant ministers

6–10

FRD 22I

Purpose, functions, powers and duties

1, 12–17

FRD 8D

Departmental objectives, indicators and outputs

20–42

FRD 22I

Key initiatives and projects

21–42

FRD 22I

Nature and range of services provided

12–17

Management and structure

FRD 22I

Organisational structure

11

Financial and other information

FRD 8D

Performance against output performance measures

43–57

FRD 8D

Budget portfolio outcomes

112–118

FRD 10A

Disclosure index

160–161

FRD 12B

Disclosure of major contracts

120

FRD 15E

Executive officer disclosures

133–134

FRD 22I

Employment and conduct principles

135

FRD 22I

Occupational health and safety policy

137–140

FRD 22I

Summary of the financial results for the year

119

FRD 22I

Significant changes in financial position during the year

119

FRD 22I

Major changes or factors affecting performance

119

FRD 22I

Subsequent events

159

FRD 22I

Application and operation of the Freedom of Information Act 1982

155

FRD 22I

Compliance with building and maintenance provisions of the Building Act 1993

153

FRD 22I

Statement on National Competition Policy

154

FRD 22I

Application and operation of the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012

157

FRD 22I

Application and operation of the Carers Recognition Act 2012

153

FRD 22I

Details of consultancies over $10,000

120

FRD 22I

Details of consultancies under $10,000

n/a

FRD 22I

Disclosure of government advertising expenditure

122

FRD 22I

Disclosure of ICT expenditure

123

FRD 22I

Statement of availability of other information

159

FRD 24D

Reporting of office-based environmental impacts

141–146

FRD 25D

Local Jobs First

156

FRD 29C

Workforce data disclosures

127–136

SD 5.2

Specific requirements under Standing Direction 5.2

107

Compliance attestation and declaration

SD 5.2.3

Declaration in report of operations

1

SD 5.4.1

Attestation for compliance with Ministerial Standing Direction

121

Financial statements

Declaration

SD 5.2.2

Declaration in financial statements

107

Other requirements under Standing Directions 5.2

SD 5.2.1(a)

Compliance with Australian Accounting Standards and other authoritative pronouncements

104–105

SD 5.2.1(a)

Compliance with Standing Directions

107

SD 5.2.1(b)

Compliance with Model Financial Report

107

Other disclosures as required by FRDs in notes to the financial statements

FRD 9B

Departmental disclosure of administered assets and liabilities by activity

73–75

FRD 11A

Disclosure of ex gratia expenses

n/a

FRD 13

Disclosure of parliamentary appropriations

66–69

FRD 21C

Disclosures of responsible persons, executive officers and other personnel (contractors with significant management responsibilities) in the financial report

97–100

FRD 103H

Non-financial physical assets

86–87

FRD 110A

Cash flow statements

62

FRD 112D

Defined benefit superannuation obligations

71

FRD 114C

Financial instruments — general government entities and public non-financial corporations

88–90

Legislation

Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006

151

Building Act 1993

153

Carers Recognition Act 2012

153

Disability Act 2006

155

Financial Management Act 1994

107

Freedom of Information Act 1982

155

Gender Equality Act 2020

154

Local Jobs First Act 2003

156

Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012

157

Reviewed 29 October 2021

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